Avian Rehabilitation

by Jivdaya Charitable Trust
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
RESCUED BABY IBIS AND EGRET
RESCUED BABY IBIS AND EGRET

Rescuing and Releasing Baby black Ibis and Egret:

These two little ones were brought in after the tree on which the parents were nesting was cut down.

No other babies could be  rescued except for these two.

They were raised right here at our centre and then released into the aviary once they were old enough to feed on their own.

We had to show them to learn to fly and forage for food.

For proper training, we got them settled with the older egrets and ibis that we had.

Once incorporated into the mini flock with the other water birds, we released them all together at a local wetland.

It is always best to raise these kind of youngsters together rather than alone, so that they get less imprinted on their human caretakers.

Its easy to release them properly and faster for them to get in touch with their natural instincts.

We under our Awareness program spread this message to the local community that please do not cut trees as they are the habitat of thousands of species, especially the winged ones.

Besides rescuing, treating, follow up and release of animals and birds, we  are also engaged in community compassionate programs to save our environment and other species around us by developing sensitvity and affection among population for other animals and birds.

Keep your helping hand on us to fulfill our mission of saving innocent lives by donating generously.

OUR AVIARY POND WHERE GROWN UP BABIES ARE KEPT
OUR AVIARY POND WHERE GROWN UP BABIES ARE KEPT
GROWN UP BIRD TO BE RELEASED IN WETLAND
GROWN UP BIRD TO BE RELEASED IN WETLAND
GROWN UP BABY ENJOYING IN AVIARY SECTION
GROWN UP BABY ENJOYING IN AVIARY SECTION
BIRD NOW READY TO BE RELEASED
BIRD NOW READY TO BE RELEASED
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ALEXANDRINE PARAKEET UNDER MONITORING IN OPEN AREA
ALEXANDRINE PARAKEET UNDER MONITORING IN OPEN AREA

ALEXANDRINE PARAKEET

Illegal wildlife trade is widespread globally, and is possibly third in value behind the illegal narcotics and arms trades.

For centuries, parrots have been kept as pets mainly because they are straightforward to keep and easy to replace because of the large numbers in trade. This has in turn created demand that has led to an organized illegal trade in parrots and parakeets.

Alexandrine Parakeet is Loyal, playful and talkative which can also learn tricks and is inclined to show off its acrobat skills.

Because of this nature and personality, “The Alexandrine Parakeet is one of the most sought after species in the Indian live bird trade and is traded in large volumes throughout the year".

Unfortunately one such lovely and active Alexandrine parakeet got caught up in a cage by an illegal trader and was kept in captivity for few weeks.

Fortunately one of our Rescuer got the information and rescued the parakeet.

It was brought to our hospital in a bad shape as it had injuries in its wings due to its stay in the cage illegally for weeks.

Our Aviary experts immediately shifted it to the Aviary section and without much delay started with its treatment.

Balanced nutrition consisting of fresh vegetables, leafy greens, grains, some healthy seed, tree nuts and a high quality commercially made formulated pelleted diet was given to it.

Alexandrine Parakeets are very active birds, and so they need plenty of exercise to maintain their physical and emotional health.

A large flight cage was prepared for it with plenty of space to be able to move around without damaging their long, beautiful tail feathers.

 A minimum of 3 to 4 hours a day to stretch, play and exercise outside of its cage was monitored by our Aviary team to strengthen its flight muscles.

Now almost it has grown strong, intelligent, more playful and active and welcomes everyone by its powerful vocal sound.

We are now in the process of contacting forest officials for its safe release and rehabilitation in its natural habitat.

Dear Donors!  Kindly continue supporting  us and cooperate  with us  in our mission of rehabilitation of wildlife in distress in its natural home.

Donate generously to keep our noble cause running smoothly for the benefit of Wildlife.

ALEXANDRINE PARAKEET DISPLAYING STRONG FLIGHT WING
ALEXANDRINE PARAKEET DISPLAYING STRONG FLIGHT WING
ALEXANDRINE READY FOR REHABILITATION IN WILD
ALEXANDRINE READY FOR REHABILITATION IN WILD
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Recovered-glue-trap-free black kite
Recovered-glue-trap-free black kite

SAVING BLACK KITE FROM GLUE TRAP AND ITS REHABILITATION:

BLACK KITE:

The Black Kite is a medium-sized raptor (bird of prey).

The Black Kite's range covers the majority of the Australian mainland, as well as Africa, Asia and Europe.

The Black Kite is arguably the most numerous species of raptor in the world.

Habitat:  The Black Kite is found in a variety of habitats, from timbered watercourses to open plains, and is often observed in and around outback towns. 
Feeding: The Black Kite preys on lizards, small mammals and insects, especially grasshoppers.
It also is a scavenger, and frequents tips in outback towns. 
Its this habit of feeding leads it to cover a wider area and get caught in killing traps, one of which is the dangerous Glue-trap.
GLUE TRAPS- THE TRAPS OF PAIN- AND DANGER TO THE  WILDLIFE :
Glue traps are one of the most cruellest form of killing or trapping animals and birds, both small and large-sized.
 Once trapped the animals try their best to escape from it, but during this struggle , the glue rips off their delicate skin, furs and feathers.
One such case of Glue-Trapped  Black kite was brought into our hospital that was badly caught in it, with most of the feathers stuck together.
The bird couldn't even open its wings properly let alone fly off the trap.
There were even  remnants of a dead rat on the trap, which obviously was the reason for a scavenger like the Kite to end up in a glue trap. 

The bird was badly stressed out and pretty dehydrated as well.

Our team of experts quickly set into getting as much glue off as they could and then re-hydrating the bird was the next step. 
We used baby oil to remove most of the glue off the body  that helped the feathers from sticking further to the body or to anything else that it touched.

After a few days of oil washes and dish washing liquid baths, the bird's feathers were able to come back to normal.

Baby oil was put all over the sticky areas, then using clean dry cloth excess glue was taken off the body.

After that the oil was massaged into the feathers to loosen the glue.

 
Last step before putting it back to the cage was giving it a bath with liquid soap to get the excess oil, glue and dirt off the Kite.
 

This Kite was lucky as  we managed to get it off the glue trap and back on its feet, but others aren't so lucky.

There are numerous predators and scavengers that get attracted to the insects and pests that are caught on these glue trap.

They normally end up dying right there at the spot on those old discarded traps.

Now our Black kite is recovered to be released back into the wild in its natural habitat!

Hats off to our team of doctors and experts that we were able to rescue the bird from a fatal injury!!

We already are in the process of creating awareness through face-to-face interaction with rescuers, animal-lovers, local community , through social media and other programs.

We kindly request people and want to convey this message that :- 

" Glue traps are the worst kind of pest control, please DO NOT use them. Use more humane rat traps to catch and release the pests."

We once again put out our heart and souls for compassionate people all over the world, our donors, supporters and well-wishers of our work and wildlife conservation, to remain as supportive you are and donate for a cause to protect innocent lives around us.

Our Aviary expert handling glued kite
Our Aviary expert handling glued kite
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Indian thick knee (Burhinus indicus) under care
Indian thick knee (Burhinus indicus) under care

INDIAN THICK KNEE( BURHINUS INDICUS) :

The Indian stone-curlew or Indian thick-knee (Burhinus indicus) is a species of bird in the family Burhinidae.

This species is found in the plains of India, Pakistan, Nepal and Sri Lanka.

They have large eyes and are brown with streaks and pale marks making it hard to spot against the background of soils and rocks.

Mostly active in the dark, they produce calls similar to the true curlews, giving them their names.

Their diet mainly consists of insects, worms and small reptiles and occasionally some seeds.

Our organisation received such a rare bird in bad condition that was brought to us by a family who had protected it from a deserted area  where it was lost and was trying hard to get  back to its habitat.

After taking it home, they found the bird  in pain. Out of compassion they tried some home-remedies, unknowingly and un-intentionally that the bird they were handling was a rare wild bird almost in endangered list.

This poor bird was then brought in with a wing injury in the right wing to our hospital.

Yet sadly there was  not much we could  do for its right wing to be normal as It was brought in very late after being kept at home for 2 weeks.

This time lapse  gave the injury time to heal wrongly and allowed the wing to nearly fuse.

We  still tried with physiotherapy to exercise the wing and loosen the muscle.

Luckily with the hardwork of our Vets and other Aviary staff  the thick-knee is now roaming free in our  Aviary section recovering body and wing strength. 

We kindly requested the public and also have started creating awareness through interactions, emails, talks ,  to please hand over such birds on time and allow us a chance to heal them properly.

Once the thick-knee recovers completely it would be  released back to the wild with help of Forest officials.

Our awareness programs and posts on social media have helped us to  make people understand the significance of this species and also conveyed local community to not  try self medicating and feeding wild birds at home.

It will only end up being disastrous for these injured rare wild birds.

And fortunately people seem to have understood the consequences of treating or keeping such birds at home and not bringing them to our hospital.

We are grateful to all our supporters, well-wishers, donors, patrons and local public to help us in our mission of wildlife conservation and saving the habitats by rehabilitating their natural inhabitants.

We kindly request you to keep up with your extraordinary deed through generous donations to our organisation so that we can carry on with our mission of saving and relocating wildlife.

The healed right wing after physio exercises
The healed right wing after physio exercises
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RESCUED COPPERSMITH BARBET BABY UNDER  CARE
RESCUED COPPERSMITH BARBET BABY UNDER CARE

Numerous baby birds or sometimes an entire nest with freshly-laid eggs too!! are brought in our campus by our dedicated rescuers and volunteers. 

Birds gather twigs, twine and anything they can get their beaks on to create a cozy home for their families this time of year. With an increasing loss of natural habitat, cases related to falling of infant birds or nests with eggs have increased.

These Baby birds are endearing, but just as every new parent learns their baby isn't at all like an adult, baby birds differ significantly from adult birds as well.

Hence its a very big responsibity on the part of our Aviary experts and Birders who understand those differences  better  and help baby birds to grow in our Aviary section with utmost care, love and affection.

Initially we retrieve the baby bird into the makeshift nest gently or if its natural nest is found somewhere around it can be used  to keep it comfortable.

Baby birds of similar species are kept together so that there is less stress on a single individual. Also species like crows and koels which end up sharing a nest are also hand-raised together till they have learned to fly, after which the koels are kept with other older koels to learn the tricks of the trade. 


All of our baby birds are hand-raised till they learn to eat on their own, they are taught from an early age to pick up food so that they can become self reliant soon. After a few weeks they are shifted to a larger outdoor cage with a few older birds of the same species from whom they can learn, before they are released back to the wild.

We receive hundreds of cases of baby birds being brought to our hospital, where, they have fallen from their nests due to weakness, or may be attacked by predators or being abandoned by their mothers.

In case of eggs or neonatal, we have special Aviary Intensive Care unit and brooding units for them, where they are taken care by our Vets and para-vets and other staff round- the -clock to raise them to grow healthy and stronger.

Once we received a case of an infant of Coppersmith Barbet species brought to our hospital by a rescuer group.

The little birdie fell from its nest due to weakness and thankfully didn’t suffer any major injury.

However, the birdie was unable to open its right eye.

For treatment, it was kept on fluid therapy, hand feeding and given certain medicines. After the treatment, it was kept in a handmade nest where it rested properly.

We are indeed thankful to this rescuer group for bringing in the barbet on time and save its life.

We generally through our Awareness programs, like, "Save the Bird Campaign", " Back to the Wild", Bird Release Program", generally give message to the local community , that-  - IF YOU FIND A BIRD FALLEN ON THE GROUND, FIRST OF ALL LOOK AROUND FOR THE BIRD’S NEST. USE CLEAN OR GLOVED HANDS TO PLACE THE BIRD BACK TO THE NEST QUICKLY. IF YOU FIND IT INJURED OR VERY WEAK, KINDLY BRING IT TO OUR CLINIC AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.

These programs have helped hundreds of neo-natal from getting perished due to timely action taken by community as well as our team of doctors and other staff.

We are very thankful for your generous contribution till date.

Hoping for such great deed in the future too which would enable our organization to take care of these neonatal birdies and release them back to their home to their families.

RED VENT BULBUL BABY UNDER CARE OF VETS
RED VENT BULBUL BABY UNDER CARE OF VETS
kOEL AND CROW BABIES  NURTURED IN A CAGE
kOEL AND CROW BABIES NURTURED IN A CAGE
HAND-FEEDING AND CARE GIVEN TO NEO-NATALS
HAND-FEEDING AND CARE GIVEN TO NEO-NATALS
RESCUED BABIES NURTURED AND TAKEN CARE
RESCUED BABIES NURTURED AND TAKEN CARE
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Organization Information

Jivdaya Charitable Trust

Location: Ahmedabad, Gujarat - India
Website:
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Project Leader:
Jivdaya Charitable Trust JCT
Ahmedabad, gujarat India

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