Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees

by International Humanistic Psychology Association
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Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees
Social Health Care for Healing Syrian Refugees

Even as resources needed to cover the basic out-of-pocket costs of delivering our free services have declined, and the need has increased, our devoted volunteer service team continues to persevere in providing life-saving disaster health care services to the most vulnerable of the refugee population in Jordan – and particularly children.

Successes are seen in the eyes of these children, when they can experience learning again through the elementary school we support, or feel safe and secure living in the apartment building we support that houses more than 40 families made up of refugee widows and their children.

Women’s Safe Space services for women and young girls continue to make use of the services and the secure, supportive setting of the Women’s Safe Spaces we’ve created. Our intent is to establish more of these spaces in more areas of Amman and Irbid, and in other cities.

By setting up virtual stations at these sites, refugees are also able to receive tele-health services when direct in-person access is not possible, and especially during this time when COVID is still widespread throughout Jordan and refugees are especially vulnerable with poor access to local health care services.

Equipping local health care service providers and aid workers with psychosocial skills to help them maintain our services to refugees remains a high priority. Regular skills training continues via both on-site and tele-health training sessions conducted throughout each week by our international expert training faculty.

As we strive to compensate for this time when travel to and throughout Jordan is significantly compromised by the pandemic, the resources needed to gear up and sustain a strong virtual treatment and skills training service to fill the gap are essential to the success of our aid to refugees, and to their future. Healing, recovery, and moving forward in life is precarious on their own, and most notably for children, many of who suffer from profound trauma and loss. 

The need continues to be great, and our services continue to have a concrete and obviously beneficial impact on meeting the critical health care needs of refugee children and their families.

Our ability to maintain these basic disaster health care services to refugees in Jordan is directly based on how much funding support we receive to help cover out-of-pocket costs of getting these services to them. We continue to appeal for the critical financial support of those who can donate the power of their money to the direct costs of our getting these services to those who need it most, and in time.

HOW YOU CAN HELP US MEET THIS NEW CHALLENGE AND MAINTAIN OUR LIFE-SAVING ASSISTANCE:

  • Continue supporting our work with your generous contributions. Every donation amount results in our reaching more children and families to achieve more healing and recovery.
  • Share our story with family, friends, and colleagues to encourage their support by raising awareness of both the need and the concrete good being done.
  • Link our appeal site to your social media sitesand ask others to do the same.
  • Learn if your employment offers matching donations for humanitarian causes to multiply our contributions.

Feel free to contact Steve Olweean, SHC Program Director and IHPA President, with any questions or to share your feedback at: SOlweean@aol.com.

Links:    Program Details at our nonprofit partner site: Common Bond Inst.

Links:

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As our dedicated team has persevered in our efforts to provide life-saving disaster health care services to refugees in Jordan, the challenges to maintain this vital service has only increased over recent months, fueled by an unprecedented and increasing combination of severe threats to life and security for an already vulnerable and highly at risk population. The profound stressors of violence, profound loss, displacement, and resulting trauma for millions of Syrians caused by the Syrian civil war, the daily instability and declining living conditions and poor access to health care as refugees, thedaily instability and declining living conditions and poor access to health care as refugees, and extreme weather conditions, have been added to by the deadly pandemic that has been further devastating this population.

The Impact on Children and Their Families:

The largest segment of the refugee community most susceptible to contracting and becoming disabled or dying from COVID are adults, and particularly the elderly, ill, and immune compromised. However in terms of number, children are by far the largest group within this community, and the most vulnerable to threats to life and welfare over all. A huge and growing number are already suffering from the loss of one or both parents due to the war and poor living conditions, and are left to fend for themselves if no adult is available to care for them. In addition to the tragedy of lost lives, the pandemic deaths are increasingly causing a new wave of orphaned refugee children, putting more and more at even higher risk.

Restrictions on travel and direct access to refugee centers in Jordan due to the pandemic has continued to be significantly limited. At the same time critical health care is needed to help a rapidly expanding infection and mortality rate among refugees, most who are forced to crowd together in close living quarters where physical distancing is not possible. 

Our Current Work:

Addressing this immediate mental health trauma healing and medical need by providing as much critically needed health care as possible during these extraordinary times has required that we concentrate primarily on expanding our tele-health services to reach and care for refugees where they must already congregate.

In line with our goal of local capacity building, we are also expanding on our psycho-social tele-training programs to continue preparing local psychosocial service providers who can help increase and maintain service into the future. This training is generating a growing pool of health service providers equipped with psychosocial support and treatment skills that directly benefits this population, as well as investing in building the capacity of the local mental health service system for all.

Through a partnership we have established with the 5 medical schools in Jordan and Michigan State University Department of Psychiatry, we provide certified training to 5th and 6th year medical students for participating in our skills training program that counts toward their student medical school requirements, further ensuring a growing skill resource among hundreds of local health care providers that can directly benefit refugees in Jordan. Since most of our mental health skills trainees are local medical students and practitioners we are also able to use their medical training to help address COVID related medical needs, including COVID education and guidance for prevention, self-monitoring of health status and symptoms, and alleviating symptoms for those who contract the virus, as well as those suffering from other medical conditions.

Tele-health has rapidly grown in general globally in response to emergency health care needs brought on by the pandemic. Although in-person health care would be more desirable when again available, given the current limited options to rely on for assisting those in such dire need due to the pandemic, and particularly for those in a more marginalized status and lower priority as refugees for receiving resources and services in general, providing as much service as possible through virtual stations established at sites where refugees congregate allows for many to still benefit from our essential disaster health care and support until direct in-person care is again possible.

Until travel restrictions are no longer required, our dedicated team of volunteer expert mental health therapists and local trainees are able to continue our commitment to provide life-sustaining humanitarian health care through establishing and maintaining virtual health care stations in Jordan where we can reach the most people.

Our Current Needs:

We are regularly asked to increase the services and service sites we provide. Success in delivering this involves equipping sites where the refugees live together and congregate with needed virtual technology to receive tele-health services, self monitoring equipment and supplies for keeping track of health status, and medical equipment and supplies for alleviating symptoms of COVID for those infected. These resources needed for each service site include:   

- Virtual technology resources needed are computer equipment, broadband internet service, and IT technical support service.

- Self monitoring and prevention equipment and supplies: no-contact thermometers, oximeters, blood pressure machines, masks, shields, and COVID home tests.

- Medical equipment and supplies needed include equipment that can help support breathing where refugees live, such as oxygen concentrators and CPAP machines, and medications.

Our free services are provided by our dedicated volunteers. The cost of these equipment and supply resources is also increasing, and our ability to continue our work relies on financial support we receive to secure more of the above materials to enable us to continue and further expand our assistance, as we provide life and hope to so many.

Without this, and in the face of now a deadly new life-threatening element to survive that is imposed on them, the future of these refugees, and particularly the majority who are children and women, is now significantly more in question. In the midst of these new challenges there is deep concern about what happens next with this community. At the same time there is also great hope based on our years of success in meeting the needs of these victims of war and displacement.

We have the expert service skills and large pool of amazing volunteer service providers needed to meet this challenge. Our appeal is for the critical financial support of those who can donate the power of their money to the direct costs of our getting these services to those who need it most, and in time.

HOW YOU CAN HELP US MEET THIS NEW CHALLENGE AND MAINTAIN OUR LIFE-SAVING ASSISTANCE:

  • Continue supporting our work with your generous contributions. Every donation amount results in our reaching more children and families to achieve more healing and recovery.
  • Share our story with family, friends, and colleagues to encourage their support by raising awareness of both the need and the concrete good being done.
  • Link our appeal site to your social media sites and ask others to do the same.
  • Learn if your employment offers matching donations for humanitarian causes to multiply our contributions.

Feel free to contact Steve Olweean, SHC Program Co-Director and IHPA President, or Myron Eshowsky, SHC Program Co-Director, with any questions or to share your feedback at: SOlweean@aol.com.

Links:

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As Syrian refugee children and their families in Jordan continue to struggle in recovering from the devastating war, violence, and profound loss caused by the Syrian civil war, they are now faced with yet additional life-threatening conditions that place them at even higher risk for survival in the form of a deadly and unpredictable pandemic, and drastic weather change.

The three catastrophic dangers combining to magnify and undermine the day to day struggle for survival are:

  • 10 1/2 years of unending community wide psycho-social trauma due to the civil war and forced displacement that has impacted hundreds of thousands of refugees in Jordan;
  • the lethal pandemic now approaching 2 years - most immediately the deadly new wave of the COVID delta variant that is rapidly sweeping across much of the Middle East, where most refugees are forced to live in crowded conditions with little or no ability to physically distance, not vaccinated due to a scarcity of vaccines in the country, and invariably at a low priority for medical care if contracting the virus.
  • and an accelerating and unrelenting weather crisis that is causing increasing, persistent, and unbearably high levels of heat and draught - with record breaking temperatures of upward to 125 degrees - that places those living in unprotected tents and crowded residential settings at highest risk of illness and death.

Over this time, and faced with these immense, accumulating, and shifting challenges, we have worked to continually adjust our service responses to these catastrophic conditions. The unique limitations caused by the pandemic in particular requires even more time and energy on the part of our dedicated, all volunteer service team to continue our life-saving help.

In response we have been focusing our efforts on expanding on our ability to provide services to refugees virtually that address the increasing suffering caused by the unprecedented convergence of these combined threats to life through:

  • Reaching out to isolated refugee centers to maintain supportive contact and health care services.
  • Providing equipment and supplies to enable these centers to link with virtual tele-health services from our disaster health care service providers.
  • Expanding our disaster aid to include providing COVID medical health services, and guidance on how to mitigate the medical effects of extreme weather.
  • Reorganizing and adapting our local capacity building psycho-social treatment skills training program for local health care providers - including through our partnership with the 5 medical schools in Jordan raining their 5th and 6th year medical students – to help build a pool of local skilled service providers who can increasingly maintain and further expand these services to assist larger numbers of children and their families.

The costs of maintaining and further expanding these services is increasing as well, due to the technology equipment, and supplies required, as we are also striving to generate more donations that allow us to continue carrying on our work in meeting these emergency needs of refugee children and their families.
And so a central and critical component of this work continuing and more lives being saved is the financial support of those who lend the power of their donations to this humanitarian effort.

In the midst of these multiple, compounding threats to life and wellbeing there is deepening alarm that an even greater humanitarian catastrophe is on the verge of erupting, if help doesn’t arrive in time.

Children born at the beginning of this humanitarian crisis in 2011 are now over 10 years old. They have never known any life other than that of a refugee living a precarious and profoundly bleak daily life, isolated from the mainstream of society, and with little light at the end of the tunnel for a better life in the coming years - unless we continue and increase our help.

There is however practical hope, and based on our track record of many years of clear results in meeting critical healing and recovery needs under extraordinary conditions, a proven path to effectively assisting those caught up in this tragedy.

Our services have been successfully making a concrete difference in the lives of thousands of these children and their families people for years, and we continue to provide the ability for coping, healing, recovery. and the promise of a better future. We have the expert service skills, important local partners to collaborate with, and a large and growing pool of dedicated volunteer service providers - through our team both within Jordan and internationally – that enable us to deliver the means for achieving this better future.

Our appeal is for the critical financial support of those who can donate the power of their money to the direct costs of our getting these services to those who need it most, and in time.

HOW YOU CAN HELP US MEET THIS NEW CHALLENGE AND MAINTAIN OUR LIFE-SAVING ASSISTANCE:

  • Continue supporting our work with your generous contributions. Every donation amount results in our reaching more children and families to achieve more healing and recovery.
  • Share our story with family, friends, and colleagues to encourage their support by raising awareness of both the need and the concrete good being done.
  • Link our appeal site to your social media sites and ask others to do the same.
  • Learn if your employment offers matching donations for humanitarian causes to multiply our contributions.

Feel free to contact Steve Olweean, SHC Program Director and IHPA President, with any questions or to share your feedback at: SOlweean@aol.com

Links: Program Details at our nonprofit partner site: Common Bond Inst.

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Social Health Care program
Social Health Care program

The state of refugees in Jordan has been dire for now 10 years of the Syrian civil war. During this time they have endured multiple injuries and stressors throughout their day to day lives. In direct response since the beginning of the Syrian refugee crisis our disaster health care humanitarian assistance services have also successfully operated throughout this same period of time, providing life saving healing services that have been steadily improving the lives of so many.

Facing A New Challenge

However the landscape in Jordan and the world has recently change dramatically and is endangering this progress. For more than a year the COVID-19 pandemic has born down heavily on this large already highly at-risk refugee community in Jordan, and this threat is only increasing day to day as the pandemic surges in the region with both COVID-19 and the newest even more infectious variants. Tragically, the virus is spreading most quickly with significantly higher mortality rates within this underserved community of people who have lost everything over these 10 painful years due to the war and violence in Syria.

As the entire country of Jordan is experiencing this continuing crisis and health care services are stretched to the limit, the refugees who have consistently been at the end of the line for receiving health services now face even more dire threats to their lives and well-being.

Most at risk continue to be children and women, who make up the large majority of the refugee population, and the pandemic has only increased the degree of danger and loss these most vulnerable members of the refugee community face. As one example, most children have only one parent – in most cases a widowed mother who herself is on her own, and often no parenbt at all. These children are under the care of their one parent or, in the case of losing both parents, have been taken into the care of another family that in most cases is also headed by a widowed mother.

As the pandemic is causing the death of more adult refugees who are the primary care givers for increasing numbers of young children who have lost one or both parents, this already precarious family support structure is now collapsing, creating a rapidly escalating crisis leaving mounting numbers of vulnerable and young children, who have been suffering years of trauma and loss, without any reliable adult care, support, or protection. The consequences are rapidly leading to yet another even graver level of humanitarian crisis that will have a devastating, long term, and likely permanent impact on an entire next generation within the Syrian refugee population, unless we can respond now and adequately.

Our Current Work:

The challenge for our team has been to continue providing our critical disaster health care services within the extraordinary limitations on our physical access to refugees in the community that are imposed on us by the pandemic. The focus of our efforts has also had to necessarily expand significantly to address both the psycho-emotional trauma of these victims of war and now this immediate specific medical danger to an already endangered population created by the expanding pandemic crisis that has left them highly vulnerable and their lives phenomenally even more at risk. We are fortunate in that most of our local team members and trainees in Jordan are medical students and professionals who can also contribute their medical skills in addressing the pandemic.

With the greatly appreciated funding support of those who are moved to help us in these life saving efforts, we have been diligenly working to gradually increase the needed communication technology at as many service sites in Jordan as we can. This equipment and internet service is needed to allow our international and local treatment team supported by our local mental health trainees to connect virtually with large groups of refugees located across the country – refugees who are already required to live and interact in large groups with no ability to physical distance – to provide critically needed tele-health services.

Even as our amazing local team members and trainees themselves are also struggling with the impact of the pandemic on their personal lives, they remain committed and dedicated to their role as disaster health care providers for those in such desperate need.

Our Current Needs:

As we diligently continue to provide services as much as possible our largest and most consistent resource is the resource of our expert trauma treatment team and our health care trainees, all of who are volunteers.
Our most challenging imitations in continuing our regular direct treatment services, and in adapting to the most recent unique challenges and barriers imposed by the pandemic, are in the hard resources simply needed to do our work.

Equipment and adequate high-speed broadband internet service are expensive, and our resources are always stretched to secure more technology for both equipping more sites and maintain the existing sites we’ve equipped.

Over these same 10 years, our continuing services have made a concrete difference for thousands of refugees in Jordan we have assisted in alleviating and healing the trauma of war, violence, and profound loss. We know that with our access to those experiencing such harm and losson many levels, with the treatment skills of our dedicated psychosocial service providers, and with the materials, equipment, and supplies needed to provide this service, healing and lasting recovery is achieved and is clearly possible. We have consistently witnessed this year to year. 

Without this, and in the face of now a deadly new life-threatening element to survive that is imposed on them, the future of these refugees, and particularly the majority who are children and women, is now significantly more in question.

In the midst of these new challenges there is deep concern about what happens next with this community. At the same time there is also great hope based on our years of success in meeting the needs of these victims of war.

We have the expert service skills and large pool of service providers needed to meet this challenge.
Our appeal is for the critical financial support of those who can donate to the direct costs of our actually getting these services to those who need it.

HOW YOU CAN HELP US MEET THIS NEW CHALLENGE AND MAINTAIN OUR LIFE-SAVING ASSISTANCE:

  • Continue supporting our work with your generous contributions. Every donation amount results in our reaching more children and families to achieve more healing and recovery.
  • Share our story with family, friends, and colleagues to encourage their support by raising awareness of both the need and the concrete good being done.
  • Link our appeal site to your social media sites and ask others to do the same.
  • Learn if your employment offers matching donations for humanitarian causes to multiply our contributions.

Feel free to contact Steve Olweean, SHC Program Director and IHPA President, with any questions or to share your feedback at: SOlweean@aol.com.

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

Over these last few months the prolonged violence, loss, and ever mounting displacement due to the ongoing civil conflicts within Syria have only served to generate more victims who flee to Jordan for sanctuary, further swelling the massive number of refugees languishing there now for well over 9 years, with no end in sight for their dilemma.

The compounding challenges for these refugees struggling daily with multiple threats to their health, safety, and security, and profound loss, has been phenomenal; while at the same time the pandemic has continued to significantly strain our limited resources needed to carry on our psycho-social treatment and recovery services to this increasingly high risk community.
This is particularly true for the most at-risk members of the refugee population – children and women.

As such the number of those in desperate need is rapidly mounting as direct in-person services from humanitarian aid organizations has drastically diminished across the board in the region.

Throughout this time the services of the Social Health Care (SHC) treatment program has fortunately persevered in continuing to assist these refugees in Jordan, primarily thanks to the dedication of our amazing volunteer local and international service team. Our team is made up of expert psychosocial trauma therapists, medical professionals, social workers, and teachers, all who volunteer their time, skills, and hearts to this work. Within the travel and direct contact limits imposed by the pandemic, this commitment is making the difference in making it possible to provide vital life-saving treatment services to those most vulnerable through enhanced tele-health, and keeping hope alive until we can fully re-establish our in-person on-site services that have aided refugees since 2011.

As part of this current work, resources are increasingly required to provide tele-communication technology to establish and maintain virtual stations at residential sites in Jordan housing large numbers of refugees allowing access to our team, medical equipment and supplies provided to each site that enable refugees we serve to regularly self-monitor and receive targeted medical guidance, health care, and support from our health care providers, and self-help skills training to support their ability to cope with crisis conditions on multiple levels, and support each other in doing so.

Both providing victims of trauma and loss with the psychosocial trauma treatment - and now COVID-19 health care, and also equipping them with the personal coping and self-care skills to enable them to take an active part in their own individual and communal healing recovery, is at the center of our service philosophy. This approach is consistently proving to be highly successful in helping to achieve healing and recovery, and the generous support of our donors helps to make this possible.

While our devoted service team that is capable of reaching more and more refugees continues to grow and be available to steadily expand on our overall potential for services, due to the increased cost of computer communications equipment, on-going technical services, and medical devices required to reach and maintain treatment and support contact with refugees at multiple locations across Jordan during this extraordinary period, our limited funding resources are necessarily consumed by these technical costs.

Each donation helps to overcome these limitations placed on our services due to lack of funding, to sustain and make these direct services immediately available to more of the most vulnerable and at-risk – the children and women who make up the large majority of the refugee population.

Your continued donations are immensely appreciated and crucial to continuing our humanitarian work, and to the healing of so many.

HOW YOU CAN HELP MAINTAIN OUR LIFE-SAVING ASSISTANCE:

  • Continue supporting our work with your generous contributions. Every donation amount results in our reaching more children and families to achieve more healing and recovery.
  • Share our story with family, friends, and colleagues to encourage their support by raising awareness of both the need and the concrete good being done.
  • Link our appeal site to your social media sites and ask others to do the same.
  • Learn if your employment offers matching donations for humanitarian causes to multiply our contributions.

Feel free to contact Steve Olweean with any questions or to share your feedback at: SOlweean@aol.com.

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
 

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Organization Information

International Humanistic Psychology Association

Location: Climax, Michigan - USA
Website:
Project Leader:
Steve Olweean
Climax, Michigan United States
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