Support for flooding victims in Western Japan

by Second Harvest Japan
Support for flooding victims in Western Japan
Support for flooding victims in Western Japan
Support for flooding victims in Western Japan
Support for flooding victims in Western Japan
Support for flooding victims in Western Japan
Support for flooding victims in Western Japan
Support for flooding victims in Western Japan
Support for flooding victims in Western Japan
Support for flooding victims in Western Japan
Support for flooding victims in Western Japan
Support for flooding victims in Western Japan
Support for flooding victims in Western Japan

Beginning in July 2018, we dispatched our trucks to the region to provide assistance. Aid consisted of both food and water. In spite of the heaving flooding, water was needed because many of facilities and pipes providing fresh water had become contaminated with sediment. In addition, the summer was unusually hot.

Officially we ended support for this region in May 2019.

We had been regularly sending aid boxes directly to families affected by the flooding.

We have received many postcards and letters thanking us for the support since last summer. 

This project could not have been possible with you.

We want to thank all of our supporters for making this project possible.

One additional update.

We recenly received a call for further support and will be looking at what we can do.

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Mihara Mayor, CEO, and Volunteer Driver
Mihara Mayor, CEO, and Volunteer Driver

Working with local government agencies and NPOs on the ground we were able to reach 1,092 families who had been affected by the flooding.

Many of these families either completely or partially lost their home and thus created an economic hardship for them.

We made a commitment to support these families by sending regular boxes of food from our main office in Tokyo. Each volunteers sorted food donations and packed boxes that had the essential items such as rice, cooking oil, canned fish/meat, noodles, and condiments along with sweets for children. We also included postcards for the recipient family to respond with a note to our supporters. As a custom in Japan, recipients want to show their appreciation and these postcards are one way to make that possible for them.

Delivery in Ninoshima, Hiroshima
Delivery in Ninoshima, Hiroshima
Locals in Ninoshima, Hiroshima
Locals in Ninoshima, Hiroshima
Uwajima water delivery
Uwajima water delivery
Uwajima water distribution point
Uwajima water distribution point
Uwajima assessment
Uwajima assessment

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Thanks to our supporters we were able to sign up over 750 households who were affected by the flooding to receive emergency care packages. Our staff visited the region in November to meet with local government officials directly providing assistance to flood victims. Through their cooperation over  5,000 households were made aware of our offer of assistance.

We have been sending ecah household that has registered with us a care package containging basic staples such as rice, miso, soy-sauce, canned goods, noodles, and condiments. Each box weights approximately 12kgs and has a market value of ¥15,000 ($138).

We will continue to provide assistance through the end of March, 2019. 

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Mihara City Mayor, 2hj CEO, and volunteer driver
Mihara City Mayor, 2hj CEO, and volunteer driver

We received a call on July 14ththat the Island of Ninoshima located in Hiroshima City and nearby Mihara City were in dire need of food, water and drinks. Within hours we confirmed what was needed and when it could be delivered. On the morning of July 16thwe delivered 4 tons of aid to these cities. We were able to meet the mayor of Mihara and the local official in charge of Ninoshima. It was thanks to the support of Global Giving that we were able to act quickly knowing that our supporters had a platform they could safely get funds to us.

We continued to provide aid to disaster areas in Hiroshima and Okayama prefectures. Our 4-ton truck has made eight trips to the region delivering food, drinks, and water to those affected by the flooding. We worked with NGOs, churches, and local government authorities to get the right aid to the right people at the right time. While most roads were quickly reopened, infrastructure supporting sewage and fresh water were heavily damaged and remained not fully functionally until only recently. Those affected by the floods looked to our drinks and water for support. 

The NGOs, churches and local government officials used our aid to facilitate communication with those whose houses were damaged, but had chosen to stay rather than seek housing elsewhere. While the reasons for staying vary with each household, it did create challenges and concerns for those responding to the flooding. The first concern was the safety of those still living in their damaged homes. Typhoons and heavy rain continued hit the region throughout summer and already saturated area could not absorb more. This led to an increase risk of sudden flooding. The second concern was the heat and humidity. While people were doing their best to remove debris from their houses, staying hydrated became a continual challenge. Lastly, there was concern that survivors may feel isolated and distraught over the series of flooding that had occurred. Many of those affected by the flooding are elderly and feel especially vulnerable. Our aid provided a reason for those groups to follow up with households they deemed at risk. 

Funds were also used to move 10,000 portions of rice from Fukushima directly to the disaster areas as well as our warehouse in Tokyo. We use the rice when we send care packages to households in the disaster region. This is an interesting connection because Fukushima was badly hit during the triple disasters of 2011. Through the Global Giving funds, we were able to assist those in Fukushima to provide aid to those Western Japan. In a sense, to help them give back to those who assisted them in 2011.

Phase 1 ended on September 30th. The focus of this phase was to provide large amounts of aid to NGOs, churches, and local governments for further distribution to shelters, temporary housing, and those who have stayed their home. Phase 2 started on October 1stand will run through March 2019.

Mihara City disaster aid center
Mihara City disaster aid center
Ninoshima Island Leader, 2hj CEO, and volunteers
Ninoshima Island Leader, 2hj CEO, and volunteers
Unloading aid in Ninoshima
Unloading aid in Ninoshima
Water distribution in Uwajima
Water distribution in Uwajima
Water distribution in Uwajima
Water distribution in Uwajima

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Organization Information

Second Harvest Japan

Location: Taito-ku, Tokyo - Japan
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @2hj_en
Project Leader:
Charles McJilton
Taito-ku, Tokyo Japan

Funded Project!

Combined with other sources of funding, this project raised enough money to fund the outlined activities and is no longer accepting donations.
   

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