Avian Rehabilitation

by Jivdaya Charitable Trust
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
AVIAN EXPERT DR SHASHI TREAT ROSY PELICAN
AVIAN EXPERT DR SHASHI TREAT ROSY PELICAN

Uttarayan-Kite flying Festival is celebrated on the 14th and 15t of January every year in India. Every year during Uttarayan (kite flying festival) Jivdaya Charitable Trust’ organizes a huge camp for saving the birds called ‘USBC (Uttarayan Save The Birds Campaign) where thousands of birds come from all over the city Ahmedabad and its 100 km radius, (migrated and local both) severely injured with the glass coated threads (manja), as an effort to save the injured birds from certain death and giving them a survival chance. Even though our official USBC 2020 campaign date was 13th to 16th January 2020, we started receiving birds injured by manja used in kite fighting (Uttarayan) from mid-December.


Received 1397 birds during the campaign;
Birds on 13th Jan20:
136
Birds on 14th Jan20:
379
Birds on 15th Jan20:
571
Birds on 16th Jan20:
311

Total number of injured birds received from 1st Jan 2020 to 20th Jan 2020 is 2847 Birds of 39 species. Sadly, this will continue to go on until end of the month of February.  

Thank you for your support and trust!

COMPLEX SURGERY TO FIX THE WOUND
COMPLEX SURGERY TO FIX THE WOUND
ON GOING SURGERIES
ON GOING SURGERIES
PIGEON OT
PIGEON OT
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Recovery from anesthesia
Recovery from anesthesia

Sarus Crane is the tallest flying bird of the world. It is also the only resident crane of India. Sarus cranes are large, elegant cranes at 152-156 cms. They are listed as vulnerable as per IUCN red list, with decreasing population trend. The main threat to Sarus crane in India is the habitat loss and degradation of wetlands and conservation for agriculture, changing due to construction of highways, housing colonies, electrocution, and ingestion of pesticides.

This adult sarus crane was rescued from a field where it was found grounded, unable to fly. After initial investigation our vets found it was exhibiting symptoms of secondary poisoning due to pesticides in the farms. It was severely dehydrated when it came to us. It was treated for poisoning along with some supportive care and fluid therapy almost for a month. Now the bird is in our aviary where it will gain the stamina to take proper flight and will be releases to its natural habitat after recovery.

 

Thank you for joining us in this challenging response. We couldn’t have done this without the support and generosity of our donors. Hoping for such great deed in the future too, which would enable our organization to take care of these speechless animals and release them back to their home.

Physiotherapy given to birds
Physiotherapy given to birds
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Birds treated in our facility
Birds treated in our facility

Respected Donors!

Jivdaya Charitable Trust wishes you a very happy and prosperous new year 2020!

Last month we have received a total of 639 birds of 31 species, majority of cases are suffering from head injury, Dehydration, trauma and Kite string injury. A majority of these are rock pigeon and black kites as they are most abundant in the urban environment, but we also get rare endangered and migrated species like- Greylag Goose,

Swift, Godwitt Duck, Thicknee, Kingfisher, sarus crane for treatment and rehabilitation.

 

Below is the summary of birds treated in our hospital (December 2019):

 


Birds’ inward
Rock pigeon: 439

 

 

Black Indian kite: 75
Crow: 22

Dove: 16

Common Myna: 08
Rose ringed parakeets: 13

Alexandrian parakeets: 01
Black ibis: 03

Barn owl: 04

Peafowl: 05

Asian koel: 14

White ibis: 01

Vultures: 01

Quail: 03

Rosy starling: 02

Budgerigar: 11

Green pigeon: 05

Shikra: 01

Babbler: 01

Red Wattled Lapwing: 01

Water hen: 01

Other birds inward

Greylag Goose: 01

Scops Owl: 01

Indian treepie: 01

Bulbul: 02

Sun bird: 01

Swift: 01

Sarus crane: 02

Godwitt Duck: 01

Thicknee: 01

Kingfisher: 01

 

We are very thankful for your generous contribution till date.

Hoping for such great deed in the future too which would enable our organization to take care of these speechless birds and release them back to their home.

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After recovery
After recovery

The Kite is a medium-sized raptor (bird of prey). This adult kite was met with an accident and got damaged its leg and wing, some local people rescued the bird with a critical situation and brought to our facility on 7th Nov19. After examination and X-ray vets found out the birds had a severe fracture in the leg and found a wound in the left wing, our vets have done pinning surgery to fix the problem.

After the successful surgery the bird is rapidly recovering under the supervision of our avian experts, who are constantly following up with its regular medication, nutrition and bandaging. The bird will be released to its natural habitat once completely recovered.

 

Thank you for your support and trust!
We request your strong association with our projects to continue the work of saving speechless and helpless animals!

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Birds in our facility
Birds in our facility

We have receive 575 birds and 241 infants (Mostly orphan) in the month of November, suffering from head injury, Dehydration, Kite string injury, trauma and illness. A majority of these are rock pigeon and black kites as they are most abundant in the urban environment, but we also get rare endangered and sometimes critically endangered species for treatment and rehabilitation. Saving every individual bird is important for conservation of species and we have successfully treated and released above 70% of the received birds.

Below is the summary of birds treated in our hospital (Nov19):


Rock pigeon: 403

Black Indian kite: 30
Crow: 20

Dove: 17

Common Myna: 08
Rose ringed parakeets: 22

Alexandrian parakeets: 02
Black ibis: 03

Barn owl: 04

Peafowl: 05

Asian koel: 25

Quail: 03

Rosy starling: 05

Budgerigar: 10

Green pigeon: 14

Shikra: 01

Babbler: 01

Red Wattled Lapwing: 02

Southern coucal: 01

Water hen: 01



  Thank you very much for always helping us by donating generously to carry on with our work and saving distressed innocent lives.

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Organization Information

Jivdaya Charitable Trust

Location: Ahmedabad, Gujarat - India
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Project Leader:
Jivdaya Charitable Trust JCT
Ahmedabad, gujarat India

Funded Project!

Combined with other sources of funding, this project raised enough money to fund the outlined activities and is no longer accepting donations.
   

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