Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania

by Girls Education International
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Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Dibeit visits a child in the pediatric ward
Dibeit visits a child in the pediatric ward

Dear Project Wezesha Supporters,

In this report, we'd love to share some updates from Dibeit, who is studying clinical medicine at Mbeya College of Health Science, a branch of the University of Dodoma. His program of study is three years long and he is thrilled about the road ahead.

Dibeit has already made great strides and has been recognized for his hard work. Check out this amazing update he sent last week:

Today, I have been selected by a team of doctors and students to be a the Class Representative. It's because of your pure heart and struggle. This is your honor. Asante!

Wow! We're so proud of Dibeit, and to be honest - we're not surprised about this honor. Anyone who has met Dibeit can imagine how he came to be the class representative. He is one of the most charismatic, supportive, and entertaining young men I know.

In an earlier message, I asked Dibeit to give us some news from his new life at University. This is what he shared:

Dear Rai, I would like to thank you together with our donors in Project Wezesha. I'm feeling happy to tell you that since I started to take clinical medicine at Mbeya College of Health Science, my experience in medicine has become very big. Of course, university life is very nice. We study in deep about human health and medical treatment. Also, we always use computer and Internet to approach the medical field.

We have good lectures, good zonal referral hospital with fully equipped departments; we are free to visit patients any time after class hours. I have visited the children’s department, to learn about disease which mostly affect children under 5 years as an assignment group.

Also we have 15 periods per week. Our lessons are based mostly in practicals. For example, we practice how to talk with patients of different ages ethically and professionally. We study privately and in groups, especially during night. We also make epidemiological research, especially in communicable diseases like cholera and many others.

These are just few examples about my medical progression this first semester, but we have more than that, and we remain with two months to complete first semester. In waiting for second semester, I hope Project Wezesha will continue to support us for the coming semester. I'm working hard because my dream is to become specialist in medicine and I have a photo of some of my studies. Thank you very much. -Dibeit.

As the pictures show, this program doesn't waste any time before getting students into the hospitals (in their white coats!), working with patients and connecting theory and practice. We are still chipping away at the university fees we owe for this second semester for Dibeit, Tumsifu, and Saidi. 

If you believe in these young men, as well as our other Project Wezesha students who will hopefully follow in their footsteps, please consider sharing this update, encouraging friends to donate, and making a contribution today. 

Asante Sana!

Thank you, very much!

Rai Farrelly
Co-Founder
Project Wezesha

Dibeit studying with classmates
Dibeit studying with classmates
Dibeit with a classmate
Dibeit with a classmate
Dibeit (in yellow) with classmates
Dibeit (in yellow) with classmates
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Dibeit and Tumsifu at Graduation
Dibeit and Tumsifu at Graduation

Dear Project Wezesha Supporters,

The time has finally come for our first scholarship students to really spread their wings and take flight into higher education! We are so proud of Tumsifu, Dibeit and Saidi for completing Form 6 and doing well enough on their exit examinations to join universities in Tanzania.

Dibeit and Tumsifu are both interested in studying medicine. Their long-term goals are to become surgeons. In particular, they both shared their unique interests in maternal health care. It's not surprising since they both come from small villages in Western Tanzania where the incidence of maternal and/or infant mortality are high. It has historically been difficult for women to get to the hospital to deliver their babies and when certain complications arise, even the best midwife loses patients. Fortunately, development is spreading in Tanzania, so transportation options are increasing from villages into town hospitals.

In 2015, a dear friend in Mgaraganza village--one of the most respected midwives in the area--was delivering the twin babies of her own daughter. Unfortunately, after many hours in labor in the village, the babies were not coming. They made their way to the hospital, which took a long time given the late hour and lack of transportation. At the hospital, the mother and both babies died. This was my friend's first loss ever after having delivered hundreds of babies ... and it was her own daughter and grandchildren.

It's stories like this one that have moved Dibeit and Tumsifu to explore medicine. They both have dreams of using their medical expertise to help their families and their communities. In the attached video, Dibeit introduces himself, explains the motivations behind his passion for medicine, and expresses his gratitude to those who support him.

Saidi is equally passionate about a much different field--Economics. Saidi's mother and father live at their farm, hours away from Saidi's home. They work year-round to feed their children and meet basic needs (clothing, education, healthcare). Saidi’s grandparents are the primary caregivers so that his parents can cultivate in another region. Saidi's father made this sacrifice because he has always been an advocate for his children when it comes to education. In some of our early years when we were unable to cover the entire cost of Saidi's private school fees, Saidi's father paid half, even though he didn't have much money.

Saidi is motivated to study Economics because he wants to be able to provide support and education to individuals who are developing financial literacy and seeking to rise out of poverty. He wants to help people learn to invest and save their money to strengthen the wider society. In the attached video, Saidi offers an example of why he has chosen this educational path.

Another one of our recent Form 4 graduates, Mahamudu is opting to attend the Royal Training Institute in Dar Es Salaam. He will take part in a one-year certificate program in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Mahamudu is focused on his career and knows this is the path he wishes to pursue. Pharmacists, like bankers, have great prospects of finding work in cities and towns across the country. We're happy to support Mahamudu in this fast track to a great career.

The fees associated with sending these young men to university are the highest we have incurred in our work thus far, but because we know these young men so well and believe in the impact they will make on their society, we are committed to supporting them. And we need your help!

University fees include the cost of accommodation, books, insurance, field research, library services, examination fees, uniforms, and much more. Tuition at any university incorporates a range of services received on campus - including health clinics, wifi, teacher salaries, building maintenance, etc. The programs our students wish to attend have reasonable fees, averaging $2,500 per student per year. If you would like to directly sponsor Dibeit, Tumsifu, Saidi or Mahamudu -- please let us know! If you can make a contribution today that we will divide among them, that's great too!

Please keep up with our work on our website and on Facebook. Consider sharing this report through your social media outlets via the sharing buttons below. And let us know if there are ways you'd like to be involved as a volunteer, as a fundraiser, as a sponsor!

Asante sana from the students and all of us at Project Wezesha!

With gratitude,

Rai Farrelly

Mwalimu Dibeit teaching at Study Camp
Mwalimu Dibeit teaching at Study Camp
Mahamudu_Future Pharmacist!
Mahamudu_Future Pharmacist!

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Project Wezesha Group
Project Wezesha Group

Greetings Project Wezesha Supporters,

I had the great pleasure to spend part of May and June in Tanzania with our students and parters in Kigoma. I'm delighted to share some updates, stories, and photos. Please make sure to visit us on Facebook to see even more photos and videos!

Project Wezesha Recognized by the Government of Tanzania

First, we're happy to report that we have registered Project Wezesha as a nonprofit organization with the governent of Tanzania (see attached photo). This decision was made so that we could additionally request for funding support from the Tanzanian government to accomplish such tasks as buying desks and chairs, finishing our STEM labs, and building additional toilets at Amahoro Secondary School. This will allow us to focus our international fundraising on our study camps and scholarship program.

We also received a lovely letter (see attached) from the Ministry of Education in Tanzania acknowledging us for the construction of Amahoro Secondary School, which was built for and with the communities in and surrounding Mgaraganza Village. After many years of working in this region, it is very validating for Lucas and me to be acknolwedged by a government entity for our project - a project we couldn't have completed without your support!

Another Successful Study Camp

For the month of June, our students came back to Kigoma to board at Kichangachui Secondary School for Study Camp. The headmaster of the school - our partner and friend Charles - allowed us to convert two classrooms into dorm rooms (one for girls, one for boys). We also had the opportunity to use his classrooms and science labs for our students. We are indebted to Charles for his generosity and collaboration. I had the opportunity to meet with his female students (Form 2 and 4) to inspire them to continue with their educational endeavors with enthusiasm, determination, confidence, and an eye on justice for themselves and Tanzania broadly.

We hired the lovely Mama Amina for the second time to be our head cook and the "madam" on duty who stayed with our girls at night. The girls love her. She offered critical emotional and health-based support for some of our girls during the month. Many of our students are Muslim; Ramadan, a holy month of fasting, ocurred during our camp. As such, our Muslim students ate before sunrise and after sunset. Mama Amina made sure that food was set aside for these students so they could stay nourished through Ramadan. We also hired an assistant cook because the job of feeding 45 students three times a day was quite demanding. Both Mama Amina and Furaha were happy to support our camp and make money doing so! Mama Amina spent some of her salary on her family's Eid al Fitr celebration at the end of Ramadan.

Before camp started, we met with all the teachers to coordinate schedules and make sure that the students had ample time to engage with each of their subjects: Chemistry, Biology, Math, History, Geography, Swahili, and English. This year, we hired teachers from Kichangachui and Amahoro Secondary Schools. They all have subject matter expertise and experience preparing students for national exams. Our students and I were excited that we had two women teaching in camp this time -- Monica, a biology teacher from Amahoro Secondary School and Fedha, our Swahili teacher. We were also delighted that our students could have practical science lab experience (see photo), which most of them don't get at their regular schools.

Our Second Round of High School Students

Some of our recent Form 4 graduates passed their national examinations with scores that secured their place in Form 5 classes (i.e., High School). We're happy to be supporting Ezra, George, Simoni, and Waridi as they prepare for High School, which starts next month. Part of that support included special tutoring hours during June to prepare for their upcoming subjects. We also bought scientific calculators and textbooks. These young men are planning to study challenging combinations including PCB (Physics, Chem, Bio) and PBM (Physics, Bio, Math). Our continuing high schooler, Albert continues in Form 6 this year - aiming for a strong finish with hopes of joing our university crew next year.

Our first University Students!!

Dibeit, Tumsifu and Saidi completed Form 6 in May. We will get their exam results any day now. Once we have the results, we'll be able to plan for their next big step - into University! Both Dibeit and Tumsifu have plans to study medicine with a focus on women's health. They have each been moved by the senseless deaths of women in their villages during childbirth. They want to specialize in surgery related to childbirth to contribute as best they can to a decrease in women and infant mortality. They are hoping to study abroad, but we'll have to see what support we can muster to help make this happen. Saidi is planning to attend a university in Tanzania to pursue a career in Economics - banking, accounting, investments.

In the meantime, we hired Dibeit, Tumsifu and Saidi to teach in our study camp this June. The students commended them on their teaching style and deep knowledge of Chemistry, Biology, Physics, and Geography. We're so proud to see how far they've come since they were selected for our scholarship program upon completion of elementary school (6 years ago!).

Will you help us continue this work?

At the moment, our projected budget includes another Study Camp in December, tutoring support for the girls who will be taking Form 4 examinations in October, school fees for the boys in Form 5 and Form 6, and of course, fees associated with supporting Dibeit, Tumsifu and Saidi as they head into University. Study Camp alone costs $3700. Form 5 fees are $300 per student. University fees are yet to be determined, but they will likely be around $2500-3000 if they all stay in Tanzania.

Now, more than ever, we'd love your continued support! Please share this report and other information about Project Wezesha with your friends and family. (Handy sharing buttons below.) Let them know about the work we're doing, our firsthand approach to sharing updates with you, and why you believe supporting us matters.

Please reach out to me personally if you have ideas for fundraisers that you'd like to launch. We are especially interested in motivating students to support students, so if you are a teacher, know a teacher or have a child in school - let's talk! Schools for Schools is rewarding for everyone involved!

And of course, we'd be grateful for any monetary contribution you can make at this time. Simply click "Give Now" below - any amount helps.

Asante sana (Thank you very much),

Raichle (Rai) Farrelly
Co-Founder, Project Wezesha
info@girlsed.org

Project Wezesha Boys
Project Wezesha Boys
Form 4 Girls in Science Lab
Form 4 Girls in Science Lab
On our Field Trip to Gombe National Park
On our Field Trip to Gombe National Park
Civil Society Registration
Civil Society Registration
Letter from Ministry of Education
Letter from Ministry of Education
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Fritz Speaking to Amahoro Secondary Students
Fritz Speaking to Amahoro Secondary Students

Dear Project Wezesha Supporters,

Happy Spring to all of you! We are delighted to share a few updates about Project Wezesha supporters as well as highlights about some of our students. We also hope to secure your continued support as we celebrate the acceptance of some of our students into advanced programs of study.

A Little Help From My Friends

Project Wezesha was founded when Lucas and I responded to a request for support from the chief of Mgaraganza village: Can you help us build a secondary school? Of we course we said yes, but we then had to come up with funds. We raised money little by little. But then - a miracle! Our miracle was Shelmina Babai and Minaz Abji. These two remarkable souls, born and raised in Tanzania and Uganda respectively, were set to marry. They desired nothing more from their wedding guests than contributions to Project Wezesha so we could construct Amahoro Secondary School. Their aim was to honor their fathers through this amazing gift.

The generous donations of Shelmina, Minaz, their family and friends enabled us to lay foundations for 12 classrooms, build walls, and install rooves. Over the years, Shelmina and Minaz have continued to support Project Wezesha. Our last hurdle before opening the school was construction of student latrines -- Shelmina made that happen! For the opening ceremony in January 2015, Shelmina contributed to make sure the celebration would be inclusive of everyone - they 'chipped in' to feed the entire village!

This year on March 26th, I finally had the great pleasure of meeting Shelmina and Minaz (see photo) for the first time ever. While I was with them, I felt that I was in the presence of pure goodness and love. I have always been in awe of their generousity, yet they celebrated me for the opportunity I gave them. If I could manifest a world filled with hope, love, kindness and opportunity - it would surely be inspired by Shelmina and Minaz. Please take a moment to learn more about Shelmina here. She is a true inspiration!

Serendipitous Encounters

Through a series of random Facebook encounters, I met a man named Fritz from Germany who was making his way to Tanzania with his sons. He had spent time in Kigoma in the 80s and was now returning, with hopes of visiting Gombe National Park. In time, we had arranged for Lucas to meet him and escort him to Gombe and take him to visit the school in Mgaraganza. After his visit, he said that the trip to the school and village was the highlight of his trip. The photos show him speaking to the entire student body at Amahoro Secondary School. We are grateful to him for making the time to visit and speak with our students. Lucas was inspired by conversations he had with Fritz's sons and we were touched when they made a donation upon leaving.

Celebrating Our Students' Success

We are excited to report on the examination and placement results for some of our current students. As we celebrate their successes, we must also acknowledge that there is a cost to success--tuition bills! Now more than ever, we need your continued support. Here's why:

George is joining a technician certificate program in nursing and pharmaceutical sciences. It is a two-year program with costs ranging from 3,000,000 Tsh per year ($1350/yr). Intakes for the program are in April and September. Given our current finanical situation, we will be aiming for a September start.

Mahamudu and Ezekial qualified to join a basic technician certificate program in pharmaceutical technology. These fees will begin at 2,000,000 Tsh per year ($900/yr).

Ezra and Waridi qualified to join Form 5 in government schools. The fees for the first year are 700,000 Tsh each ($314 ea.). Form 6 fees drop to 150,000Tsh; however, they will require participation in school-based academic support during December and June costing 1,000,000 Tsh each ($450 ea.).

As you can imagine, we are so thrilled that these young men from remote villages have done so well in their studies and will continue their studies with peers in healthcare-related certificate programs and Form 5 respectively. Now we ask your support to ensure that we can help them stay on track and achieve their goals of becoming health professionals in Tanzania.

June Study Camp

Our final update is that we are happily offering our study camp again in June 2017. The success of our first study camp in December was so great on many levels. The students, teachers and parents were thrilled by the contribution this intensive academic program made to our students' confidence, English language proficiency, and content knowledge. We have attached the budget for the camp, drafted by Lucas and Madaga. As you will see, the cost for the 30-day camp for all students is $3700. Project Wezesha and Girls Education International will strive to raise these funds by our June 3rd start date. We hope you will consider chipping in!

Lucas, Madaga and I are committed to our young friends in Mgaraganza and surrounding villages. We are deeply grateful for your support of our work. Please consider sharing this update with friends, invite them to like our Facebook page, and visit our website as a way of joining us on this journey.

Sincerely,

Rai Farrelly
Co-Founder

Shelmina, Rai, & Minaz
Shelmina, Rai, & Minaz
Lucas & Jane host Fritz and his family
Lucas & Jane host Fritz and his family

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Students Playing on the Weekend_Study Break!
Students Playing on the Weekend_Study Break!

Happy New Year Project Wezesha Supporters!

We wrapped up 2016 with a really cool pilot project that we're excited to tell you all about.

As most of you have learned through these reports, education in government village schools is readily available, but not always of the same quality as that experienced by the youth in urban government schools or private schools. The short list of reasons includes lack of support for ongoing teacher training, limited English proficiency of teachers and students, lack of educational resources (e.g., laboratories, textbooks, maps, technology), and long walking commutes to schools with no meals provided on site (i.e., hunger, diminished attention spans).

For quite some time, Lucas and I have puzzled over what we can do to build on classroom-based learning. For the past few years, we have been providing additional tutoring for our students between terms and after school, especially for those struggling in particular subjects. The students are always grateful, but it still didn't seem like it was having enough of an impact. Students continued to struggle in classes and some weren't finishing secondary school with marks high enough to get them into high school or vocational school.

This year, Lucas and our dear friend and fellow educator, Madaga, collaborated to develop a study camp to fill the time between school years. Following a brief break at the end of the school year, students from both the Project Wezesha and Girls Education International scholarship programs took part in a rigorous 30-day academic camp during which they engaged in the following activities:

  • 6:30am jog followed by showers and breakfast
  • 7:15am morning meeting, during which students took turns reporting in English on a topic of their choice. They have spoken on the environment, family, managing waste, student motivation, and more!
  • 7:30am start time to their classes, in which they studied English, Biology, Chemistry and Math - the subjects that generally present the most difficulty to all students
  • Midday lunch and rest
  • Afternoon classes followed by evening student-led discussion groups
  • Group dinner, then deep sleep!

Our students were transported into Kigoma town for the study camp, so they live in dorms at the host school. The participating teachers are teachers from town who use technology (including YouTube videos and projectors) to help make concepts clear. The headmaster of the host school has been so supportive of this project - he turns up each day to see how the students are doing, to encourage them, and to make sure Lucas and Madaga don't have any unmet needs.

Midway through the study camp, our students' parents traveled from the villages to visit their children, listen to updates from teachers and speeches from the organizers (Lucas and Madaga), and get a sense of the overall impact of this opportunity. They are immensely grateful for the support we've been able to provide, thanks to you!

In addition to the study camp, we have additional brief updates that we'll elaborate on in the coming months. One of our students, Diana, has been working as an assistant in a lawyer's office, but she is ready to start her own business. Khadija and Hindu are rounding the ben on their work contracts in Oman and will be returning to Tanzania to start their own business as a team. We'll helping all three of these girls through mini-capital campaigns to help them buy the equipment they need to get started. Our student Ismael is starting his final year at the vocational school in Kigoma where he has been studying driving and car mechanics.

We also launched a last minute holiday campaign in a response to a desperate plea from the leaders of Mgaraganza Village. They had no funds to buy desks and chairs for the incoming freshman at Amahoro Secondary School - 160 new students! This is, of course, a government expense, but while the government was quick to place 160 new students, it was not so quick to send funds to provide them seating. We have comitted to providing 50 desks and chairs, but the more we raise, the more we will provide. We are so grateful to those who responded immediately to the rally cry and helped us raise just over $1,000 in 48 hours so that Lucas could rush to the carpenter and put in an order in time for the start of the school year in mid January.

As ever, we are very grateful for the support you have provided along the way to help make all of this happen. Thanks to the speed with which technology is reacing all corners of the world, I now get What's App messages from Lucas, Madaga and several of our students regularly! I feel the impact of our work daily through their words and pictures. Please know that what is happening in this community thanks to the work of Project Wezesha ... well, it's powerful! The ripples may be small, but they are increasing in size and frequency! Imagine, an entire collective of small villages knows that a group of grassroots donors working through Project Wezesha has got their back--cares about their young people, and therefore their community!

I'll continue to share the updates, but make sure to also like us on Facebook so you can keep up with periodic updates and see more photos and videos. Keep an eye open for invitations to take on your own mini-projects in the coming months!

Use the sharing buttons below and help us spread the word. A little goes a long way!

Asante Sana,

Rai Farrelly & Lucas Lameck
Co-founders, Project Wezesha
www.projectwezesha.org

Morning Meeting_Giving Speeches in English
Morning Meeting_Giving Speeches in English
Measuring Learning through Periodic Assessments
Measuring Learning through Periodic Assessments
Lunch Time - even Madaga and Lucas help serve
Lunch Time - even Madaga and Lucas help serve
Student leading discussion seminar
Student leading discussion seminar
Village Leaders Requesting Funds for Desks
Village Leaders Requesting Funds for Desks

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Organization Information

Girls Education International

Location: Boulder, CO - USA
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @girlsed
Project Leader:
Rai Farrelly
Co-Founder, Project Wezesha; Executive Director, Girls Education International
Boulder, CO United States
$40,196 raised of $75,000 goal
 
392 donations
$34,804 to go
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