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Aug 29, 2019

Progress Report June, July and August

Children of Mah Dis
Children of Mah Dis

REPORT ON MAH DI’S ORPHANAGE AND FATHER’S HOUSE ORPHANAGE.

Pictures belong to Mah Di´s Orphanage.

Context: For three years now, there has been a shutdown on schools in the South-West and North-West Regions of Cameroon. However, some schools continue, and both orphanages are struggling to home-school their children in a safe environment. That is why you can read this is one of the main concerns in both homes.

1. Mah Di’s Orphanage

Mah Di’s Orphanage has been very effective and functional within the last months. In July, they spent averagely about 600,000frs (about 1,000 $) for food, medication, staff cost, bills etc. The children were able to eat at least three times a day. During this holiday period, the children have been attending workshops on trades such as tailoring, welding, hairdressing and cooking, especially the bigger children. This practice keeps them busy and prepares them to manage their households in the future. Two female children who succeeded the Advanced Level General Certificate Examination (GCE A/Level) wrote competitive entrance examinations to enable them enter the public service.

As far as this up coming school-year is concerned, the founder has already put in place certain measures to enable all the children go to school for free. An extension of class five has been added at the school in the orphanage to accommodate all age groups, and six teachers hired for ten months to teach Primary school. The founder was able to apply to the Ministry of Social Affairs to take care of the school fees of the children in secondary school. They now need more benches in the class room to accommodate the growing population.

The orphanage is clearly still under pressure these days. The building is tight and cannot accommodate all the children. This is partly because of the absorption of some displaced children as a result of the war. There is thus, a need for expansion. Due to this tight space the hygienic condition of the orphanage is deteriorating from its standards. The current toilet cannot accommodate the growing population. Also, the children don’t have the space they need to feel free around the house.

Fishery, piggery, poultry, farming and animal husbandry remain their main sources of income. Within the month of July and August, they had a profit of 250,000 FRS only from the poultry. That same period, 25 pigs and piglets died as a result of an epidemic bringing some loses to the orphanage, just ten pigs survived, which is more than usual for an outbreak of the African Schwine Flu, and shows good livestock management.

The children have also engaged themselves in farming of vegetables, corn and other food crops. They use proceeds from these farming activities for their up-keep and part for home consumption.

The orphanage has a high need for mosquito nets at the moment. They equally need bed sheets, assistance to extend the orphanage building and general assistance to pay workers and running costs. Most of the children in the orphanage need pullovers especially as it rains much and it´s chilly this season.

The founder of the orphanage thanks the partners immensely for their continuous support and assistance to the orphanage and she prays the almighty God continues to bless you.

2. Father’s House Orphanage

Thanks to your support, this orphanage has been very functional in the past months. The children are able to eat three times a day, unlike before when they couldn’t afford three square meals. The orphanage is now involved in selling fresh fish to make ends meet. They buy fish for 42,000frs and sell for 58,000frs within a period of two weeks. The palm farm project which used to be one of their main sources of income has been discontinued since the rents expired and it was not renewed. The ongoing conflict makes it dangerous to go to the farm and the prices have dropped too. They are now engaged in the rearing of pigs which is a lucrative business in that community. The founder is positive with this piggery business and she believes that in the nearest future it will generate much income for the orphanage.

During this holiday period, the children have been involved in workshops and other training classes to keep themselves busy and occupied. As far as this new academic year is concern, the founder is very worried concerning the fate of the children due to the Anglophone crisis. She is worried on how the children will cope with the current threats against school resumption. But despite this fear, she promised to hire teachers that can teach the children at the orphanage. For those in secondary education, she promised to send them to areas where schools are going on. As compared to the previous months, the orphanage living standard has really increased. The hygienic conditions have improved as they are now able to afford toilet tissues, pads and other basic necessities. “I am very happy and comfortable now as compared to the other months, we are able to eat three times and sometimes even four times. My major problem now is the fear of not going to school but in case there is no school at all, I intend to do business in order to better my future. Thanks to you the donors we have a future to look up to’’ said Zebulan, one of the children.

However, the orphanage still faces challenges of lack of matrasses and other basic household items, they are hoping that well-wishers and donors like you will continue to reach out to them. Mrs. Commy, the Founder of the Orphanage is thankful to God for keeping them alive and her gratitude equally goes to REO which remains the lone local partner of the Orphanage, and to you, the donors for not giving up on them as others have.

children in tailoring workshop
children in tailoring workshop
Children at Welding workshop
Children at Welding workshop
children at hairdressing saloon
children at hairdressing saloon
Jun 10, 2019

REPORT ON MAH DI'S AND FATHER'S HOUSE ORPHANAGE

Baby Abigail
Baby Abigail

1. Mah Di’s Orphanage The Mah Di’s Orphanage was very effective and functional in the month of May. Within this month, they spent averagely 500,000frs (about 1,000 $) for food, medication, staff cost, bills etc. The children were able to eat four times a day. The school section was also operational from class one to four with plans to extend the school to class five by the next academic year. The orphanage also hired five teachers. Thanks to this initiative, most of the children in the orphanage are schooling except those who are below one year. They therefore, need more benches in the class room to accommodate the growing population. It should be noted that school is not going on in most of the South-West and North-West Regions due to the ongoing civil war. The orphanage is clearly under pressure these days. The building is tight and cannot accommodate all the children. This is partly because of the absorption of some displaced children between three months and 23 years old as a result of the war. There is thus, a need for expansion. Fishery, piggery, poultry, farming and animal husbandry remain their main sources of income. Within the month of May, they had a profit of 100,000 only from the piggery. The children have also engaged themselves in farming of cassava, corn and other food crops. They use proceeds from these farming activities for their up-keep. The orphanage has a high need for mosquito nets at the moment. They equally need kitchen utensils like pots, plates etc. Most of the children in the orphanage need pullovers especially as it rains much this season. This holiday period, the children are learning cooking, especially the bigger children. This practice keeps them busy and prepares them to manage their households in the future.

2. Father’s House Orphanage This orphanage was more functional in the month of May than the previous months. The kids ate three times a day, though sometimes food was not enough and they ended up eating twice during such days. The orphanage is now involved in selling yogurt to make ends needs. They spend 5000frs to produce the yogurt, which they sell at 10,000 making a 100% profit on the initial capital. They equally sell fish and palm oil, which helps in sustaining them. Due to the Anglophone crisis, the palm oil business has not been as lucrative as before. Sometimes sales are very low but this has not stopped the founder from working. “This palm oil business which Reach Out got for us is one of our main sources of income. Thanks to these palm oil, we are able to have some money for our up keep,” the Founder of the Orphanage testified. Due to the Anglophone crisis, children of Father’s House Orphanage have not been going to school. The situation persisted and the founder had to look for three teachers to come teach them at the orphanage, but the house is not currently able to pay them consistently. “I use to pay the teachers 20,000frs every month but they have stopped because this month I am not able to pay them again”. There are also shortages of basic commodities. Reach Out will keep working with your valuable donations to improve the situation of the orphanage. Mrs. Commy, the Founder of the Orphanage is thankful to God for keeping them alive and her gratitude equally goes to REO which remains the lone partner of the Orphanage, and to the donors for not giving up on them as others have.

Children and staff of Father's House
Children and staff of Father's House
Founder Welcomes Newest and Youngest Orphan
Founder Welcomes Newest and Youngest Orphan
Children pose with Founder during an event
Children pose with Founder during an event
Moki Victor
Moki Victor
Jun 7, 2019

progress report (March-April 2019)

The keep a girl alive program so far in this past months has not been as effective as we would have liked, due to the on-going armed conflict. There were several curfew days issued by the Non-State Armed Groups, and there was constant confrontation between the two sides of the conflict in Tole, making the community very insecure..  We are still in touch with the program participants.  43% of girls are still in the area, and doing business. A small percentage are in the area, not doing business, and the majority have left and are doing business elsewhere. All participants are still doing bookkeeping.  Monthly profits dropped in March by about 33%, and are now beginning to improve. With an average working capitalof 28,517 FRS (roughly 50$), some of the businesses are barely surviving.They try to adapt to the current situation, as some of them change their line of businesses just to make sure they survive this period.  

For the past two months we have noticed an increase in the request for loans. These loans are use to boost their working capital.Also some of the girls return to the community with no capital and had to request for loans to start all over again.  Thanks to your donations, they have a support to rely on. As the environment getscalm by the day more girls keep coming back to the area. So far from the last follow up in the month of May it shows that a good number of them are back in the community but some are yet to start doing business again.

Despite the difficult times some of the girls still keep up to their commitments to saving. At least 35% of the girls save every month this shows that they are very much active even in the current situation. We look forward to having in the coming months an increase in the profit as well as their capital.

Comment from our volunteers.

Lewin: The frequent lock downs and attacks from the non state armed groups, have left the community in a state of fear, putting activities and business on a standstill. Also some of the girls have been disturbed with some medical issues such as children being hospitalized, and there are others who have been sick for quite a while now and had to move to other areas in search for medical help. Many other girls have been showing interest in the program by trying to register.

Adeline: The poor network has weakened the follow up system as it was always difficult to reach the beneficiaries and on time, the Insecurity also contributes, as there were lockdowns and sometimes signals that violence might erupt. All these had a direct effect on the turnout of beneficiaries during follow up (May).

 
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