Happy Chickens for Fiji Food & Climate Emergency!

by Corals for Conservation
Happy Chickens for Fiji Food & Climate Emergency!
Happy Chickens for Fiji Food & Climate Emergency!
Happy Chickens for Fiji Food & Climate Emergency!
Happy Chickens for Fiji Food & Climate Emergency!
Happy Chickens for Fiji Food & Climate Emergency!
Happy Chickens for Fiji Food & Climate Emergency!
Happy Chickens for Fiji Food & Climate Emergency!
Happy Chickens for Fiji Food & Climate Emergency!
Happy Chickens for Fiji Food & Climate Emergency!
Happy Chickens for Fiji Food & Climate Emergency!
Happy Chickens for Fiji Food & Climate Emergency!
Happy Chickens for Fiji Food & Climate Emergency!
Happy Chickens for Fiji Food & Climate Emergency!
Happy Chickens for Fiji Food & Climate Emergency!

Project Report | Feb 17, 2017
Vanuatu Trainees Trained in Fiji

By Austin Bowden-Kerby | Program Director

Joel and Iopil, our Vanuatu Trainees
Joel and Iopil, our Vanuatu Trainees

In December and January we hosted two trainees from Vanuatu at our Sustainable Livelihoods Farm in Fiji for six very full weeks.  This was our first Happy Chicken international training, and it was very productive.  The two men are Iopil, 36, from Tanna Island, and Joel, 54, from North Efate.  The men were chosen based on their past service to the community and an established focus on improving community livelihoods.  This was their first time ever out of their home country, and so the trip was very significant for them.  They learned so much and we had a wonderful time hosting the men. 

Joel and Iopil learned all aspects of Happy Chickens, from hatching and rearing, feed production and housing, to egg production and breeding.  Now that the trainees are back in Vanuatu, the strategy is for them to train others in their communities and to establish breeding flocks, as well as assisting with the establishment of small-scale hatcheries on each of their two islands.  Follow up is occurring through a local Vanuatu-registered NGO, HCD- Human Capacity Development, which includes getting the required biosecurity the permts to allow us send our improved chicks to Vanuatu, as well as identifying the best local chicken stock for crossbreeding.

The good news is that we have succeeded in getting a grant from Palladium Australia, which will fund materials and incubators to support these new efforts.  In this way, a small project is now growing into permanent, meaningful, and lasting change.  Neither Joel nor Iopil have electricity in their villages, and so they will focus entirely on establishing breeding flocks and producing high quality fertile eggs, while the incubators will be located in the town areas, where electricity is dependible, and operated by others who are being trained and involved in the project.  The fertile eggs will be delivered weekly from the breedng farms to the hatcheries, with the newborn chicks then carried back to the villages and raised for three weeks by Joel and Iopil before they are distributed to the trained community members.  The goal is to over time create a sustainable enterprise that makes a small profit for the families involved, so that the breeding farms and hatcheries can continue on their own with little outside support, within two years if possible. 

We should also say here that the two hatcheries will be established in addition to encouraging natural hatching under broody hens. Hatching under hens is normally sufficient for local farmers to maintain their flocks, once the flocks are well established, but with occasional reinforcement with hatchery chicks, to increase genetic diversity and adequate numbers.  However, it will be many years before the communities become saturated with chickens to the level required for maximizing resources, understanding that the chickens make use of worms and bugs and leaves and waste food, and thus take unusable resources and convert them into usable protein.

Once these two islands, Tanna and Efate, have sustainable breeding farms and hatcheries, we are looking to expand to the islands of Santo and Malekula in 2018.

Thanks again to our donors, who help ensure that we are on our way and making progress day by day, month by month. This work makes such a big difference to the people, to the children, and to the future.

 

 

 

   

Joel and Iopil, Happy Chicken Trainees
Joel and Iopil, Happy Chicken Trainees
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Nov 23, 2016
A New Breed of Chickens and Exciting Developments

By Austin Bowden-Kerby | Project Leader

Aug 30, 2016
450 Happy Chickens Sent to Disaster Hit Islands

By Austin Bowden-Kerby | Project Director

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Organization Information

Corals for Conservation

Location: Samabula - Fiji
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Project Leader:
Austin Bowden-Kerby
Samabula , Fiji
$44,711 raised of $75,000 goal
 
449 donations
$30,289 to go
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