Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania

by Girls Education International
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Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Post-Secondary Education for Students in Tanzania
Mayani
Mayani

Dear Project Wezesha Supporters, 

Our last cohort of students is in the Study Camp right now, wrapping up another 4-week intensive program under the supervision of our Education Coordinator, Madaga. We're grateful once again to the amazing teachers who are working through their school break to ensure that our students are prepared for their examinations in October. Every one of our Study Camp students are in Form 4, so they are all setting their sights on performing well on the exams so they have the option to attend high school in the coming year. 

We took the time to sit down with many of our Project Wezesha students and conduct interviews about their goals, the role of education in society, and their appreciation for the support of donors. In this video, we speak with Mayani and Hamisi, two of our young men who performed well on national exams in 2018. They are both starting High School this month!! We wish them well as they both pursue their dreams of becoming doctors. Mayani even aims to become a surgeon! He knows what he's in for -- time, dedication, money -- but he wants nothing more than to make an impact and to save the lives of those who don't have immediate access to quality healthcare in the remote regions of Tanzania. 

Please continue to offer your support to this fund. We are seeing an increase in costs as our students continue to move through secondary school and into high school. In about one year, some of our students will be seeking support to go to University, and that support comes from this campaign! Help us see another round of students into and through higher education, to follow in the footsteps of Dibeit, Tumsifu, Saidi and Mahamudu who are all in year three of university studies thanks to you! 

Asante Sana,

Rai Farrelly & Lucas Lameck
Co-founders, Project Wezesha

Hamisi
Hamisi

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Dibeit retrieving medical supplies
Dibeit retrieving medical supplies

Greetings Project Wezesha Supporters,

Lots of news to share in this report!

Our Star Med Student

To start, here’s a note from our student, Dibeit who is in his second year of Medical School (See pictures of Dibeit in his field placements, with his classmates.)

I was providing health education at Simbega Secondary School in Iyula Village together with a team from our college. We were teaching the effects of early pregnancy and HIV/AIDS to teenage students. It was a good program, and the headmaster and teachers were very happy -- and students, too! One of the girl students stood at assembly after our program and said, “Thanks for education, thanks for visiting us; we promise we will practice because we need our dreams become true.” I was very happy to hear that from a Form 2 student. She motivated us to continue our program with other schools and villagers. 

Supporting Kiza -- On the Path to Becoming a Teacher

We were also happy to reconnect with our student Kiza who completed secondary school in 2016. She didn’t pass the national exams in 2016, but her father supported her to continue her education, to keep working toward her goals. She ultimately passed her examinations and was accepted into Teacher’s College. The story is not straightforward (read it in her words here), but it ends well! Girls Education International is adding Kiza to the list of young women supported through the post-secondary education campaign! We’re thrilled that Kiza will reach her goal, to be a teacher – inspired by the support her mother gave her in primary school.

December in Tanzania

In December, we had an amazing trip to Tanzania. Executive Director Rai Farrelly with friends and long time Project Wezesha supporters, Patsy, Katia and Shelly spent time with Lucas, Madaga and our students in Kigoma. We celebrated Christmas with our Study Camp students at Gordon’s Beach on the shores of Lake Tanganyika. We had a wonderful Christmas dinner, made with love by Lucas’ wife. We also visited children Rai supports at a local children’s home.

Patsy, Shelly and all donors were celebrated in a huge festival with dinner, sodas, a dj, dancing, skits, and speeches. Find attached the heartfelt speech that Madaga delivered! 

We conducted interviews with our students and will be sharing those videos in coming months as we edit the footage. 

Success on National Exams -- Time for High School!

Hamisi and Mayani were two of our recent Form 4 graduates who took their national exams in November. We just received word in February that they both passed the exams and will be admitted to high school. They both want to pursue a medical path, so they will study with a CBG concentration (Chemistry, Biology, Geography).

In addition to these young men, the following young women supported by Girls Ed and Project Wezesha passed their national exams! We couldn’t be more proud because we know their success is due to their efforts, their family’s support, the work of teachers in our study camps, and the relentless dedication of Lucas and Madaga to ensure they excel! Congratulations to all of you!

Hekima, Adija, Sania, Remence, Mariselina, Sajida, Sarafina, Saidati, Furaha, Secilia, & Bernadeta

Asante Sana & Thank You Very Much

We’ll share more updates in our next report, including the status of our other scholarship students in higher education -- Tumsifu, Saidi, and Mahamudu -- who remain dedicated to their studies and grateful for all the support!

Much gratitude to our supporters for continuing to invest in these students. The ripple effect here is undeniable! We even had two students (Diana and Sospeter) tell us that they want to sponsor a student in our program as a way of saying thank you for the support they received.  

To ensure we can continue to have an impact and reach even more amitious young people, consider donating today to Educate Children in Western Tanzania! (Click 'Give Now' button below.) Share our updates and campaign with friends (sharing buttons below), consider hosting your own fundraiser, or launch a students for students initiative at a local school and see what they can do! 

Again, asante sana! 

Sincerely,
Rai Farrelly & Lucas Lameck
Co-Founders, Project Wezesha

Dibeit with classmates at their Field Placement
Dibeit with classmates at their Field Placement
Rai, Lucas, Madaga and the campers
Rai, Lucas, Madaga and the campers
Furaha_Future Nurse!
Furaha_Future Nurse!
Bubbles with Lucas and Hawa
Bubbles with Lucas and Hawa
Christmas Celebration with Campers at Gordon Beach
Christmas Celebration with Campers at Gordon Beach
Lucas and Madaga serving at the feast
Lucas and Madaga serving at the feast

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Mahamudu in the Lab
Mahamudu in the Lab

Dear Project Wezesha Supporters,

We have so much to be grateful for right now! When Lucas and I founded Project Wezesha in 2009 (our 10 year anniversary is coming up!), we never imagined that we would be watching so many students complete secondary school with our support, enter vocational training programs, start high school, enter professional degree programs, and even go to university! 

One of our young men, Albert has just completed high school and was admitted to a diploma program in accounting -- Diploma of Procurement and Logistics Management. He will be starting this two year program in the new year and will be studying at the Institute of Accountancy in Arusha, Tanzania. 

Our Project Wezesha and Girls Education International students began their Form Four exams on November 5th. This year, we have many students sitting for these national exams. The exam period will run for two weeks and we will have results in January 2019. 

After the first day of testing, Madaga and Lucas checked in with the students to see how they were feeling. They reported that they were happy and felt confident thanks to the support they have received from the Academic Study Camps that we offer every December and June. They encountered content on the exams that they had reviewed in the camps. If we are lucky, up to 10 girls will start high school next year!! Everyone -- students, teachers and families -- are inspired by the impact of these camps on our students' academic performances and personal growth! We look forward to celebrating their tremendous efforts very soon. 

Mahamudu continues his second year of studies. He shared his growing knowledge base for work as a pharmecist in the following What's App message. Again, perhaps you have to have "known them when" to really appreciate how cool it is that he is sending this message via an App on a SmartPhone using academic, scientific langauge in English! (See photos of Mahamudu)

In the pictures, I am performing a practical in the laboratory. We were many students in one course that deals with pharmaceutical science. In the laboratory we were trying to prepare various mixture and solutions of different ingredients. One prep was KAOLIN MIXTURE P.CX.(syn.mistura kaolin alkalina). This mixture is used as Absorbent in the symptomatic treatment of diarrhoea. Another one prepared was BENZOIC ACID SOLUTION P.CX. The ingredients used in this preparation was 1,benzoic acid....... 5.0g , propylene glycol........75.0ml   , purified water freshly boiled......to 100.0ml.   The benzoic acid was dissolved in propylene glycol then water is added in small quantities with constant stirring to produce the required volume. This solution is used as a preservative.

On December 14th, I will be heading to Tanzania to visit our students as well as to observe and teach classes in our December academic study camp. I'm looking forward to sharing news from the field! This year, two of our long-standing supporters will be accompanying me to see the impact of their annual donations up close and personal! You'll be hearing from all of us very soon! 

In the meantime, as our students continue to be successful, we need your support more than ever! With the holidays around the corner, consider talking about our work with friends and family -- Would they chip in for Giving Tuesday? (GivingTuesday is Nov. 27th; keep an eye on our Facebook page for promotions coming soon!)

You can also consider alternative ways of giving through the holidays. GlobalGiving makes it easy to make donations in honor of loved ones. Many of us simply *have* too much -- think of someone in your life who would be touched by a donation made in their name to support students striving toward their academic and life goals. 

Asante Sana!

With much gratitude, 
Raichle Farrelly

Mahamudu with Classmates
Mahamudu with Classmates
Albert -- Future Accountant
Albert -- Future Accountant
Tumsifu
Tumsifu
Study Camp Science Labs
Study Camp Science Labs
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Sospeter and the Lads - his Form 3 Classmates
Sospeter and the Lads - his Form 3 Classmates

Dear Project Wezesha Supporters, 

Today we're sharing an update about one of our young men - Sospeter. Currently, he is a Form Three student. Next year he will be a Form 4 student, on his way to high school if all goes well!

This post comes from the blog of our volunteer Kate who recently lived in Mgaranza Village for several months and taught at Amahoro Secondary School and in our Academic Study Camp. You can read Kate's entire blog, including more of the pictures that accompanied this post here.

------------------

Sospeter is the unassuming leader of the pack. When I search for a teacher to help me and can’t fine one, Sospeter is the student I call upon. He is dependable. He has an old soul, with sound judgement and a calm demeanor that make him easy to be around. He is highly regarded by his peers and deemed trustworthy by adults. As a result, has earned the nickname “the General.” Sospeter exhibits a unique balance of seriousness and kindness.

Sospeter and I at Golden Beach during a Project Wezesha outing. Smiling for pictures is an American norm, not a Tanzanian norm. Hence the difference in our expressions.

Lucas, Madaga, and I walk with Sospeter to his parents’ house. Despite being a student, and only a teenager, Sospeter does not live with his parents. He visits them once a week. We walk the dirt roads to the far end of the village, up and down the rolling hills.

The conversation fluctuates between English and Swahili. Sospeter carries himself differently than his peers. While walking between Lucas and Madaga, it is evident that he is eager to become a man among men. And yet, in his desire to become a peer to his mentors, it is obvious to me that he is hungry for their guidance and positive influence. 

We arrive at his parents’ house. Sospeter’s warm introductions to his parents and siblings are sweet. He has three sisters and one brother. Despite the close knit ties among family and friends in the village, I have observed very few signs of affection from a Western perspective.

Sospeter’s interactions with his family are different. He greets his mother warmly and stands with pride as he introduces us to his father.I sit on a short stool, with Madaga and Lucas on similar chairs nearby. Sospeter is to my left, and his family sits on a mat on the ground to his left. It is a typical home visit. We discuss Sospeter’s academic progress, and the family expresses their gratitude for Project Wezesha. Without the non-profits’ support, Sospeter would not be in school as the family could not afford it.

I deviate from the scripted interview questions to ask Sospeter if he could have any book, what would it be. He answers quickly, as though he prepared for this exact question. “Physics.” I smile, knowing that my own sister is a physics teacher. My smile quickly fades. It is unlikely that Sospeter will ever own a book, nevertheless one about physics. Despite this reality, Sospeter holds on this his dream to become either a doctor or an engineer in order to help other villagers.

A textbook like this would cost around 20,000 Tanzanian shillings. ($8.75 USD)

After the conversation, I ask to look around the family’s property. I have never been to this part of the village before and the views are spectacular. Across the valley, we can see the ridgeline of larger mountains. I am told it is the boundary of Gombe Stream National Park.

Sospeter is eager to show us around. He explains that when he was in primary school, he was part of a Roots & Shoots project through the Jane Goodall Institute. One part of the project was planting trees around his house. It is with care and pride that he shows us these trees. No longer saplings, they have taken root. They provide shade, prevent erosion, and contribute to the thriving environment by hosting other living things.

The proximity to Gombe inspires Lucas to ask Sospeter a challenging question. “If a chimpanzee came to your land and destroyed your crops, what would you do to the chimpanzee?”

Both Lucas and Sospeter lack the English vocabulary to define the topics they are discussing. Yet, they do not need to know the terminology in order to address the intersectionality of wildlife management and conservation in conflict with private landowners who depend on the land for their livelihood.

It is a similar to the conversations and disagreements about wolves between ranchers and conservationists in Wyoming. Ranchers state that wolves kill their livestock and therefore their livelihood. Allies of the large canine state that wolves are a critical part of the ecosystem and need to be protected.

Sospeter acknowledges the difficulty of this conflict, but states his conclusion to the hypothetical question. He would let the chimpanzees go. They were here first and they too need the land to survive. Perhaps Roots & Shoots can be credited for helping Sospeter become a steward of the natural world. I see so much potential in this young man.

Sospeter is a dedicated student. And yet, his dedication is challenged. Due to the fact that his parents live far away from Amahoro Secondary School, Sospeter needs to live elsewhere. Many other students find themselves in this same predicament. The common solution is to rent a room from a villager who lives closer to the school. This solution is not available to Sospeter. Instead, he lives with his grandfather.

Living with a family member, closer to school seems like an ideal solution to me when I first hear of the arrangement. Then the details are shared with me. Sospeter’s grandfather is elderly. As a result, Sospeter must do all of the housework.

This is also true for all of the students who rent rooms. They all fetch their own water, do their own laundry in the stream, and cook their own food on an open fire. They wash their own dishes and clean their own dirt floors. The difference in Sospeter’s situation is that in addition to caring for himself, Sospeter is also charged with the responsibility of caring for his aging grandfather. To make matters worse, his grandfather is an alcoholic.

I am told that on many occasions Sospeter has had to clean up after his grandfather’s alcoholic binges. Sospeter does not complain when he reports this. Instead, he states it as a matter of fact, without the slightest hint of judgement of his grandfather or resentment of the situation.

I rack my brain for other solutions. I converse with my colleagues to discuss other possible living arrangements. I arrive at the same conclusion as Sospeter, Lucas, Madaga, and Sospeter’s family: without additional resources, there are no other options. This is the best case scenario for him.

This hurts my heart. Sospeter has all of the necessary traits to be successful. He routinely demonstrates a growth mindset. His intrinsic motivation leads him to study hours on end. He is responsible and mature, loyal and trustworthy.

And yet…. he was born into a family, through no fault of their own, are poor farmers in east Africa.

That is not the family I was born into. And I am riddled with guilt over my undeserved, unearned privilege.

Months after returning to the States, I continue to wrestle with this guilt. What is my role? What is my moral responsibility? How can I use my privilege to help others? How can I bare witness to the students’ lives that intersected with mine and do justice by them?

For now, all I can think to do is to share their stories. To advocate on their behalf. To strive to bring the humanity out in others and hope to inspire others to contribute to the greater good of the world.

If you feel so inspired, learn their names. Visit their homes. Sit with their families. Contribute to their future: Educate Children in Western Tanzania*. Hear their stories.

---------------

Project Wezesha would like to extend immense gratitude to Kate for all she has done and continues to do for this community of education-loving, inspired and inspiring young people! Stories are important and knowing these students individually -- really knowing their dreams, their accomplishments, their challenges -- is critical for a deeper understanding of your impact when you contribute to Project Wezesha and Girls Ed.

Thank you to you - our donors for all of your support. Please consider sharing this report with friends via email, Facebook, or Twitter ... handy sharing buttons below! If you'd like to get involved through your own fundraising efforts -- please be in touch and we'd love to discuss ideas! No contribution is too small -- remember, a Physics text for Sospeter is only $9.00

Sincerely,

Rai Farrelly & Lucas Lameck
Co-Founders
Project Wezesha

Sospeter Smiles
Sospeter Smiles
Students at Amahoro Secondary School
Students at Amahoro Secondary School
Lucas and Madaga - Educators, Role Models, Mentors
Lucas and Madaga - Educators, Role Models, Mentors

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Edasta
Edasta

Dear Project Wezesha Supporters,

We're happy to share an update about two of our students - Edasto and Nasra. They will be both be attending high school in the coming year! And ... this is so important to announce to the rooftops: These are our first female students to attend high school!!

Introducing Edasta

The Tanzanian government will select which high school she will attend.  It could be in any region, and she doesn't know if it will be a day school or boarding school.  Either way, she is excited about the opportunity. 

When asked why Edasta wants to go to high school, she answered, "because it makes my heart happy."  

Edasta wants to study Swahili, History, and English with the goal of becoming a translator.  Her desire to become a translator comes from the happiness she feels when she sees foreigners in Tanzania. 

 Until school starts, Edasta is teaching at a nursery school.  The paid position will help her as she transitions to being high school student. 

Edasta's advice for students who want to advance their studies is to answer questions with details.  Her advice for her three younger sisters is "study hard to be like me." 

Indeed she is a fantastic role model for her younger siblings, as well as other Project Wezesha students.

Congratulations, Edasta.   We are proud of you and wish you well!

------------------------

Introducing Nasra (pictured in pink)

Nasra successfully completed Form 4 and will be attending a boarding school in Uganda for high school.  Although she is sad that she will only see her family once a year while in high school, she believes the sacrifice will be worth it. 

Nasra understands that education can break the cycle of poverty.  Her advice to others is, "Study hard because life is so bad." 

Nasra may be done with secondary school but she is not done studying.  She plans to study various subjects before high school starts. 

In high school, Nasra will focus on Swahili, History, and English because those are subject she hopes to teach after finishing school. 

Her parting advice is, "Be honest about everything in order to make sure this world is a good place for living things." 

Project Wezesha Female Success Stories

Our Form 4 girls tried really hard to excel during study camp, which helped them perform well on their national examinations. However, several of them still didn't qualify to continue on to high school.

They will, however, be moving on to vocational training school for a range of courses including nursing and toursim. Stay tuned for udpates on those students!!

In the meantime, do consider making a contribute to help us cover the high school fees for Edasta and Nasra who will begin the next phase of their academic journey in July! 

Thank you for your continued support! Our journey continues, and we're happy you're still with us. Do share with friends and family about why this cause matters to you. Our girls are so grateful. 

Remember -- Mother's Day is right around the corner. Maybe a donation in mom's honor would be a nice way to show more than one special woman you care. 

Wishing you a lovely Spring into Summer! 

Cheers,

Rai Farrelly

Nasra
Nasra
Nasra and Edasta
Nasra and Edasta
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Organization Information

Girls Education International

Location: Boulder, CO - USA
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @girlsed
Project Leader:
Rai Farrelly
Co-Founder, Project Wezesha; Executive Director, Girls Education International
Boulder, CO United States
$40,196 raised of $75,000 goal
 
392 donations
$34,804 to go
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