Help Filipino Communities Prepare for Disaster

by International Disaster Volunteers (IDV)
Help Filipino Communities Prepare for Disaster
Help Filipino Communities Prepare for Disaster
Help Filipino Communities Prepare for Disaster
Help Filipino Communities Prepare for Disaster
Help Filipino Communities Prepare for Disaster
Help Filipino Communities Prepare for Disaster
Help Filipino Communities Prepare for Disaster
Help Filipino Communities Prepare for Disaster
Help Filipino Communities Prepare for Disaster
Help Filipino Communities Prepare for Disaster
Help Filipino Communities Prepare for Disaster
Help Filipino Communities Prepare for Disaster
Help Filipino Communities Prepare for Disaster
Help Filipino Communities Prepare for Disaster
Help Filipino Communities Prepare for Disaster
Help Filipino Communities Prepare for Disaster
The stage you funded in use during dance practice
The stage you funded in use during dance practice

Thanks to your incredible support the Banaba Livelihood and Evacuation Center, just outside Manila, has been a hive of community activity over the last few months.

In our last project report we explained how we’d just disbursed funds to support further improvements to the building; including tiling, bathroom maintenance and even the construction of a small stage.

Well, in this update we’re delighted to report that work in all these areas, and more, has progressed very well.

Tiling has been completed in the busiest areas of the ground floor, helping to protect the previously laid concrete and also making it much easier to clean. This will be especially important when the building is being used as an evacuation centre during typhoons.

To further help maintain the sanitary conditions your donations have also been used to make repairs to the bathrooms, such as the replacement of taps and fittings. This may seem pretty minor, but clean water is a precious resource, particularly during times of disaster, so it’s vital that none is lost through leaky joints and faucets.

And happily, because of similar prudence with your kind donations, our last disbursement went even further than originally planned. There was some money left over after our other work, and so we decided to purchase and install some electric ceiling fans to help keep the temperature more bearable during the hot Filipino weather. Again, this will work will benefit the community generally, but especially during evacuations.

Finally, and as also mentioned above, your donations have also now been used to build a stage within the building. Such stages are ceremonially important in the Philippines, and the community needed one to use during their regular “study visits” from local universities and partner NGOs.

The community’s youth group, who are especially busy over the summer holidays, also needed a stage for their music and dance sessions, so we were delighted to be able to help with the work.

As always it was great to see photos of the work in progress, but we were even more delighted to see the stage in full use during a recent public performance from the youth group. A few photos from this, and from the work in general, are included in this report.

None of this work would have been possible without your generous donations, and on behalf of the community of Banaba we want say a big THANK YOU for your amazing support.

We’ll be sure to keep you posted as our work on the centre continues, and if you ever have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Andy@IDVolunteers.org. I would be delighted to hear from you.

Practice makes perfect for the live performance
Practice makes perfect for the live performance
Tiles being laid to protect the busiest areas
Tiles being laid to protect the busiest areas
Replacing old taps helps preserve precious water
Replacing old taps helps preserve precious water
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Some of the local youth who use the centre
Some of the local youth who use the centre

Thanks to your amazing generosity our work to improve the Banaba Livelihood and Evacuation Center, just outside Manila, is making even more progress.

In our last project report we described how we’d just finished laying a final “screed coat” of concrete throughout the building’s three floors. This replaced the previously uneven and dusty surfaces with a smooth, easy to clean finish.

Yet, while this has already made a big impact we’ve recently decided to go even further and start tiling as well. This will make a big difference during evacuations, and will be important during the rest of the year as well.

Outside of typhoons and floods the building is a hub for a wide range of Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) and community development projects.

These projects include the manufacture of flood rescue boats, income generation activities and urban vegetable gardening to provide families with better nutrition and food security. A community youth group also holds workshops at the centre to help empower and engage the next generation as well.

These workshops happen year round, but right now schools are closed for the “summer” holiday and so it’s a particularly busy time.

For example, the president of our local partner group, a gentleman called Ka Noli, recently had this to say:

This month of April, when summer vacation commenced, we held music and dance mentoring/practices almost every other day. The children are being taught the reading of music notes, tempos and the different signs in a music book. The dancing includes some intros on ballet posture, stretching, and finally the whole step by step choreography of the song by Black Eyed Peas - Where Is The Love?”.

The building really is a community hub and a great example of local, grassroots action at its best. In fact, the work is so incredible that there’s a rarely a week that passes without visitors from other NGOs or universities coming by to learn during “study visits”.

Given all the footfall we’ve realised that tiling will be essential, at least in some areas, to help maintain the building and the projects it enables.

And we’re not stopping there either. While discussing the planned work Ka Noli also made another request on behalf of the community:

“The children are performing very often at the front area of the 2nd floor of the building. This is also where we hold study visits and explain the Community Risk Map and show videos and other material. Spectators would have a much better view if given an elevated area in front. So, we would like to build a 9m x 4m stage. Here's hoping we shall get your support on this proposal.”

Having worked in Manila, and also the city of Tacloban, for a number of years we know that this is an important request. Most community buildings, including schools, have some sort of stage for performances and formal ceremonies which are a big part of Filipino culture. So, we were delighted to approve this request.

Funds were disbursed a few days ago for both the tiling and the stage, and we’re also going to perform some general maintenance on some of the building's doors and windows too.

None of this vital work would be possible without your incredible donations, and on behalf of Ka Noli and the entire community of Banaba we want to thank you for your amazing support.

We’ll be sure to keep you posted as the work continues, and if you ever have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Andy@IDVolunteers.org. I would be delighted to hear from you.

A music and dance workshop
A music and dance workshop
Ka Noli explaining the community risk map
Ka Noli explaining the community risk map
The centre's urban vegetable garden
The centre's urban vegetable garden
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Tess sends you her thanks
Tess sends you her thanks

Thanks to your incredible support we’re continuing to help Filipino communities prepare for disaster.

Over the last few months our focus has returned to completing the Banaba Livelihood and Evacuation centre, just outside Manila.

The building’s original donor ran out of funds before construction was finished, and so for much of the last year we’ve been working hard to finish the job. This is to ensure that local residents have a place to shelter during typhoons, and also so that the building can be used for important community development projects at other times.

For example, in a project report last August we described how we’d been able to complete the external rendering on all but one of the buildings sides.

Well, we’re delighted to report that the final side of the building has now also been rendered as well. This rendering is important to protect the building’s walls from the torrential downpours which batter the building during the annual rainy season. And completion of this work marks yet another milestone which has only been possible to reach thanks to you!

But our most recent round of work didn’t stop there. With the external rendering now finally complete we’ve been able to turn our attention to the interior as well.

And the first internal job needing attention was the building’s three floors.

While the main concrete slabs were laid during the original construction process these were also left unfinished. The original plan was for the floors to be tiled, but with the original donor’s funding in short supply this job was sadly never done. As a result the building was left with uneven, dusty floors, which presented a trip hazard, and also meant that the centre was very hard to clean as well.

Given that proper sanitation is vital during evacuations, and also because the building is used by young and old alike at other times, we knew that this was an issue that needed resolving.

So, we also recently used your generous donations to lay a final “screed coat” of concrete throughout the building. And to add a touch of welcoming brightness, this screed coat was also coloured as well.

As a result the building’s interior has now been transformed and we asked some of it’s users to describe the impacts.

Firstly, Francia had this to say:

Our floors are now in good order and neat. The floors are easy to clean-up because there is less dust. The children who run around are now free from skids, and accidental falls due the uneven pavement of the floors before. The floors are neat to behold. Thank you!”

Tess, another of the local residents, had this to say:

The uneven surface of floors before gave us difficulties to clean, but now it’s much easier to clean the the new floors, because there are no more cement dusts sticking on them. The cleaning time for the floor is now much less, so we can devote additional work time to other tasks in the centre, like the garden, the chickens, and composting”.

Finally, Pablo also sent his thanks:

In the old days, our feet [were] enveloped with the white dust from the unpaved, unrendered floors. When walking around, dust gathered on the soles of our slippers, our feet, and up to our lower extremities. We experience itchiness from the cement. But now because I see everyday the rendered, smooth and colored surface, I always take the initiative to mop the floor - I like to see the floor in a neat condition especially when there are guests coming. Thank you for helping us”.

We want to reiterate the thanks from Francia, Tess and Pablo. And we also want to emphasise just how vital your generosity continues to be for this project. Some donors might be a little put off supporting a project started by someone else, perhaps because they don’t feel quite as much ownership over the end result.

But completing the centre is vital for both the safety and long-term development of the local community, and you’ve stepped up to help with this vital task. Thank you so much.

Moving forward there’s more work yet to be done on the interior, and the building also needs equipping with things like bunk beds too. So, we’ll keep fundraising right here on GlobalGiving, and we’ll also keep you posted as the work continues.

As always, if you ever have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Andy@IDVolunteers.org. I would be delighted to hear from you.

The final side of the building is now rendered
The final side of the building is now rendered
The floors also received a colourful screed coat
The floors also received a colourful screed coat
The floors are now bright and easy to clean
The floors are now bright and easy to clean
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Josephine is one of the hundreds helped by you
Josephine is one of the hundreds helped by you

Thanks so much for helping Filipino communities prepare for disaster.

For much of this year, and with your amazing support, we’ve been heavily focused on completing the Banaba Livelihood and Evacuation centre, just outside Manila.

However, while the building itself is vital to protect Banaba’s residents from typhoons and floods, the center is also the hub of a range of community based Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) initiatives that your donations also help support.

And, in the middle of August, dramatic events in Banaba once again showed why proactive DRR is so important in saving lives, and also in quickly providing relief when the worst inevitably happens.

On Saturday August 13 torrential monsoon rains caused extensive flooding across Manila’s low lying areas, Banaba included. Residents, fearful of the danger began evacuating to nearby schools, community centers, churches and other buildings strong enough to offer protection.

But floods strike quickly, especially when rivers suddenly burst their banks, and it’s not always possible for some people, particularly the very old or very young, to move quickly. When this happens, lives are under threat as people become trapped by the rising flood water.

This is exactly when flood rescue boats provided by IDV are so important. These boats are deployed before the water reaches dangerous heights, and so they’re immediately on hand to reach those in danger.

And August 13 was no different - several of our boats saw action during the floods, and over 180 people were rescued as a direct result.

These included eight month old Noelle. Noelle’s parents, Maricel and Noel, struggle to move their young children quickly during floods. So, it was up to our rescue boats to bring the family to safety.

Also rescued was 46 year old Josephine, and her two teenage children. Although Josephine was scared during the floods, she was confident they would survive thanks to the reassuring presence of our rescue boat. Josephine also had this to say:

“Thank you for providing us a rescue boat in our area - it surely helps in saving lives!”

We second Josephine’s thanks, and we also want to thank you for supporting our related work at the Livelihood and Evacuation Center. During our ongoing work to complete the building we also built a new boat workshop on it’s top floor. So, with your help, other vulnerable communities will also receive these life saving boats in the future.

But this isn’t the only way the center, and your donations to this project, helped to protect Banaba’s residents during the recent floods.

The center is also home to a “community kitchen”, and your donations are also used to stockpile food ahead of the monsoon season. This way, when disasters like those in August do strike, hot food can be quickly prepared and distributed to hungry evacuees.

In August for example your donations provided hot, nutritious chicken porridge to over 280 people after the floods. These meals helped keep Josephine and Noelle’s family fed after their rescue. This not only provided them with energy and comfort, but also a valuable financial lifeline.  

Both families houses were left full of silt after the floods, and neither Josephine or Noelle’s parents could work for three days while they cleaned up. The meals you provided meant that they didn’t have to buy food when cash was already in very short supply.

All of this vital DRR work, and much more, is based out of the Livelihood and Evacuation Center. So, thanks so much again for your support in completing the construction, and also for supporting the projects that are based there.

As always, if you ever have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Andy@IDVolunteers.org. I would be delighted to hear from you.

Our boats also rescued Noelle (in pink)
Our boats also rescued Noelle (in pink)
You helped us stockpile food before the floods
You helped us stockpile food before the floods
So we could quickly feed people during disaster
So we could quickly feed people during disaster
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
A new water pump being installed thanks to you
A new water pump being installed thanks to you

Thanks to your amazing generosity our work to improve the Banaba Livelihood and Evacuation Center, just outside of Manila, has made even more progress since our last report.

In that last report, we announced that the center had finally been made watertight, years after construction had first started. Sadly, the original donor ran out of funds before the building was finished, and this left hundreds of Banaba’s residents without a safe refuge during typhoons and floods.  

So, last December we stepped up to finish the job, and we reached the watertight milestone this April. But more remained to be done, and so we’ve continued this vital work over the last few months.

For example, several sides of the building were still unrendered, and this meant that brick walls - several of them newly built thanks to you - were left unprotected from the torrential rains that arrive every typhoon season.

This would have left the building vulnerable to damage, and with all our recent hard work, this was a situation we clearly wanted to avoid.

Happily, thanks to your further support, we were recently able to purchase enough sand and cement, and also hire a local tradesman, to complete rendering on two more side of the building. This is another fantastic result, thank you so much!

There’s now just one external side of the building left to render, and we’d hoped to finish this in the latest round of work. However, like any building the Evacuation Center also needs ongoing maintenance as well.

For example, while planning the recent rendering work we received this message from Ka Noli, the President of our local partner Buklod Tao:

Just recently i commented in my email message to you that the Center has not been fully finished and yet, maintenance requirements are [also] getting strenuous.

In May 2012, Buklod Tao was able to purchase a second hand 1 horse power water pump for around $200. It has provided water for the center for the past four years. And it conked out last Thursday, 19th May.

I am saddened this morning today with the diagnosis of Gerry, our expert plumber, and member of Buklod Tao Board of Trustees, relative to the status of the water pump. It is already beyond repair, and needs replacement.

So, no water for the entire center!

The water crunch is [already] being felt, and in June 2016 we are expecting sixty youth to spend time here. Having no water provision for the sixty guys would be a big, big headache for us.

We need an A-1 status water pump to last a longer time. May I appeal for the purchase [of a new pump] to be defrayed from the earmarked rendering amount?  

Having no water at an Evacuation Center, which is also used for general community projects, was obviously a problem that needed solving. So, although we were a little disappointed not to be able to finish the rendering, we didn’t hesitate to approve Ka Noli’s request.

And so, thanks to you, the building now also has a brand new, high quality pump to provide water in the years to come.

We still want to complete the remaining rendering of course, And once the building work is done, we’d still like to provide bunk beds and other facilities for the evacuees who will shelter inside the center.

So, we’ll keep fundraising here on GlobalGiving, and of course keep you updated along the way. Once last time, thank you so much for helping the Filipino community of Banaba to prepare for disaster.

As always, if you ever have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Andy@IDVolunteers.org. I would be delighted to hear from you.

For more updates about our work please like us on Facebook or follow IDVExec on Twitter. You can also email Andy is you would like to be added to our direct mailing list.

 

Materials arrive to continue rendering the walls
Materials arrive to continue rendering the walls
One side of the building before our latest work
One side of the building before our latest work
The same side after our latest work
The same side after our latest work
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
 

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating.

Get Reports via Email

We'll only email you new reports and updates about this project.

Organization Information

International Disaster Volunteers (IDV)

Location: Bristol, Somerset - United Kingdom
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @IDVMedia
Project Leader:
Andy Chaggar
Bristol, Somerset United Kingdom
$7,308 raised of $16,000 goal
 
147 donations
$8,692 to go
Donate Now
lock
Donating through GlobalGiving is safe, secure, and easy with many payment options to choose from. View other ways to donate

International Disaster Volunteers (IDV) has earned this recognition on GlobalGiving:

Help raise money!

Support this important cause by creating a personalized fundraising page.

Start a Fundraiser

Learn more about GlobalGiving

Teenage Science Students
Vetting +
Due Diligence

Snorkeler
Our
Impact

Woman Holding a Gift Card
Give
Gift Cards

Young Girl with a Bicycle
GlobalGiving
Guarantee

Sign up for the GlobalGiving Newsletter

WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.