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Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia

by Palomacy Pigeon & Dove Adoptions
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Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Beatrice, pigeon-racing survivor
Beatrice, pigeon-racing survivor

Beatrice

In early June, a domestic pigeon, bred for "sport", was taken far from home and released (along with thousands of others) to try and race back. Instead she was injured and grounded. She was incredibly lucky to be found by a kind person before being killed by a hungry predator. She was taken to a shelter that doesn't really serve birds (few do) and while they waited to hear back from her owner (they didn't), she also waited... They didn't understand how compromised she was and she didn't get a lot of care. 

When I picked her up on June 30th to bring her into Palomacy's foster care, I was shocked to find her so emaciated and weak. She was completely unable to use her legs and down on her keel (breastbone). Usually shelters alert us to the 911 cases and we prioritize those birds, bumping them up ahead of the less-urgently-in-need birds on our waiting list, but that hadn't happened for Beatrice. I was very worried that help might have come too late for her.

Though very quiet and gentle, Beatrice has a strong will and she was not ready to give up. She had suffered spinal trauma and while she couldn't move her legs, they still had feeling. With enough time and support, we've seen a lot of pigeons make amazing recoveries and Beatrice is one of them. It took a few weeks of supportive care, pain and anti-inflammation meds, cage rest and hydrotherapy (floating in my kitchen sink an hour a day to relieve pain and pressure and improve circulation) and very gradually, Beatrice regained weight, strength and the use of her legs! She can now stand, walk and fly. On October 1st, she attended her first outreach and adoption event and though I still treat her like she's glass, she's strong and did great. Beatrice has made her remarkable recovery because Palomacy was able to give her the opportunity to heal. Beatrice is one of more than 800 pigeons and doves whose lives we have directly saved since we began this work in 2007. And, thanks to the power of the Internet, we are helping countless others through coaching, education and referrals. You are helping Palomacy save a lot of lives. Thank you!

Flocktoberfest!

We will be celebrating our 10 years of life-saving, culture-changing, pigeon and dove-rescuing Palomacy with a party on Saturday October 21st in Burlingame, CA- Flocktoberfest and you are invited! (Can't be there in person? Order your Flocktoberfest shirt or mug here.)

Bonus Match Happening Now

We need your help to do this work and today, right now, from 6 AM to 9 PM PT, is the last GlobalGiving Bonus Match of the year. There is $50K in bonus match funds available and the percentage we receive will be determined by the portion of donations Palomacy earns so every donation, large and small, early and late, helps! Please make a donation if you can. Thank you!

..

On intake- emaciated, weak, unable to use her legs
On intake- emaciated, weak, unable to use her legs
Beatrice was a model patient, floating peacefully
Beatrice was a model patient, floating peacefully
Beatrice in September- healed!
Beatrice in September- healed!
Come celebrate 10 years of Palomacy with us!
Come celebrate 10 years of Palomacy with us!

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Liberty with Shae
Liberty with Shae

Today, right now, is one of our biggest fundraising opportunities of the year. Donations made now to Palomacy through GlobalGiving will earn a much needed bonus match of +50%, while funds last. Your help makes the life & death difference for birds like Liberty. Thank you!

On a clear morning in May, Elizabeth sent an email to a group of Palomacy volunteers in the North Bay: A woman had unexpectedly passed away leaving a flock of doves with no one to care for them. Palomacy was too full to bring them into foster care, so could somebody please help the family transport the doves to the Marin Humane Society?

My afternoon was open so I raised my hand to help out. When I arrived at the woman’s home, I met two concerned cousins, each doing everything they could to handle a sad and challenging situation, including making a responsible plan for the nine ringneck doves who had been, in the words of one cousin, the woman’s whole life up to the time of her death.

The doves seemed healthy and well-cared for but I was shocked to discover that one of them was blind! Before heading out that day, I had asked Elizabeth if I should let her know about any special needs and she said no— that I should secure them and transport them and alert MHS to anything unusual.

“We just can’t rescue them all,” she said.

I understood this. Palomacy is full and already caring for a great number of pigeons and doves with special needs, and resources are limited. To keep this work going and to help more birds like these sweet doves, the organization needs more adopters, fosterers, volunteers, and donors. Knowing this, I took a deep breath and reinforced my determination to simply do what I was asked: Pack up the birds and get them safely to the shelter.

I loaded nine doves (in six carriers!) and one cousin into my Subaru wagon, the little blind dove riding in a cage on the cousin’s lap. This dove— no one knew her name or the names of any of the other doves but one, an aggressive male named “Muffin”— was missing one eye and blind in the other and she had a big bald spot on top of her head. My guess was that she had been injured early in her life in a fight with another member of the flock and then housed by herself, with the woman as her primary companion. She was very quiet on the ride, gathered completely into herself and moving very little.

The truth is, at first I could hardly look at her for fear of heartbreak. I knew almost nothing about her previous life but it was enough to understand that she had just lost her world and that she wasn’t likely to survive at the shelter. It was highly unlikely that a maimed, blind bird would be deemed adoptable. I imagined she might be euthanized before the day was done and I was trying to avoid becoming attached. (Not very successfully, as it turned out!)

At MHS, we placed all the birds in their carriers and cages in a holding room. On my way out the door, when I thought I was turning my back on the blind dove forever, I heard an insistent coo. Muffin, the alpha male, was getting all worked up in his cage. None of the other doves responded to his outburst except the blind one: She suddenly stood up straight and let out a series of enthusiastic coos and a “laugh” that I wouldn’t have thought she had in her. Then she started to preen. Tears sprang to my eyes.

I sent Elizabeth a text and a photo:

“Oh, Elizabeth, all these doves look great except this old sweetie who is blind and nearly immobile – but still laughing and preening. Hard to leave her here (hard to leave ANY of them here) but is there any other choice?”

Elizabeth never got that text, nor did I get a message saying it failed to go through. While I thought I was waiting to hear back from her, we went ahead with the surrender paperwork at the front counter. I had to keep looking away from the desk because I didn’t want the kind cousin to see me crying. I was trying to get it together. She had just lost a family member and was working so hard to help. I was supposed to be the strong one here!

Finally, I sent another text to Elizabeth. In this one, I sound resigned, but really I wasn’t at all:

“Okay, they’re all checked in . . . the little old blind one will be assessed and hopefully deemed adoptable. I’m all teary.”

Then came the text I expected:

“I didn’t know one was old & blind! We’ll take that one. Can you reach out to MHS & let them know ASAP?”

I flew into action:

“I’ll bring her home and we can figure out where she’ll go from there. Honestly, I didn’t think you’d want me to leave an old single blind bird here.”

Said Elizabeth:

“You were right. Sometimes the only thing we can do is help one more.”

That’s why Palomacy is so special! And that’s how Palomacy and I met the dove I soon named Liberty — or Libby for short.

When I brought Liberty home, I had four pigeons of my own in outdoor aviaries, plus I was bird-sitting a charming indoor ringneck dove named Lucky (also adopted from Palomacy). I have a fair amount of experience with these coo-birds, but being with a blind bird was brand new to me. For guidance, I turned to Elizabeth (of course!) but also to the mysterious, tiny being beside me. She might not be able to see or use human-speak, but I knew she could tell me a lot about herself and what she needed.

Knowing she was used to a woman’s voice, I talked to her in soothing tones. I hoped that hearing my voice would help her relax and begin to get oriented. Indeed, her hearing was very sensitive and she quickly clued into wherever I was in the room. When I was nearby, I would be sure to speak to her and let her know what I was doing: “Hi Libby, it’s just me, sweetie. I’m going to open your cage door now, okay?”

When I reached my hand into her cage to gently stroke her neck, I was amazed by her response. She leaned into my hand as soon as she sensed it, perking up and clicking her wings. Again, it became obvious that there was a lot more life in this little girl than I could see with my two good eyes. I could feel that she wanted to step right up onto my hand. Lifting her up while protecting her with my other hand, I drew her close to my chest. From there, all she wanted to do was snuggle or, at other times, walk up the front of me and nestle into my neck or hunker down on my shoulder. (I would let her do the shoulder balance only with something behind us, like the back of the couch, to avoid unpleasant surprises. I had no idea if she could fly; for her safety I had to assume that she could fall.)

When Libby felt social and safe, she would begin to coo — and then she would coo and coo and coo and coo. I said to Elizabeth, watch out, this bird will knock the love socks right off you. She is absolutely irresistible and I wished I could have kept her with me forever. Right now, she’s soaking up the wonderful foster care of sisters Paloma and Vivia and their mom, Dale. They didn’t have her long before they fully understood why I cried (again!) when I left her with them. Everyone falls hard in love with Libby!

Libby was also great at letting me know when she did and didn’t want to be held. Sometimes she was clearly excited to be picked up and sometimes she ignored my hand when I offered it to her, letting me know she preferred to rest. But I know she always listened to me when I came in and out of the room and that she truly seemed to like and rely on the sound of my voice. After she was gone, I missed her so much that for a little while I kept right on talking to her.

Hey, Libby, I hope you’re doing well at your new foster home. I know they’re going to love you and take good care of you.

Hi, Sweet Liberty, thank you for letting me get to know you.

Okay, Libby, I’m going out now, I won’t forget about you!

Please, help support the life-saving, culture-changing work Palomacy is doing & donate here now to earn a 50% bonus match while funds last. Thank you! 

 

Our first photo of Liberty
Our first photo of Liberty
Libby's blind but otherwise uninjured eye
Libby's blind but otherwise uninjured eye
Vivia and Liberty meeting for the first time
Vivia and Liberty meeting for the first time
Liberty and Shae
Liberty and Shae
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Compassion is beautiful!
Compassion is beautiful!
Congratulations to Sochi the self-rescuing King pigeon and his rescuer and photographer Patti Delaney! This beautiful photo, taken while Sochi was making a very special new friend at an outreach event earlier this year, has made it into GlobalGiving's 2017 Photo Contest as a semi-finalist! Please support us with your vote and help us compete for $1000 prize and lots of extra publicity! Contest voting ends this Friday, May 26th at 9 AM PT. One vote per person and email verification is required.
 
Sochi's Story by Patti Delaney
On February 18, 2014, I arrived home from work to find my husband sitting on the planter box in the front yard talking to a pigeon. He said it wouldn’t leave. I suspected something was wrong with it, injured or sick. I threw my sweater over it and put it in a cat carrier. I sent a picture to Elizabeth Young at Palomacy, asking “What do I have?” "Domestic, unreleasable King pigeon, bred for meat, squab." she said.
 
I brought him to see her at the next outreach and confirmed he bird was a big, male King pigeon in great shape considering he had been out alone and unprotected.
 
The Winter Olympics were on and the landscape of the Olympics in Sochi resembled the coloring of this pigeon—he was named Sochi.
 
Sochi stayed indoors in a cat condo until a used aviary could be assembled and refurbished. We paired him up with another rescued King pigeon we thought was female, Pearl, but who turned out to be male too. This paring was not a good match. Eventually two rescued female domestic pigeons were introduced to Sochi and Pearl. The aviary was too small for all four pigeons. Sochi and his chosen girl, Amica, stayed; Pearl and Xena left to be fostered.
 
Last July, another self-rescuing domstic pigeon, dyed, starving and near death, landed on a relative’s window sill. After nursing her back to life and when she was strong enough, she was placed in a cage within the aviary. We named her Jo Jo. Jo Jo loved Sochi, but Amica refused to share Sochi. This was not a good situation.
 
Our solution was to build a big, beautiful 8’ x 10’ aviary. With the help of Palomacy, we found a mate for Jo Jo and brought back Pearl and Xena to be adopted. They are all home. There is no bullying from Sochi. In fact, he is a healthy, happy pigeon with his mate Amica and all his flock mates. (Turns out it is easier to care for a flock of pigeons than just a couple!) Periodically he goes to outreach events. He does a great job and thoroughly enjoys the attention.
 
Don't forget to vote for Sochi and please share with your friends too!
 
Patti Delaney is a long-time bird lover. In 1992, she met and purchased a 5-year old Umbrella Cockatoo, Lacy. Wanting to learn more about bird care, she became a member of the Capitol City Bird Society. In the Sacramento community, she was a paid guest speaker with Lacy. When Lacy died unexpectedly in 2009, she found and adopted an Umbrella Cockatoo, Georgi, from the bird rescue, Mickaboo. This is when she met Elizabeth Young with Palomacy (previously MickaCoo) and became knowledgeable and passionate about stopping the exploitation of domestic pigeons and doves.
Palomacy is pigeon diplomacy.
Palomacy is pigeon diplomacy.
Amica & Sochi
Amica & Sochi
The life-saving aviary Sochi inspired
The life-saving aviary Sochi inspired
Sochi, Patti, Xena & Pearl have a chat
Sochi, Patti, Xena & Pearl have a chat

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Rescued pigeons Alfred & Bert (dyed pink) & Patch
Rescued pigeons Alfred & Bert (dyed pink) & Patch

One million domestic King pigeons are bred annually in California for meat (squab). A few wind up in rescue rather than as the dinner on a fancy plate they were intended to be. With your support, Palomacy helps these and other lucky survivors get adopted rather than euthanized. With your help, we are closing a deadly gap in the animal welfare community. Every one of these birds is an individual. Here's the story of three: Patch, Alfred and Bert.

Instead of being butchered when they were four weeks old, Patch, Alfred and Bert were purchased live from a poultry market. We don't know how many were "released" (either in a misguided effort to liberate them or for ceremonial use) but we do know how many were rescued- three. 

The Good Samaritan who found the three baby pigeons huddled together in a park on June 20th, 2016, knew they were out of place and so he gathered them up and brought them to the San Francisco SPCA. Though they don't usually take in birds, their Humane Education team, already fostering four of Palomacy's pigeons in the Summer Camp program, made an exception for them.

All of our foster homes and aviaries were full up (we always are with usually 120+ pigeons and doves in our care plus a waiting list) and so the extra help from the Humane Ed team was critical. I went to check on the pigeon youngsters that afternoon and they were sick. While adult pigeons are hardy, the youngsters, their immune systems undeveloped and exposed to so much stress through the "harvesting", transport and sales/"release" process, are frail. We got them settled in and started on antibiotics. They had eluded the butcher and survived an inhumane "release". They were very lucky to be alive.

Everyone fell in love with the strikingly marked black and white pigeon kids. And, as if they weren't eye-catching enough, Alfred and Bert's feathers were stained with pink food coloring- something that the poultry sellers do to mark batches of birds. Unfortunately, despite all the loving care of the SF SPCA team and the best efforts of our avian vets at Medical Center for Birds, Patch, the sickest of the trio, passed away on July 11th. Necropsy revealed the extent of his infection which affected multiple organs as well as the lack of immune response.

Time went on and Alfred and Bert grew to maturity. The four adult pigeons fostered in the aviary with them, Rose and José and Hannah and Oakley, had been tolerant of them as youngsters but as puberty set in, tensions arose within the flock. Bert who had been a confident and bossy bird (despite his crossed beak) began to get bullied and to decline. He lost weight, needed to be separated from the flock and required repeated vet visits to treat multiple issues. Maggie, Manager of the Humane Education Department and all of her team, went so above and beyond helping to not only care for and transport Bert (many miles) but also contributing very generously towards his mounting vet expenses. Eventually, I took Bert into my foster care for additional medical support and Alfred went to try out living with a pair of Palomacy supporters, Aria and Julie, who had gone to the trouble and expense of moving out of their apartment and into another just so they could adopt a pet pigeon.

For Alfred and Aria and Julie, it was love right from the start! Alfred is home, adopted. She (yes, she we now know) really blossomed in their care and Alfred is one of the happiest, most beautiful pigeons ever! She loves her people and all the ways they dote on her including giving her free range of their apartment, minced veggies and fresh greens, on-demand sink showers, a special cozy after-bath lounge, coconut oil foot rubs, all the charger cords she can steal for nest-building, etc. etc. and she returns their love with all her sweetness and the deep affection that only pigeons can give. She even has her own awesome Instagram account and now she has a mate too- a very lucky and charming unreleasable Rock pigeon named Pirate has joined the family!

Bert is still fostered with me, still getting eye drops every day in order to defeat the persistent pseudamonis sinus infection once and for all. He is gaining weight and feeling really good these days. He is a very handsome and loveable bird, no longer pink but forever with his crossed beak. I've been told by more than a few people that he is their favorite. He's a great ambassador for the pigeon tribe and lots of fun to take to outreach events. Bert has come a long very way from the squab plant where he was bred to be meat. Now Bert's ready to romance and marry a lady pigeon, to be adopted, to go home. Who's ready for Bert?

SF SPCA Humane Educators cared for Bert & friends
SF SPCA Humane Educators cared for Bert & friends
Dr. Murphy taking care of Patch
Dr. Murphy taking care of Patch
Maggie and Bert working from home together
Maggie and Bert working from home together
Aria and Julie and Alfred are all madly in love
Aria and Julie and Alfred are all madly in love
Bert is doing great now, ready for a mate & a home
Bert is doing great now, ready for a mate & a home

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Miu is safe & happy now (Photo by Cynthia Zhou)
Miu is safe & happy now (Photo by Cynthia Zhou)

We are here, able to help birds in need of rescue, because of you.

Miu was one of more than 40 birds displaced when their person, a San Jose resident, died in November. There were 20 finches, 10 budgies, lovebirds, rosellas, doves and two pigeons. (He had bred and sold birds for many years. In the past, he had hundreds.) The deceased’s family reached out to Mickaboo Companion Bird Rescue (the parrot rescue with whom we partnered for our first four years as MickaCoo Pigeon & Dove Rescue) to take the birds out of his backyard aviaries and into their rescue (except for the two pigeons which they just let out of the aviary). One of the pigeons was promptly attacked by their dog. The other eventually went back into an empty aviary. Michelle Yesney, Mickaboo CEO and one of many Mickaboo volunteers who worked on this big rescue, closed her in to keep her safe and contacted us.

We are beyond full… stretched to the breaking point caring for 130 birds in 27 volunteer foster homes/aviaries (and coaching, referring, counseling on behalf of many more) but every day, we have to figure out how to help the birds that no one else will. And so we stretched some more. I reached out to Faye, the volunteer who coordinates our foster Lobby Pigeons team at the Humane Society of Silicon Valley in Milpitas, who could transport and to Clare, our Leadership Team Chair who could short-term foster, to put together a rescue team for this pigeon in need.

As soon as Faye arrived on the property and spoke to Michelle, the lonesome pigeon, from a aviary far down an empty row of structures and out of sight, began cooing, calling for help.

Faye took her home overnight while she waited to go to Clare’s the following day. It was a big improvement in her situation! The little homing pigeon (the kind bred and used for "dove releases") was very tame and immediately set about making friends with Faye. She loved being petted and spoken to. When Faye would leave the room, the little pigeon would coo and coo to call her back. (See a short video.) Pigeons will vocalize to communicate with people just as they would call to one another. She was saying, Come here. Be with me. Stay with me. This is the behavior of a very tame, bi-cultural (pigeon/human) bird. 

The next day, the little Homer was transferred to Clare’s house for foster care. She took to wearing pigeon pants with ease. And just as she had quickly won Faye’s heart, she won Clare’s too.

In the meantime, I had posted about the little lonesome Homer on our Facebook page as part of the effort to find her a long-term foster or forever home… 

And Cynthia, a bird lover and Palomacy supporter who’s been thinking about a pet pigeon for a long time, saw her photos and was moved to complete our application. We talked through the requirements and what goes into caring for a pet pigeon and Cynthia set about getting ready. She suggested the name Miu which means “beautiful feather” and “kind-hearted” and so Miu she is. The following week, on November 27th, Cynthia went to Cupertino to pick up Miu. And they have been having a love fest ever since.

Last night I asked Cynthia for the Miu Report and she wrote,

The Miu Report is looking bright! She seems to have settled in very quickly and already claimed a few favorite spots around the room. The doves have left her alone, although they once flew over to a table near her food and I saw her give a warning peck in their general direction. She’s done this less with me, but she often flies over to Mako to land on his head or back, and it’s the cutest thing. We’ve had several friends meet her, and they all adore her. She’s something of a minor celebrity at the moment, and several people have asked to visit us so they can meet her. It’s finals week for us, so we’ve been spending a lot of time at home but we’re usually focused on studying, and she’ll sometimes walk over our keyboards to get our attention. We would love to adopt her, because fostering is going well (and Mako and I are very attached – we consider her part of the family already). She’s made herself right at home and our daily routine involves so much time with her that it’s hard to believe she came into our lives less than a month ago. I hope she gets to stay for a long, long time.

And so, with the help of a whole team of dedicated volunteers and supporters, Miu has been saved. She is safe, loved. She is home. Thank you for helping rescues like Palomacy (and Mickaboo) to help birds like Miu.

We couldn’t do this without you! 

Waiting to be rescued
Waiting to be rescued
Lonesome rescued pigeon happy to be getting love
Lonesome rescued pigeon happy to be getting love
Miu meeting her new person Cynthia
Miu meeting her new person Cynthia
Mako, Cynthia & Miu
Mako, Cynthia & Miu

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Organization Information

Palomacy Pigeon & Dove Adoptions

Location: San Francisco, CA - USA
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @PigeonDiplomacy
Project Leader:
Elizabeth Young
San Francisco, California United States
$245,710 raised of $300,000 goal
 
4,380 donations
$54,290 to go
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