Avian Rehabilitation

by Jivdaya Charitable Trust
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Avian Rehabilitation
Oriental honey buzzard was suffering dehydration
Oriental honey buzzard was suffering dehydration

We received many birds in the month of October suffering from trauma and illness due to the heavy monsoons. We received a total of 331 orphan birds, most of which had to be handraised. They were provided with special care in the brooders and were given formula food until being weaned on natural diet. 

Other birds that came in were suffering from injuries, both soft tissue injuries and bone fractures. They require long term care and a lot of physiotherapy before they are fit for release. Other birds totalled 945 and around 80% were successfully saved. 

A lot of birds came to us in emaciated condition, malnourished and dehydrated. This suggests that the rapid urbanization is taking a toll on these birds and perhaps on other urban wildlife. Sometimes, supportive care for a few days help them fully recover and they are released back in nature. 

Thank you for your support! 

Black ibis on a sling for physiotherapy
Black ibis on a sling for physiotherapy
Orphan common myna hatchling
Orphan common myna hatchling
Indian peafowl hatchling hatched in our incubator
Indian peafowl hatchling hatched in our incubator
Indian peafowl hatched from egg
Indian peafowl hatched from egg
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Comb duck babies inside intensive care brooder
Comb duck babies inside intensive care brooder

These past few weeks have truly been a 'baby bird season'. We received a total of 267 baby (mostly orphan) birds of 31 species that we spent most of time handraising, and then rehabilitating back. It is very important to provide the right nutrition for the species we work with, else birds suffer from various conditions due to improper nutrition. We also make sure to provide a well designed pre-release conditioning environment wherein the babies learn and exhibit natural behaviors and are often kept with adult conspecifics. 

Other birds that came in for vairous injuries and illnesses were 971. A large majority of these are rock pigeons that are very common in our city but we also get rare, endangered, and sometimes critically endangered species for rehabilitation.

Our ultimate goal remains to rehabilitate as many as we can back in nature. Thank you for your support!

Yellow-legged green pigeons
Yellow-legged green pigeons
Beak fracture repair of a black ibis
Beak fracture repair of a black ibis
Lesser whistling duck babies
Lesser whistling duck babies
Baya weaver bird chicks
Baya weaver bird chicks
Shikra released post surgi-repair of wing fracture
Shikra released post surgi-repair of wing fracture
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Hand-raised parakeets of three species
Hand-raised parakeets of three species

Avian rehabilitation summary for the month of April 2017

Summer creeps in, with a whole of challenges for birds. Our centre received a whopping total of 1685 birds of 34 species. After our annual campaign to save birds that are injured by the sharp, glass powder-coated threads used to fly kites during Uttarayan festival, we thought April would be much less damaging. Sadly, anthropogenic threats are killing birds everyday. We received orphan nestlings, starving fledgelings, injured juveniles, and adults with various ailments. We are never happy to receive so many rescued birds but are satisfied these birds reach our facility mostly in time. We try our best to give them the best shot at life. Majority of the birds were black kites and rock pigeons as they are most abundant in the urban environment. Other species are trying hard to survive in the constantly changing environment thats brings in its share of challenges.

While we received a large variety of birds, our biggest successes were hand-raising 40 orphan parakeets (rose-ringed, plum-headed, and Alexandrine) and 11 house swifts. They were fed species specific formula food until weaned of completely on to their natural diet. The feeding regime was very strictly monitored by our curator. Weight charts were maintained to determine appropriate growth of the birds.Nutritional needs are very different for different species and we take care that birds get what is needed. Our expert staff has been working on developing the right food that aids in proper growth. We also successfully rehabilitated a great white pelican with a fracture (treated with intramedullary pinning), treated several cases of trichomoniasis, and traumas.  

We also received birds with fractures and dislocations, that needed physiotherapy sessions for many days before they could heal fully. Small birds like purple sunbird are very difficult to provide appropriate slings due to their small size. Our team however made a comfortable sling out of medicine boxes!

Several birds came with conditions like dehydration and starvation. Changing urban landscapes are becoming more and more difficult for the birds to survive. Ponds and lakes are being filled up for ‘development’, green cover is reducing, foraging grounds are disappearing. We need to get more and more efficient with our rehabilitation work, as well as our community engagement programs including working with the government.

Thank you for making this possible for us to work for the birds. 

Hand-raised house swifts
Hand-raised house swifts
A purple sunbird with a fractured leg on a sling
A purple sunbird with a fractured leg on a sling
Red-wattled lapwing with dislocated wing
Red-wattled lapwing with dislocated wing
Wild rock pigeons
Wild rock pigeons
Great white pelican being released
Great white pelican being released

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Receiving the injured birds for treatment
Receiving the injured birds for treatment

Respected All Donors,

Jivdaya Charitable Trust is an NGO giving free medical treatment to Sick/Injured animals and birds since 2007. Till date we have treated more than 2,00,000 animals/birds and make them pain free life.

We do a campaign to save the birds during Uttrayan.  Many national and international avian experts join our mission. We have been running this campaign since 2007; thousands of birds of different species including some endangered species are treated every year. Birds data of Uttrayan 2017 are mentioned bellow

BIRDS DATA UTTRAYAN 2017

 

 

TOTAL INWARD BIRDS

3252

DEATH ON ARRIVAL

117

DEAD BIRDS (DURING TREATMENT)

401

BIRDS RELEASED

2468

BIRDS UNDER TREATMENT

269

 

 

SUCCESS RATIO : BIRDS UTTRAYAN 2017

86%

 

 You, the donor, made this happen!

We request and expect your continuous association with our project for multiplying and continuing our work.

For daily updates related to our daily activity, please visit to our face book page,

www.Facebook.com/jivdayatrust

For any quarry feel free to contact to us on our mail id Jivdaya@jivdayatrust.org

Many thanks for your help

Dharmendra Rathod

Manager, JCT  

Primary treatment ( First Aid)
Primary treatment ( First Aid)
Extra Operation table managed for treating birds
Extra Operation table managed for treating birds
Birds in Intensive Care Unit  (after surgery)
Birds in Intensive Care Unit (after surgery)
Aviary for migratory and water birds
Aviary for migratory and water birds
Birds released in natural habitat
Birds released in natural habitat
Birds released in natural habitat-1
Birds released in natural habitat-1
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Organization Information

Jivdaya Charitable Trust

Location: Ahmedabad, Gujarat - India
Website:
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Project Leader:
Jivdaya Charitable Trust JCT
Ahmedabad, gujarat India

Funded Project!

Combined with other sources of funding, this project raised enough money to fund the outlined activities and is no longer accepting donations.
   

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