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Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia

by Palomacy Pigeon & Dove Adoptions
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Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Save Domestic Pigeons and Doves From Euthanasia
Palomacy was baby Glory's only hope
Palomacy was baby Glory's only hope

In just the past month, we've taken in four pigeons requiring extensive avian veterinary care, expensive even after our generous rescue discounts. Are we crazy? It feels crazy when we don't have the funds to say yes nor the option to say no.

Doc

Doc is a very tough and lucky King pigeon. She survived the squab business and then endured the hardships of an inhumane release. On May 29th, emaciated with a broken wing, broken & crushed foot, a head wound, trichamoniasis, roundworms & chlamydia, she self-rescued by parking herself on the steps of the SF Police Department's Department Operation Center (DOC). Her new friends, knowing she would be euthanized if taken to the shelter, reached out to Palomacy for help and, even though we're already over capacity, I picked her up that same day. Because what else could we do? They named her Doc. Since then, she's been hospitalized and discharged twice and is still on meds. The crushed foot cost her circulation and she's losing three of the four toes on that foot but we're hopeful she'll have a good sturdy partial foot left with which to walk. She's a beautiful, brave bird- alive and safe.

 

Glory

On June 4th, a nice person, Jennie, found a tiny, big-eyed, splayed-leg & curled-foot feral nestling pigeon sitting stranded on a busy Oakland sidewalk. She couldn't leave her there so brought her home and began searching for help. WildCare lovingly rehabs and releases hundreds of feral pigeons every year but, for her, unable to stand or walk, euthanasia would be the outcome more likely than release. And though she'd make a wonderful pet, Jennie couldn't keep her. So, when she found her way to Palomacy, over full as we were, I knew that we were her only hope. Unlike most pigeon kids who are so disarmingly trusting, she was wild and suspicious of us. Defiant. I named her Glory. Her strong spirit has served her well. Dr. Speer was impressed with her tough attitude and with the full 120 degree rotation of her leg that, even so, folded with joints lined up perfectly, ideal for corrective surgery. The derotational osteotomy meant her leg would be surgically broken, rotated into proper alignment with a stainless steel pin inserted into the bone shaft lengthwise to provide stability while healing. Her newly arranged feet would be taped to a snowboard-style fixator to position both legs correctly. It's not an easy recovery and we needed little Glory's trust and cooperation to make it work. So I took her back home with me for a week to try and win her over. It worked! Her surgery and recovery have gone well. Her legs are still wonky but, with the help of a hobble, she can now stand, walk and fly. Glory is thriving, loving and happy with a bright future ahead of her. 

 

Winter

Beautiful Fantail-lite pigeon Winter was rescued from a creek (and beside an egret!) five years ago by hikers who saw his predicament. His new family loved him, built him a beautiful aviary and adopted a mate for him and another when he was widowed. Unfortunately, cicumstances conspired against him and, due to family and financial issues, he needed both a new home and extensive surgery to remove several bunches of tumors from all around his jaw, from above his eyes and from both wings. We didn't have the funds to cover the costs but we also didn't have any other options. Without Palomacy, he'd be euthanized and Winter is too full of joy, life and love. He is nowhere near ready to give up. So we can't either. Our avian vets at Medical Center for Birds do everything they can to cut costs for us while still taking incredible care of our rescued birds. Since being surrendered to our care on June 11th, he's had two surgeries. The first removed the large tumors clustered like grapes all around the underside of his face and beak. Removing those made him more comfortable while also giving us tissue for the lab tests. It came back as cancerous- sarcoma. He handled the surgery and recovery so well, is so full of hope and high spirits, that I said, Yes, to the second surgery* to remove the other tumors above his eyes and on his wings. (*It was too much to safely do all in one surgery.) Winter is doing great and flirting madly with his fellow bird room patient Doc. Seeing him strut and prance and coo and woo, it is only too clear that if saving his life is crazy, then we don't want to be sane.

 

Marshamallow

On Friday June 29th, a kind family was trying to rescue a pair of abandoned cats when they happened on a helpless pigeon, a 4 month old pigeon racing survivor emaciated and helpless with a broken wing and a badly broken leg that may require surgery and pinning if it is to heal functionally. They took her to Lindsay Wildlife Rescue  but since they don't serve pigeons, they were referred to Palomacy. The family called and, since they couldn't care for her and we didn't have any alternatives to suggest, I said yes to helping her. They named her Marshmallow and transported her straight to the vets where she is currently hospitalized. Marshmallow is a sweet, gentle pigeon child who wants to live. Is that crazy?

 

"Sanity is a madness put to good uses." George Santayana

 

Thank you for helping us to save the lives of these incredible birds. 

Doc & Dr. Speer of Medical Center for Birds
Doc & Dr. Speer of Medical Center for Birds
Glory- unable to stand or walk due to splayed leg
Glory- unable to stand or walk due to splayed leg
Winter's cancerous tumors had to be removed
Winter's cancerous tumors had to be removed
Winter is full of life, joy & love. He thanks you!
Winter is full of life, joy & love. He thanks you!
Volunteer Krista & tall Glory, up on her feeties!
Volunteer Krista & tall Glory, up on her feeties!
Marshmallow has a chance now he's getting help
Marshmallow has a chance now he's getting help

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Flip & Borealis keeping company at the vet's
Flip & Borealis keeping company at the vet's

Did you know that Palomacy rescues not only domestic pigeons and doves but unreleasable ferals too?

When Emerald found a broken-winged feral Rock pigeon, she brought her home to her small boat, named her Borealis and began searching for rescue help. But Borealis' wing was badly damaged and with the likelihood of ever being able to fly again nearly nil, the chance of releasability was very low and euthanasia was the best even pigeon-friendly wildlife rescues could offer. But Borealis wanted to live and Emerald was determined to save her. Luckily, Emerald found Palomacy and, thanks to your support, we were able to say Yes to saving Borealis' life. The injuries to her elbow and shoulder joints mean the wing is irrepairable and Borealis won't fly again but pigeons are brilliantly adaptable and she is very happy now fostered in our Special Needs aviary, keeping company with Jacob and Athena, Freddy and Penny, Bearice and Waffle and making friends with a new pigeon named Flip. 

Flip is a little feral Rock pigeon with a special feather updo who at some point survived stringfoot entanglement but lost one foot and a toe to the injuries. When found on a stormy spring morning in Washington Square Park, Flip was soaked to the skin, skinny, weak, grounded and wearing a homemade prosthetic glued to his stump, a sort of badge of kindness that someone made for him. Flip was taken to San Francisco Animal Care & Control but he was feeling lousy. Flip wasn't eating and they contacted Palomacy for help. And again, thanks to your support, we were able to say Yes to saving Flip. With a little TLC and surrounded by lots of inspiring pigeons, Flip is regaining his strength, putting on weight and making new friends. His prosthetic fell off and he's managing well on his own little peg leg. The other day, Flip and Borealis shared a carrier on their trip to our avian vet partners- Medical Center for Birds, and they got along great all day. It's too soon to say but they may be heading towards a romance.

What is certain is that these two brave little birds have a safe and happy future now, thanks to you! 

Thank You for supportng Palomacy! You are making a life-saving, compassion-creating difference.

Emerald saved broken-wing Borealis
Emerald saved broken-wing Borealis
Borealis healing up
Borealis healing up
Flip at the animal shelter
Flip at the animal shelter
Borealis & Flip chillin' in the Specials' aviary
Borealis & Flip chillin' in the Specials' aviary
Borealis & Flip are happy & thankful to be alive
Borealis & Flip are happy & thankful to be alive

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Pirate & Alfred, married & adopted
Pirate & Alfred, married & adopted

Dear Palomacy Supporters,

Thank you for being essential members of our small but powerful Palomacy team! Together we are saving the lives of pigeons and doves who would otherwise be killed. Your support for our groundbreaking work turns donations into rescue missions, bird healing, aviary building, humane education and adoptions! Together we are closing a deadly gap in the animal welfare community.

We saved the lives of 248 birds in 2017 and we helped many more, from all over the country and beyond, through our Facebook Help Group, online educational resources and 365-days-a-year coaching and referral network. Palomacy is the go-to resource for people who find the injured, lost, weak survivors of pigeon “sports”, “dove releases”, grounded feral pigeons... birds like Alfred & Pirate.

Alfred
At the tender age of only four weeks, baby King pigeon Alfred was “harvested” from her parents’ nest and trucked to a live poultry market in San Francisco where she was sold as meat (squab). Instead of being butchered when she was purchased, she was inhumanely “released” in a park in a misguided effort to save her. She sat there, still and scared. Domestic pigeons, though unable to survive in the wild, are highly intelligent. She knew she was in trouble, instinctively fearing the ravens, hawks, gulls and cats that prey on vulnerable birds. Alfred’s life was saved when she was taken to a shelter that serves birds through its partnership with Palomacy.

Pirate
Around this same time, fifty miles south in San Jose, a fledgling feral pigeon, also about four weeks old, was found injured and helpless. He had survived a predator attack but lost an eye and was grounded by head trauma. A Good Samaritan took him to a pigeon-friendly wildlife rescue hoping he could be saved. He had a big personality and they named him Pirate. His injuries made him unreleasable though and he needed a forever home or he’d be euthanized. He needed Palomacy’s help and so the staff reached out to us to save him.

Alfred and Pirate, after several months in Palomacy’s foster care, have both found their way home. Alfred was adopted first, instantly becoming the beloved bird child of Aria and Julie. They were head over heels for her before I even left their apartment that first night. She’s a pampered pigeon with all the best birdy accoutrements and her own Instagram account. And, when she was ready for a mate, we arranged a pHarmony date with the dashing bachelor Pirate. They had instant chemistry and soon their flirtation became courtship, then marriage, and then Aria and Julie adopted Pirate too. Home.

Palomacy relies on one employee (me) and nearly 100 volunteers to respond to the thousands of calls, emails and messages we receive seeking help for birds in trouble. We do outreach events, provide humane education, maintain a much-referenced website and publish inspiring blog posts and newsletters that are read by thousands. Our home-based fosters and compassionate supporters enable us to provide exceptional care, every day of the year, to the hundreds of injured, sick, and/or displaced pigeons and doves that no one else will help. (We don’t have a sanctuary yet, though we hope to someday.)

Together, we are truly making a life-saving, culture-changing difference. Thank you! Happy New Year!

 

Alfred's adopters fell instantly in love with her
Alfred's adopters fell instantly in love with her
Pirate while he was still a bachelor foster bird
Pirate while he was still a bachelor foster bird
Aria & Julie- adopters, volunteers & donors
Aria & Julie- adopters, volunteers & donors
Art generously created for us by Meg Germundson
Art generously created for us by Meg Germundson

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Beatrice, pigeon-racing survivor
Beatrice, pigeon-racing survivor

Beatrice

In early June, a domestic pigeon, bred for "sport", was taken far from home and released (along with thousands of others) to try and race back. Instead she was injured and grounded. She was incredibly lucky to be found by a kind person before being killed by a hungry predator. She was taken to a shelter that doesn't really serve birds (few do) and while they waited to hear back from her owner (they didn't), she also waited... They didn't understand how compromised she was and she didn't get a lot of care. 

When I picked her up on June 30th to bring her into Palomacy's foster care, I was shocked to find her so emaciated and weak. She was completely unable to use her legs and down on her keel (breastbone). Usually shelters alert us to the 911 cases and we prioritize those birds, bumping them up ahead of the less-urgently-in-need birds on our waiting list, but that hadn't happened for Beatrice. I was very worried that help might have come too late for her.

Though very quiet and gentle, Beatrice has a strong will and she was not ready to give up. She had suffered spinal trauma and while she couldn't move her legs, they still had feeling. With enough time and support, we've seen a lot of pigeons make amazing recoveries and Beatrice is one of them. It took a few weeks of supportive care, pain and anti-inflammation meds, cage rest and hydrotherapy (floating in my kitchen sink an hour a day to relieve pain and pressure and improve circulation) and very gradually, Beatrice regained weight, strength and the use of her legs! She can now stand, walk and fly. On October 1st, she attended her first outreach and adoption event and though I still treat her like she's glass, she's strong and did great. Beatrice has made her remarkable recovery because Palomacy was able to give her the opportunity to heal. Beatrice is one of more than 800 pigeons and doves whose lives we have directly saved since we began this work in 2007. And, thanks to the power of the Internet, we are helping countless others through coaching, education and referrals. You are helping Palomacy save a lot of lives. Thank you!

Flocktoberfest!

We will be celebrating our 10 years of life-saving, culture-changing, pigeon and dove-rescuing Palomacy with a party on Saturday October 21st in Burlingame, CA- Flocktoberfest and you are invited! (Can't be there in person? Order your Flocktoberfest shirt or mug here.)

Bonus Match Happening Now

We need your help to do this work and today, right now, from 6 AM to 9 PM PT, is the last GlobalGiving Bonus Match of the year. There is $50K in bonus match funds available and the percentage we receive will be determined by the portion of donations Palomacy earns so every donation, large and small, early and late, helps! Please make a donation if you can. Thank you!

..

On intake- emaciated, weak, unable to use her legs
On intake- emaciated, weak, unable to use her legs
Beatrice was a model patient, floating peacefully
Beatrice was a model patient, floating peacefully
Beatrice in September- healed!
Beatrice in September- healed!
Come celebrate 10 years of Palomacy with us!
Come celebrate 10 years of Palomacy with us!

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Liberty with Shae
Liberty with Shae

Today, right now, is one of our biggest fundraising opportunities of the year. Donations made now to Palomacy through GlobalGiving will earn a much needed bonus match of +50%, while funds last. Your help makes the life & death difference for birds like Liberty. Thank you!

On a clear morning in May, Elizabeth sent an email to a group of Palomacy volunteers in the North Bay: A woman had unexpectedly passed away leaving a flock of doves with no one to care for them. Palomacy was too full to bring them into foster care, so could somebody please help the family transport the doves to the Marin Humane Society?

My afternoon was open so I raised my hand to help out. When I arrived at the woman’s home, I met two concerned cousins, each doing everything they could to handle a sad and challenging situation, including making a responsible plan for the nine ringneck doves who had been, in the words of one cousin, the woman’s whole life up to the time of her death.

The doves seemed healthy and well-cared for but I was shocked to discover that one of them was blind! Before heading out that day, I had asked Elizabeth if I should let her know about any special needs and she said no— that I should secure them and transport them and alert MHS to anything unusual.

“We just can’t rescue them all,” she said.

I understood this. Palomacy is full and already caring for a great number of pigeons and doves with special needs, and resources are limited. To keep this work going and to help more birds like these sweet doves, the organization needs more adopters, fosterers, volunteers, and donors. Knowing this, I took a deep breath and reinforced my determination to simply do what I was asked: Pack up the birds and get them safely to the shelter.

I loaded nine doves (in six carriers!) and one cousin into my Subaru wagon, the little blind dove riding in a cage on the cousin’s lap. This dove— no one knew her name or the names of any of the other doves but one, an aggressive male named “Muffin”— was missing one eye and blind in the other and she had a big bald spot on top of her head. My guess was that she had been injured early in her life in a fight with another member of the flock and then housed by herself, with the woman as her primary companion. She was very quiet on the ride, gathered completely into herself and moving very little.

The truth is, at first I could hardly look at her for fear of heartbreak. I knew almost nothing about her previous life but it was enough to understand that she had just lost her world and that she wasn’t likely to survive at the shelter. It was highly unlikely that a maimed, blind bird would be deemed adoptable. I imagined she might be euthanized before the day was done and I was trying to avoid becoming attached. (Not very successfully, as it turned out!)

At MHS, we placed all the birds in their carriers and cages in a holding room. On my way out the door, when I thought I was turning my back on the blind dove forever, I heard an insistent coo. Muffin, the alpha male, was getting all worked up in his cage. None of the other doves responded to his outburst except the blind one: She suddenly stood up straight and let out a series of enthusiastic coos and a “laugh” that I wouldn’t have thought she had in her. Then she started to preen. Tears sprang to my eyes.

I sent Elizabeth a text and a photo:

“Oh, Elizabeth, all these doves look great except this old sweetie who is blind and nearly immobile – but still laughing and preening. Hard to leave her here (hard to leave ANY of them here) but is there any other choice?”

Elizabeth never got that text, nor did I get a message saying it failed to go through. While I thought I was waiting to hear back from her, we went ahead with the surrender paperwork at the front counter. I had to keep looking away from the desk because I didn’t want the kind cousin to see me crying. I was trying to get it together. She had just lost a family member and was working so hard to help. I was supposed to be the strong one here!

Finally, I sent another text to Elizabeth. In this one, I sound resigned, but really I wasn’t at all:

“Okay, they’re all checked in . . . the little old blind one will be assessed and hopefully deemed adoptable. I’m all teary.”

Then came the text I expected:

“I didn’t know one was old & blind! We’ll take that one. Can you reach out to MHS & let them know ASAP?”

I flew into action:

“I’ll bring her home and we can figure out where she’ll go from there. Honestly, I didn’t think you’d want me to leave an old single blind bird here.”

Said Elizabeth:

“You were right. Sometimes the only thing we can do is help one more.”

That’s why Palomacy is so special! And that’s how Palomacy and I met the dove I soon named Liberty — or Libby for short.

When I brought Liberty home, I had four pigeons of my own in outdoor aviaries, plus I was bird-sitting a charming indoor ringneck dove named Lucky (also adopted from Palomacy). I have a fair amount of experience with these coo-birds, but being with a blind bird was brand new to me. For guidance, I turned to Elizabeth (of course!) but also to the mysterious, tiny being beside me. She might not be able to see or use human-speak, but I knew she could tell me a lot about herself and what she needed.

Knowing she was used to a woman’s voice, I talked to her in soothing tones. I hoped that hearing my voice would help her relax and begin to get oriented. Indeed, her hearing was very sensitive and she quickly clued into wherever I was in the room. When I was nearby, I would be sure to speak to her and let her know what I was doing: “Hi Libby, it’s just me, sweetie. I’m going to open your cage door now, okay?”

When I reached my hand into her cage to gently stroke her neck, I was amazed by her response. She leaned into my hand as soon as she sensed it, perking up and clicking her wings. Again, it became obvious that there was a lot more life in this little girl than I could see with my two good eyes. I could feel that she wanted to step right up onto my hand. Lifting her up while protecting her with my other hand, I drew her close to my chest. From there, all she wanted to do was snuggle or, at other times, walk up the front of me and nestle into my neck or hunker down on my shoulder. (I would let her do the shoulder balance only with something behind us, like the back of the couch, to avoid unpleasant surprises. I had no idea if she could fly; for her safety I had to assume that she could fall.)

When Libby felt social and safe, she would begin to coo — and then she would coo and coo and coo and coo. I said to Elizabeth, watch out, this bird will knock the love socks right off you. She is absolutely irresistible and I wished I could have kept her with me forever. Right now, she’s soaking up the wonderful foster care of sisters Paloma and Vivia and their mom, Dale. They didn’t have her long before they fully understood why I cried (again!) when I left her with them. Everyone falls hard in love with Libby!

Libby was also great at letting me know when she did and didn’t want to be held. Sometimes she was clearly excited to be picked up and sometimes she ignored my hand when I offered it to her, letting me know she preferred to rest. But I know she always listened to me when I came in and out of the room and that she truly seemed to like and rely on the sound of my voice. After she was gone, I missed her so much that for a little while I kept right on talking to her.

Hey, Libby, I hope you’re doing well at your new foster home. I know they’re going to love you and take good care of you.

Hi, Sweet Liberty, thank you for letting me get to know you.

Okay, Libby, I’m going out now, I won’t forget about you!

Please, help support the life-saving, culture-changing work Palomacy is doing & donate here now to earn a 50% bonus match while funds last. Thank you! 

 

Our first photo of Liberty
Our first photo of Liberty
Libby's blind but otherwise uninjured eye
Libby's blind but otherwise uninjured eye
Vivia and Liberty meeting for the first time
Vivia and Liberty meeting for the first time
Liberty and Shae
Liberty and Shae
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Organization Information

Palomacy Pigeon & Dove Adoptions

Location: San Francisco, CA - USA
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @PigeonDiplomacy
Project Leader:
Elizabeth Young
San Francisco, California United States
$230,545 raised of $300,000 goal
 
4,191 donations
$69,455 to go
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