Avian Rehabilitation

by Jivdaya Charitable Trust
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Greater Flamingo
Greater Flamingo

Birds tell us a lot about changes to the environment, they are easy to see, and by protecting them we are looking after the environment as a whole.

But they themselves are readily affected by physical and chemical impacts on their ecosystems, whether these are caused by natural or man-made influences.

Our organization receives almost over 50 to 60 cases per day of birds (adults and babies both) on an average, that are sick, injured, abandoned,captive and neglected.

Varied treatments are undertaken based on their ailments and suffering.Different cases are treated as per their age, size ,weight and symptoms.

Once the process of recovery starts, which too differs as per their age and symptoms and many other factors, they are being kept in different sections , depending on the time taken for their recovery.

Once they are in their final phase of recovery, they are conditioned to adjust into their natural environment , whereby the smaller birds, like sparrow , sunbirds , or mynah need to be raised among adults to give them a feeling of their parents from whom they got separated.

Whereas the bigger birds are raised in the environment that facilitates their rehabilitation in a new location or may be the same location (peacocks, kites, shikra, ibis, etc.)

Finally the fully recovered and nicely raised birds are released, relocated and rehabilitated in their natural environment by us.

Our organization definitely needs funding for such a large number of bird cases that it receives for the noble cause of “saving environment by saving the birds”.

Kindly help us to achieve our work of balancing the ecosystem by saving these beautiful and splendid species through generous donations by you so that we continue to hear these species singing and see them living in happiness and safety in their habitat.

Greylag goose
Greylag goose
Indian Ring-necked parakeet release
Indian Ring-necked parakeet release
Release of aquatic birds
Release of aquatic birds
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A chick nestling which was hatched at JCT
A chick nestling which was hatched at JCT

Baby birds are so beautiful and listening to their sweet chirping is even more tranquil. This is the season for infant birds from hatchlings to nestlings to fledglings. At Jivdaya Charitable Trust we receive a huge number of infant birds this season. The infants are of common myna, red-vented bulbul, house crows, house sparrows, etc.

The infants are taught by their parents to fly and survive. They mostly are taught on the ground to hide and survive from predators. People confuse them of being lost or injured and bring them to our center in terms of saving them. But in reality they are being parted away from their parents. This is the nesting season for many birds. Crows are one of them. We, at Jivdaya Charitable Trust are receiving a lot of cases of injured, dehydrated crows or a normal crow who has fallen from its nest. Particularly, we are receiving more jungle crows than house crows. Also in that, we are receiving more infant crows than adults. When an infant crow learns to fly, it often falls on the ground and then, is not able to get up. People then think that the bird is injured or lost. So in order to earn good deed, they bring the infant crow here for treatment but actually they are doing a bad deed by separating the bird from its parents. A very important message to all people is, if you find an infant bird somewhere on the road, search for its nest nearby immediately. If the nest is not there, try to build a nest at a height where the dogs and cats cannot reach. If it is injured badly, then please take it to a nearby hospital or bring it to Jivdaya Charitable Trust. But if you find it just fallen on the road, please put it safely in a nearby nest or just wait for its parents to be back.

We request people to fund us so that we can provide these tiny beautiful infants a healthy life. If found on road please put it back in the direction it was going if not injured. In case of injury take it to a nearby animal hospital.

House Crow infants
House Crow infants
Red Vented Bulbul infant
Red Vented Bulbul infant
Feeding time for little sparrow
Feeding time for little sparrow
Special attention and feeding by our staff
Special attention and feeding by our staff
Baby birds need a lot of care
Baby birds need a lot of care

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Vulture after being treated for dehydration
Vulture after being treated for dehydration

In the month of May the ngo witnessed a lot of birds. The major cause of illness or injury was dehydration. Due to dehydration the birds become unconscious and fall on the ground leading to an injury. They also get stuck on a place due to lack of water availability and are to be rescued. The summers are creating a huge trouble for the birds. Urbanization is snatching away their original habitats and they feel lost in the cities.

The birds rescued and treated during the month of May included the birds like Rock pigeon, Black Indian Kite, Crow, Dove, Common Myna, Rose ringed parakteet, Plum headed parakeet, Alexandrian parakeet, House sparrow, Black ibis, Barn owl, Hen, Peafowl, Asian Koel, Vulture, Fruit bat, Short nose bat, Green pigeon, Shikra, Wood pecker, Babler, Flamingo, Bulbul, Grey leg goose, Indian Pitta, etc. The bird with the highest number of entry in the ngo was Rock pigeon; approximately 420 were treated and released in their habitat after recovery.

Especially for the birds, an ORS camp is conducted on weekend at different locations of the city. Hundreds of public interactions are done regarding do’s and don’ts concerning birds for the summers. Water pots are distributed free of cost to people so that they can put them outside their house and make water accessible to the birds. The staff and volunteers of Jivdaya Charitable Trust also teach people to make ORS at home and put it in water that can help birds escape dehydration.

WE REQUEST PEOPLE TO PUT WATER POTS WITH ORS OUTSIDE THEIR HOUSE TO HELP BIRDS QUENCH THEIR THIRST. PLEASE DONATE AND HELP US GIVE A BETTER AND HEALTHY LIFE TO THE BIRDS.

Peahen resting in an aviary
Peahen resting in an aviary
Barn owl recovering after a fracture surgery
Barn owl recovering after a fracture surgery
Indian Pitta rescued and treated at JCT
Indian Pitta rescued and treated at JCT
Black ibis recovering in the aviary
Black ibis recovering in the aviary
Laser Flamingo
Laser Flamingo

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Black kite baby
Black kite baby

With the spring coming in hurriedly, we are getting many baby birds that are coming in as orphans. 

The black-rumped flameback woodpecker came to us as a rescued fledgeling. It was found grounded, unable to fly. It was found to be dehydrated and light weight suggesting starvation. With proper treatment and nutrition, and ample flight practice, the bird is getting better and soon will be released back in nature.

We also received a black kite baby that fell from its nest as the parents never returned. It was hungry and dehydrated. It is under our constant care now.

We have also received a few hatchling rose-ringed parakeets that were rescued from the city. A hollow branch of a tree fell down where the nest was located. The babies are now being raised at our centre, in specialized brooders. They will receive special formula food for optimum growth. We are appealing the public to be careful with trimming and cutting trees, many birds breed during this time of the year.

Thank you donors for supporting our work!

Black-rumped flameback woodpecker baby
Black-rumped flameback woodpecker baby
Rose-ringed parakeet babies
Rose-ringed parakeet babies

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Release of Egyptian vulture
Release of Egyptian vulture

Among other birds we keep receiving for rehabilitation, one Himalayan griffon vulture (Gyps himalayensis) and an Egyptian vulture (Neophron percnopterus) were brought in with different histories.

Both vultures made full recovery and were released back in nature!

The Egyptian vulture was rescued from Ahmedabad and was brought in to our centre for emergency treatment. It has suffered  left wing patagial laceration due to manja (glass-powder coated sharp thread used to fly kites in India) and was bleeding profusely. The bird was operated under isoflurane general aenesthesia for suturing of left wing patagial laceration. Fluid therapy was administered for the first two days and then regular antibiotics and pain management for five days along with alternate day dressing, physiotherapy and figure of  eight bandaging. Bandage was removed after 15 days.The wound was recovering well so laterit was shifted in aviary for flying practice 20 days after the surgery.  This bird also flew beautifully back in nature. The bird has a leg band for post release monitoring.

 

The Himalayan griffon vulture juveline was found grounded in Jamnagar near a wind mill and was assumed to have collided with the wind mill. It was first sent to St. Peter Scott bird hospital in Jamnagar but the bird never flew. It was then shifted to our centre where we took a radio graph to ensure there are no broken bones. We found a dislocation of a wing and the bird was treated accordingly. It was then given ample physiotherapy and flight practise so it could gain the needed confidence and stamina. It stayed with us for almost 2 months and gained a couple of kilograms in weight. At time of release it was 9.6 kg. We put a leg band before releasing for post release monitoring. The bird flew away beautifully and is been reported from the field! 

Thank you donors for your support!

Egyptian vulture with a figure of eight bandage
Egyptian vulture with a figure of eight bandage
Himalayan griffon vulture in its enclosure
Himalayan griffon vulture in its enclosure
Himalayan griffon vulture with leg band
Himalayan griffon vulture with leg band
Himalayan griffon vulture being released
Himalayan griffon vulture being released
Himalayan griffon vulture in flight after release
Himalayan griffon vulture in flight after release

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Organization Information

Jivdaya Charitable Trust

Location: Ahmedabad, Gujarat - India
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Project Leader:
Jivdaya Charitable Trust JCT
Ahmedabad, gujarat India

Funded Project!

Combined with other sources of funding, this project raised enough money to fund the outlined activities and is no longer accepting donations.
   

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