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Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected

by Japan Emergency NGO (JEN)
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected
Relief Assistance for Tohoku Earthquake Affected

JEN is working with partner organizations in Iwaki City for valunerable people, including children and disabled, "disaster prevention that no one can leave."

 

In the Great East Japan Earthquake, the death rate of elderly people over 60 years old and those with disabilities more than 60% of those who died due to the earthquake was twice that of the entire inhabitants.

In the Kumamoto earthquake, more than 200 people died due to "disaster-related death" such as the harsh evacuation life after the disaster, many of them were elderly people with an existing disease.

 

On the other hand, there are areas where people with disabilities in the disaster area, those with experience in care for women and the elderly, have been active as leaders with people responsible for regional disaster prevention. In such areas, skill of residents are fully utilized, and evacuation guidance is well organized, too. There are many cases reported that the information and emergency supports are provided smoothly to those who evacuate at home. Close communication from the daily life are indispensable.

 

In the international conference etc., the word "inclusive disaster prevention" has spread considerably over the last few years due to the encouragement of the disabled people that lead to disaster prevention. The following four elements of “Inclusiveness” are important.

 

1. Diversity is recognized: The impact of disasters varies depending on each individual's disability, gender, age, etc. This means that diversity is recognized by those around us.

 

2. Safety: It is based on recognition of diversity that disaster and subsequent safety are secured. For example, whether the wheelchair or the invisible one is devised so that a safe evacuation action can be taken.

 

3 Part of the decision making process: It is the people who knows the most about diversity. It is important that the disabled people is making decisions.

 

4. Barrier-free environment: Participation in decision-making is impossible unless obstacles are removed in decision-making process. For example, there are sign language interpreters for hearing impaired people, whether they are meeting rooms that even wheelchair users can enter.

 

 

Links:

JEN has been providing support in “Raising the Next Generation Project” from the planning phase. The project aims that young people in their teens to 30s become attracted to the idea of participating in regional development, making the region where young generation want to work and live in future.


The project implement body is a group that supports raising the next generations, which is composed of SAVE TAKATA and Rikuzentakata citizen. Adults support junior high students in the project. ”EXCITE TAKATA”, a two-hour presentation by 2nd year junior high students in Rikuzentakata, was held on Jan 14 2018. The venue was the Abasse Takata, a shopping mall in Rikuzentakata. 50 members of Rikuzentakata-citizen and 20 junior-high students attended the event.

Some attendees said “Kids are trying their best, so we have to do our best, too.”, “I support the students’ efforts.” From these comments, we realize the project has been supporting not only children but also the region.

This is a presentation by the students who had tried workplace experience.

They made a presentation on what they had learned from meeting people who engage in the activity to rebuild Rikuzentakata, expressing they realized each person is building Rikuzentakata. They prepared the presentation material by themselves.

The title of this presentation is “Nobody calls Rikuzentakata the ordinery rural area”. Students voiced their opinions that Rikuzentakata may be the hope among other disaster areas if it would achieve  the revitalization to becomean extraordinary city in 10-20 years.

Photo

There was an opinion among junior high students “Is there anything we can do more in Rikuzentakata?”, and 18 student volunteers started “FACE(Future, Action, Connect, Evolution)”. The team is carrying out activities of region development with the help of the support group.

Photo

Rikuzentakata, rebuilding.

Links:

JEN organized a Tohoku Partners Meeting in October. This meeting is held once a year to gather all the 7 partner NPOs to review then activities they implemented over the year together with JEN.

Our partners are all based in local area of 3 Tsunami affected prefectures; Iwate, Miyagi and Fukushima. Their support projects are related to each area's social issues and its beneficiaries are male caretakers, Childrens Cafeteria, Income generation for young generation etc.

Even though they are tackling different social issues, the goal is the same, "Leave no one behind".

Day1; 7 NPOs presented their achievement and discussed each other for the betterment.

DAY 2; JEN invited a consultant whose speciality is to support Not for profit organizations whose work is to make social change.

Now on its 6 years after the disaster, and the social activities are coming to the phase whether conclude or pursue, due to the lack of resources, lack of marketing skill and above all lack of organizational skill by evaluating the needs on the ground again and again. JEN is happy to support NPOs who run good practices within their community. In year 2018, it will be another challenging year on the above reasons. However, JEN works together with them and through them, wishing to contribute the better recovery from the disaster and moreover realize the fundamental social issues and make change in our society.

Links:

Children prepared fireworks
Children prepared fireworks

JEN continues to support “SHIOKAZE KITCHEN”, run by Miyako Council of Social Welfare in Iwate prefecture.

One of seven children is now in the poor in Japan. The poverty rate of a single mother family is especially over 50%.

“SHIOKAZE KITCHEN” is now an capacious community place to prevent children from giving up their dream and also to prevent parent from holding their problems by themselves.

Every month, a single parent and the children, volunteering and staff from Miyako Council of Social Welfare get together, prepare meals, eat and enjoy the time together. Also, they sometimes listen to their problems.

This kitchen is monthly held in the community place, using a kitchen and a Japanese style room.

In August, we had an outdoor BBQ party as special event during summer holiday, as requested by children.

It was unfortunately heavy rainy day, however, everyone had great time all together with never ending laughter!.

Preparing rice balls for BBQ
Preparing rice balls for BBQ
BBQ started!
BBQ started!
After the BBQ, we also enjoyed fireworks
After the BBQ, we also enjoyed fireworks
Workshop on dysphagia
Workshop on dysphagia

What kind of people do you associate with the word “caregivers”?

In Japan, the most common caregivers is spouses who are living together account for the largest percentage of 26.2%. This is followed by adult children living together at 21.8%. In fact, one in three caregivers is male.

In Ishinomaki City, an area that suffered severe damage due to the Great East Japan Earthquake in March 2011, the percentage of people identified as needing long-term care has increased from 16.1% in February 2011 to 19.0% three years later, which is a 1.3-fold rise.

JEN has partnered with a voluntary organization called the “Caregiving Class for Men” composed of medical and nursing care specialists in order to support male caregivers. The “Caregiving Class for Men” was launched after the earthquake to hold nursing care study classes for male caregivers who have limited experience in housework and tended to be isolated.

The “classes,” which are held once a month, are a great success with about 30 participants every time. The nursing care managers have tenaciously requested male caregivers to participate in the classes and have been providing programs to meet the needs of them. In the classes, they can not only acquire the basic knowledge and skills of nursing care, but also enjoy an environment in which they can talk about their daily problems with each other and engage in networking with specialists and medical staff.

The main programs so far are as follows, below bullets.
This coming September, a symposium will be held on the coastal area in Miyagi to share the experiences and lessons learned from the “Caregiving Class for Men” of Ishinomaki City with nursing care and medical specialists in Tohoku region.
Details will be announced once decided.

- How to cook nursing meals
- Easy cooking recipes (packed and ready eat meals, etc.)
- Workshop on dysphagia
- Workshop on oral care
- Workshop on heat stroke and its countermeasures
- Workshop on the prevention of influenza and gastroenteritis
- Workshop on dementia care
- Workshop on bedsore prevention
- Emergency life-saving training
- Workshop on nursing skills (diaper changing, feeding, and transfer assistance, etc.)
- Health care for caregivers
- Pottery classes to ease caregiver stress
- Group meetings to exchange opinions and promote good fellowship among the participants

Making rice balls
Making rice balls
 

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Organization Information

Japan Emergency NGO (JEN)

Location: Tokyo, n/a - Japan
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @NGO_JEN
Project Leader:
Asuka Kuroki
Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo Japan
$67,327 raised of $100,000 goal
 
278 donations
$32,673 to go
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