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Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia

by Palomacy Pigeon & Dove Adoptions
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Foster volunteer Rachel & rescued pigeon Bloom
Foster volunteer Rachel & rescued pigeon Bloom

Bloom wants you to know how grateful she is that you saved her!

Today pigeon child Bloom is two months old, safe, sassy, happy and loved in a wonderful foster home. She is healing and growing and looking forward to a wonderful long life as a cherished companion. The pink dye she was marked with is starting to fade and her blinded-by-dye eye isn't so painful. She is a death-defying miracle bird. Thanks to you. Your support of Palomacy enabled us to rescue her when nobody else would.

Bloom is a King pigeon who was bred for meat (squab) and "harvested" from her family's nest at 28 days old. Unlike most who are routed straight to the processing plant to be butchered, shrink-wrapped and shipped to fancy restaurants, she was one of the birds trucked to a poultry market in San Francisco where, after being splashed with pink dye for batching (which blinded her right eye), she was sold live, to be home butchered.

Luck was somehow with this frail pigeon child again though because instead of being bought for dinner, she was bought for "release", a well-intended but misguided gesture that left her stranded on the edge of a park at 20th & Vermont in the Potrero Hill district of San Francisco. King pigeons are domestic and have no survival skills at any age but to be all alone and helpless is especially terrifying and dangerous for an immature, frail four week old domestic pigeon.

Amazingly, little Bloom defied death again when, before being killed by a predator (hawks, gulls, ravens, cats, raccoons, rats, etc.) somebody recognized her plight and brought her to the San Francisco Animal Care shelter where she was surrendered on Thursday, September 4th. 

Shelter staff contacted Palomacy the next morning asking if we would rescue the thin, weak, injured little bird. She was in bad shape, 911. We are always full up, always stretched to the max with 150 adoptable birds in 30 different foster homes and aviaries and a waiting list, but even so, we always try and thanks to two very special volunteers, Jerri and Rachel going above and beyond, and with our donors' generous support, Bloom once again defied death. We saved Bloom!

Jerri, one of our volunteer transport angels, dropped everything to make the 140 mile traffic-choked roundtrip to go pick Bloom up and rush her out to Medical Center for Birds in Oakley where they very kindly managed to fit her in to their already booked solid schedule. With supportive care, pain meds and antibiotics, she quickly began feeling better, started eating and was feeling feisty by Tuesday when she was discharged and Jerri once again made a long trip to pick her up and deliver her to foster volunteer Rachel who, despite all she's juggling, agreed to take little Bloom into her foster care.

Bloom has come so far and despite her blind right eye and a lingering sinus infection she is still be treated for, she is strong and looking forward to a happy future! She'll soon be meeting a pigeon-loving family that is interested in fostering to adopt and chances are they, like everyone else who has met her, will fall hopelessly in love with her exuberant spirit.

Bloom wants you to know that she is glad to be safe, to be protected and loved. To be alive!

Thank you for helping us to rescue Bloom and all the others. We can't do this without you.

Weak, emaciated, sick, injured Bloom 911 at SFACC
Weak, emaciated, sick, injured Bloom 911 at SFACC
Dr. Baden squeezed little Bloom in to her day
Dr. Baden squeezed little Bloom in to her day
Bloom feeling so much better thanks to vet care!
Bloom feeling so much better thanks to vet care!
Transport volunteer hero Jerri fell in love too
Transport volunteer hero Jerri fell in love too
Palomacy fosters, volunteers & donors saved Bloom!
Palomacy fosters, volunteers & donors saved Bloom!

Links:

Creating a new generation of caring
Creating a new generation of caring

Every day Palomacy helps so many people to help so many birds! So much goes on that it's hard to truly convey even just one day's worth of what our coo-munity is up to but I'm going to try. Here is just some of the Palomacy that happened on Tuesday, July 9th, 2019.

In partnership with the Palo Alto Humane Society's humane education program, Palomacy introduced 40 elementary school children and their teachers to the joys of pigeon rescue. Big brave King pigeon Dooby, gentle pigeon racing survivor Kensey and the show-stealingly personable feral pigeon Pip wowed everybody, kids and adults alike, with their charm and adorableness. We made 40 new friends for the pigeons, ambassadors who now know that pigeons are highly intelligent, deeply emotional, completely harmless and worthy of compassion!

Palomacy consulted over the phone with a family in Florida who had rescued a weak, lost pigeon racing survivor who wasn't eating. All are doing well now, Sunflower the lucky-to-alive pigeon as well as her people. Katie posted, "Love to this group and Elizabeth. Yesterday's rescue is now named Sunflower. She is in a roomy cage in our living room, eating, drinking, pooping and watching our whole household with intent interest! Last night I was not even sure she would make it through the night."

In just the one day, thanks to ten hard-working volunteer moderators, our Palomacy Help Group on Facebook accepted 25 new members, responded to 94 posts and 3,247 group members viewed, interacted or commented on our expert pigeon and dove rescue content! Additionally, there were 1,677 page views of Palomacy's website www.PigeonRescue.org by 1,338 unique visitors! And, through our partnership with AdoptAPet.com, Palomacy's adoptable birds are viewed 1,817 times in an average day! We received $118 in donations from six generous supporters.

And there's more! On Tuesday, one hundred and forty nine Palomacy foster pigeons and doves were lovingly, individually cared for at 26 different volunteer-provided homes and aviaries stretching from Sacramento to Sunnyvale, San Francisco to Sunol. Among them, special-needs Sizzle was driven 50 miles (one way) by his foster volunteer Chava from Fairfield to Medical Center for Birds where he was hospitalized to continue removing the painful ingrown feather cysts that, thanks to his fancy breeding, have created so many problems for his feet and eight year old King pigeon Gypsy, having laid two soft-shelled eggs, was driven by her foster volunteer Ari 54 miles (one way from San Francisco) to Medical Center for Birds. (Both are expected to do well.) Plus Chance, the brand-newly hatched feral pigeon baby rescued by a Good Samaritan from a busy San Francisco sidewalk and now fostered by pigeons Fizz & Beck, got the VIP expert care that only pigeon parents can provide.

We had a great meeting with new adopter-to-be Courtney who fell instantly in love with soulful Kensey and will begin fostering-to-adopt on Friday. We counseled several Bay Area Good Samaritans on the birds they are rescuing privately (we're still overfull) and answered adopters' questions. We worried and strategized about how to save wait-listed pigeons and doves who are in local shelters facing a dangerously uncertain future. 

We are doing so much and there is so much more that needs doing! The world needs all the Palomacy it can get. Thank you for helping to power this truly unique effort. Please help us as much as you can! We depend on you every day.

 

Pigeon-racing survivor Sunflower is safe & home!
Pigeon-racing survivor Sunflower is safe & home!
Palomacy helps so many birds & people every day!
Palomacy helps so many birds & people every day!
Orphaned baby Chance happy with foster mom Fizz
Orphaned baby Chance happy with foster mom Fizz
Adopter-to-be Courtney falling in love with Kensey
Adopter-to-be Courtney falling in love with Kensey
Fearless foster pigeon Gypsy went to see the vet
Fearless foster pigeon Gypsy went to see the vet

Links:

Ben & Lacy brought Sizzle to Palomacy for care
Ben & Lacy brought Sizzle to Palomacy for care

His little body told a sad story. He was brought into the shelter and surrendered by his owner on 4/20/19. No name, sex unknown, feathers thrashed, crawling with parasites, not-yet-diagnosed arthritis in both legs and with an untreated broken right ankle that had, over time, fused into an unuse-able infected, painful liability. He couldn't walk but could scoot and fly a short distance.

At the shelter, the busted up Indian Fantail was named Sizzle and put up for adoption with a promise of medical treatment required. A volunteer gave him a mirror for company and to try and determine his sex. (Pigeons love mirrors, are proven to self-recognize in them and males usually can't resist cooing at and showing off for their reflection. Females are most likely to just sit companionably close to their reflection.) Sizzle showed no response to the mirror at all suggesting he was either female, feeling poorly or both.

On 5/5, the volunteer, Lacy, reached out to Palomacy seeking help for Sizzle. She was worried about his prospects. When we heard about him, we were worried too. With his medical problems, Sizzle was more likely to get euthanized than adopted despite his wonderful pet potential. Special needs pigeons make lovely, charming and inspiring companions. They are very adaptable and can live long, happy, love-filled lives given the chance. We have seen special needs pigeons of all sorts- blind, crippled, paralyzed, neurologically impaired- thrive inspite of their challenges. There is a saying, "Pigeons bloom where planted" and it is true. Plus Palomacy has a motto: We don't have to start with euthanasia.

Lacy writes, "When we first saw Sizzle, we knew he was very special. The shelter kept him warm and fed him, and as amicable as their efforts were, they did not understand his needs or know how to properly care for him. We reached out to Palomacy who accepted him with open arms and a promise to care for him the way he deserves and to treat him for his needs." 

On 5/8, Lacy and her fiance arranged for Sizzle to be released to them as a Palomacy rescue and then made the 200 mile round trip to deliver him to me. The minute he arrived and heard the other pigeons, he perked up and started cooing, declaring himself to be all man bird. He had been depressed at the shelter. Being around other pigeons is a great tonic for a depressed pigeon. I gave him a bath and after some time basking dry in the sun, settled him into his VIP cage in my special needs bird room. On 5/10, I took him to Medical Center for Birds to see Dr. Gianopolous who admitted him for radiographs and wound care. There, we learned just how bad Sizzle's broken but untreated ankle was. We could also see evidence of an old injury to his vertebrae as well as an unidentified mass that could be either kidney or testicle-related. Sizzle's not had the easiest life so far but we are going to give him his best life going forward, for as long as he has.

I picked him up on 5/13 and brought him back to foster with me while we figure out the right long-term placement for him. Sizzle is great company and a very good patient, easy to medicate twice daily. He'd do best indoors as a pampered family pet or in a small aviary with a mate or gentle flock. Please let us know if you think you might be the person Sizzle is looking for. 

And of course, dear Sizzle's story is just one of many. Just since 5/5, we've also taken two juvenile King pigeons, Handsome and Beautiful and two doves, Fran and Ziti, into our care; we are coordinating the rescue of another not-yet-named stray dove; placed single female pigeon Flapjack in a forever home with rescued and no-longer-lonesome mate Super Lucy; rescued Iggy the stray Fantail; rescued, around-the-clock cared for and are mourning the deaths of two grieviously injured and terribly missed little pigeons, Patience and Ember; provided daily care for 140 fostered birds and advised on how to rescue and help almost 100 other pigeons and doves in need all over the country and beyond. And if we had more resources, we could be doing more.

There is a huge need for Palomacy! There are so many more people who are breeding, using and endangering these birds for their hobbies, sports and businesses than there are resources to help the inevitably lost and injured. We rescuers are vastly outnumbered and we need all the support you can offer. Thank you for donating to Palomacy! Thank you for volunteering and adopting and sharing and for all you are doing in your own world to help these sweet birds. You are making a difference!

With heartfelt gratitude,

Elizabeth

Sizzle shows off his big wings post-bath
Sizzle shows off his big wings post-bath
Dr. G meets, exams & falls in love with Sizzle
Dr. G meets, exams & falls in love with Sizzle
Sizzle
Sizzle's untreated broken ankle- fused-bone salad
Sizzle
Sizzle's infected pressure sore cleaned & bandaged
Sizzle thanks you for helping Palomacy help him
Sizzle thanks you for helping Palomacy help him

Links:

Saved!
Saved!

Your support saved these birds lives.

On November 28th, Palomacy received word that 28 domestic Ringneck doves (all descended from five) needed rescue as their person, a resident of the All Star Trailer Park, could no longer care for them. They were all living outside, crowded into unsafe cages so it was 911. 

The thing is, Palomacy foster homes and aviaries are always full up. The number of birds needing rescue is never-ending and our rescue is small. We don't have a sanctuary or a shelter facility though we very much need one. With every available foster space filled with the 130 birds already in our care, we didn't have any place to house a flock of 28 additional birds. The one shelter in the area that accepts birds was maxed out with a recent intake of 20 ducks. 

We networked and scrambled to try and find safe places for the doves to land. We got a couple of leads for potential aviaries and our current dove fosters looked to see how they could squeeze in a few more.

On December 2nd, super volunteer Jill (an all star in her own right) loaded up her car with carriers and made the 100 mile (one way) trip to go get the doves. We didn't know where they were going to go, only that they had to be rescued. While she was making the drive, dove foster volunteers Liese, Faye and Emma were preparing to fit a couple in here and there and I was working on the aviary leads. 

We never know what we'll find when we head out on a rescue. The All Star doves were living in terrible, unsafe and overcrowded conditions. And all except for one little splay-legged dovenow named Jade, were in perfect shape. Strong, healthy birds, They are what we call a "survival of the fittest" flock. Birds that were injured, ill or weak died while the strong survived. Some had gotten out now and then and been caught and killed but miraculously the cats, raccoons, raptors and rats hadn't yet killed them all in their their flimsy cages. 

Jill was welcomed and helped by Genevieve, the kind neighbor who had been feeding the All Star doves and who reached out to find help for them. They worked carefully to catch and transfer each dove from the cages to carriers, under the curious watch of the cat locals. And then another miracle. One of our aviary leads became a real possibility! Robin, referred to us by a local wildlife rescuer, had a vacant aviary, was home and willing to quickly complete our screening process! By the time Jill had all the doves loaded up, I had a wonderful potential fosterer for her to go meet!

I have no idea what we would have done if not for Robin's big, wonderful aviary and her immediate willingness to help us help these doves. She and husband Dean welcomed Jill and the All Stars. Together they reviewed Palomacy's foster policies and assessed the aviary for safety enhancements the doves would need. A couple hours later, 16 incredibly lucky doves, who had never been outside of small cages, we're stretching their wings and exploring their great big new foster aviary while their 12 friends rode along with Jill heading to the Bay Area to be fostered at her home in Sunol and in our Andy's aviary in San Jose!

In the two and a half months since this rescue began, volunteers helped to catch, band, photograph, name and enter all 28 into our adoptable birds database so that they appear on all the pet search sites. So far, nine of the All Stars- Piper, Pumpkin, Bossman, Georgia, Beau, Jasper, Ruby, Willow and Jade- have found their forever home with amazing adopter Angela! We still have 17 beautiful All Star doves eager to be adopted (in addition to the 20 doves we were already fostering) and though we no longer have the use of (traveling) Robin's aviary, we're making do with another smaller aviary (also heroically wrangled by Jill!) and a lot of creative dove tetris. 

We are though, as you can imagine, still even fuller than overfull and so in urgent need of adopters (for both doves and pigeons) in the Northern California area and we know of lots of adoptable birds all over the country so we can help you to help birds wherever you might be. Learn more here.

Please help us to continue this life-saving, rescue gap-closing work! Adopt a lovely bird or two or ten! Foster, volunteer, donate. Share this story and your love for birds. They need our help and we need yours. Thank You!

This is how the All Star doves had been living
This is how the All Star doves had been living
Palomacy hero Jill to the rescue!
Palomacy hero Jill to the rescue!
Robin & Dean
Robin & Dean's emergency aviary fostered 16!
Jill
Jill's splay-legged dove Rory & new dove Jade
These are just a few of the volunteers involved
These are just a few of the volunteers involved

Links:

Jonah Pidge safe & healing
Jonah Pidge safe & healing

While Palomacy hatched as a local effort to help pigeons and doves in the San Francisco Bay Area, the need for what we do is unlimited. As perhaps the only organization in the world completely dedicated to rescuing and rehoming the lost, injured and/or displaced pigeon and dove survivors of exploitive businesses, hobbies and sports, we help birds from all over. Here's the story of how Palomacy helped a pigeon in Chicago, written by his rescuer Chava Sonnier.

Jonah's Story

I am truly in awe of the incredible service and resources Palomacy provides not only in person but also across the miles and across the globe! I have been involved in bird rescue and rehab for many years, and noticed a need within our area for rehab focused on pigeons, and thus have been trying to learn as much as possible about these remarkable birds. You can imagine my joy and relief when a friend added me to the Palomacy rescue Facebook group, where I discovered a wealth of knowledge in a truly caring environment focused on the most important priority, namely, the well being of birds and all living creatures.

I reached out to Palomacy’s Facebook community on behalf of Jonah Pidge because he appeared to have lost the use of both legs. Jonah Pidge was brought to my husband and I late on a Saturday night severely emaciated, crusted with grit and other such city dirt, and so weak that he was laying on his side and couldn’t hold his head up on his own. He had extensive cuts and scrapes along both legs and his underside, which later made sense when we realized he likely had been attempting to drag himself around on the rough city surfaces.

We focused first on simply stabilizing Jonah Pidge, and after a few days of care (tube feeding, antibiotics, baths, cleaning and dressing the wounds) he regained his strength at a remarkable rate and had begun eating on his own, but both legs remained limp and unresponsive. A trip to the avian vet confirmed that he was most likely suffering neurological trauma along with the additional challenge of two old, badly healed and fused fractures in his left leg that caused his left leg to stick out at nearly a right angle from his body.

The wonderful members of Palomacy’s Facebook group provided a remarkable outpouring of advice, ideas, encouragement, and brainstorming as we strove to help Jonah Pidge heal. Our newfound Palomacy friends directed us to the helpful examples of similar cases on Palomacy’s website, messaged late night ideas for Jonah’s physical therapy, and even mailed custom garments to help keep Jonah Pidge spotlessly clean and healthy while he was unable to move himself.

Thus we ventured hopefully down the road of several weeks of Jonah Pidge resting in a towel doughnut to keep pressure off of his legs and underside, and twice daily hydrotherapy in the hopes he might regain mobility. Because he was a wild/feral city pigeon before his injury I worried the change to home life would be too hard for him, but pigeons never cease to amaze me with their adaptive poise… Such joy the first day Jonah Pidge felt both strong enough and at home enough in his “nest” to give me a solid Wing Fu slap! Even more amazing was when he started to respond to being gently held and petted with contented coos! I wanted to make sure he had as much mental stimulation and enrichment as possible despite his lack of mobility, and fortunately I work from home so Jonah Pidge and I soon fell into a habit of my either carrying him around the house wherever I went or rolling him with me from room to room as he rode regally in his towel doughnut on a rolling desk chair!

While my husband and I have had the honor of meeting dozens of pigeons thus far in our rehab journey, after a time they either passed away (birds need hospice care too!) or fortunately more often recovered and were able to be released (in the case of wild pigeons only) or adopted (in the case of domestic pigeons or non-releasable injured wild pigeons). At some point during the course of Jonah’s care we realized he would always be a special needs Pidge, certainly unable to fend for himself properly back in the wild, and thus the first permanent pigeon member of our family had found us. It is truly an honor and privilege to be his human “flock” and watch him flourish, regain weight, regrow his missing feathers, and confidently hop on my hand or into my lap for snuggles. (Jonah Pidge does wear pigeon pants sometimes since he is never caged and has the full run of our pigeon-proofed home, but he gets plenty of pants-free time too.)

I am beyond thrilled to be able to report he’s gained full mobility in both of his legs! His left leg will likely always have some limitations, but the avian vet concluded it doesn’t seem to cause him pain and thus advised against the risks of surgery, so we are continuing to work on his physical therapy and strengthening, and with classic pigeon poise he has adapted remarkably well to a life of fluffy blankets and stuffed animals, snuggles, and having full reign over the house. I am so grateful to Palomacy for offering such helpful insights into Jonah’s care across the miles, and to Jonah Pidge for brightening our lives tremendously!

 

Palomacy depends on your support to do the life-saving, culture-changing work we do every day of the year!

Chava, healed Jonah Pidge & Zach at COO-CHELLA
Chava, healed Jonah Pidge & Zach at COO-CHELLA
Palomacy
Palomacy's 2019 Full Color Photo Wall Calendar
The Palomacy-recommended pigeon stroller is here!
The Palomacy-recommended pigeon stroller is here!
Thank you for all that you do & give to support us
Thank you for all that you do & give to support us
 

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Organization Information

Palomacy Pigeon & Dove Adoptions

Location: San Francisco, CA - USA
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @PigeonDiplomacy
Project Leader:
Elizabeth Young
San Francisco, California United States
$205,620 raised of $250,000 goal
 
3,761 donations
$44,380 to go
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