Nurture 75 vulnerable children in the RedLightArea

by Apne Aap Women's Collective (AAWC)
Nurture 75 vulnerable children in the RedLightArea
Nurture 75 vulnerable children in the RedLightArea
Nurture 75 vulnerable children in the RedLightArea
Nurture 75 vulnerable children in the RedLightArea
Nurture 75 vulnerable children in the RedLightArea
Nurture 75 vulnerable children in the RedLightArea
Nurture 75 vulnerable children in the RedLightArea
Nurture 75 vulnerable children in the RedLightArea
Educational Sessions with Umang beneficiaries
Educational Sessions with Umang beneficiaries

Outreach: 

The toddlers of this community are susceptible to many forms of violence and abuse, such as being used as pawns for gambling and drug peddling, being exposed to pornography, physical fights, harassment of their mothers or other female family members, and sometimes even being assaulted themselves. Considering such an exploitative environment, our outreach team is the first and usually preferred point of contact between Apne Aap Women’s Collective and the community inhabiting Kamathipura and Falkland Road, the red-light districts of Mumbai.

With the aid of our dedicated outreach team, this quarter saw about 10 new members joining our Umang program. Upon enrollments, these beneficiaries have access to education (kindergarten), all forms of assistance with their health (ex: referrals, camps, nutritional support, etc.), therapies, interactive activities, exposure and recreational visits, and rehabilitative measures like night-shelter house amongst other general support and aid.

In this quarter, 335 home visits were done by our committed outreach workers (ORWs), where they meet their mothers and address any of the issues that they are having with their kids. They also reach out to women for admissions in the night shelter, assuring them about their kids’ security and health.

Education: 

From Alphabets to numbers, teachers mainly focused on identification of the alphabets and numbers. They also focus upon the awareness about their surroundings and general knowledge of things and people around them through various creative means such as educational puzzles, flashcard, games, toys and different things as resources, storytelling etc. The objective behind the educational activities is to make learning easy and fun.

This quarter, our Umang beneficiaries continued to learn alphabets, numbers, colors, shapes, Basic English and Hindi poetry and other fundamental literature of a kindergarten along with increasing their general knowledge.

Regular E-learning classes are also conducted through which the beneficiaries learn new rhymes and various moral stories.

Monthly assessments are conducted to track the record of the beneficiaries in the form or oral and written assessments. 55 oral assessments were done as well as 34 written assessments were done in the last three months. Most of our beneficiaries did well in the assessments, and some have even developed a greater understanding of alphabets and numbers because of illustrated medium of learning. Because of which, we could obtain the growth chart/progress reports of 48 beneficiaries.

Our long-term associate and a specialist in preschool curriculum, Ms. Marina Dutta also continued with her zestful activities, which include interactive games like puzzles, matching cards, role-playing, building blocks, creative illustrations, flashcards etc. Such activities help in developing fine motor, cognitive and social skills. This quarter, she had brought many storybooks and toys, and introduced new resource materials.
 
Apart from these assessments and activities, we have also maintained our regular garden visits- while constantly introducing newer games and activities to maintain their attention.

Health and Nutrition:

At AAWC, we place utmost importance on the health and nutritional aid provided to our beneficiaries. Acknowledging the fact that all of our beneficiaries are from a highly vulnerable and marginalized community, and live in environments that often trigger ill health- our activities range from spreading awareness on general hygiene, sanitation, and required medical support to holding quarterly health camps targeting specific ailments. We have also arranged periodic supply of sourdough breads, healthy salads and sandwiches, which complement the beneficiaries’ daily meals with varied tastes.

Along with this, we aid our beneficiaries with specialized awareness programs for their mothers (ex: neonatal care, medical treatments for contagious diseases, seasonal healthcare, etc.), routine medical referrals, nutritional aid provided through a well-designed diet chart, multivitamin and protein supplements, following up with hospitals and doctors, etc. This quarter, around 31 Umang members benefited from our monthly medical check-ups, and around 47 medical referrals were made. 11 beneficiaries were also given immunizations, which includes Hepatitis B, Polio, and Tetanus.

Nutritional aid in the form of healthy and warm meals, protein and multivitamin supplements, moringa (drumstick) seeds and soymilk was also continued to be provided on a regular basis. We could provide nutrition 6745 times to 34 beneficiaries and nutritional supplements in the form of multivitamins was provided 1433 times to 34 beneficiaries.


Counseling: 

Acknowledging the fact that most of our beneficiaries are born into single parents, violent or broken family structures- their first contact with society, we recognize the fact that these toddlers may not have formed satisfying relationships or learnt to emote transparently in their early childhood. To combat with their emotional instability and prevent any sort of mental health crisis in the future, we hold various therapy sessions with our Umang beneficiaries. These include one-to-one mentoring/Individual sessions, art therapy and referrals to external experts for aid with severe mental health issues.
 
Udaan Umang sessions: Having noticed that the Umang beneficiaries are closer to the adolescent girls (Udaan beneficiaries) who are members of AAWC, we realized that designing few sessions amongst them might lead to positive changes in both sets of beneficiaries. This quarter, the Udaan-Umang sessions included storytelling and games on the themes of discipline, morals, and kindness. Umang children had a resourceful and interesting time at these sessions, and have been displaying small gestures of faces of expressions by drawing it on chart papers them with the help of Udaan beneficiaries. Udaan girls also taught them patriotic songs.

As assumed, these sessions have led to higher bonding amongst the children, with the Umang toddlers finding role models and mentors in their older counterparts.

Social skills sessions: We conducted social skills/group sessions this quarter. These sessions are aimed at educating the young Umang children on behavioral aspects and routine formation. From teaching the children about washing hands regularly before meals to toilet training for the extremely young, these sessions are imperative in creating a fundamentally healthy and socially adept child. This quarter, some of the topics covered under this session have been good touch Bad touch, Toilet training and sanitation, respecting peers and elders, basic behavioral do’s and don’ts, food etiquettes, etc.

Child Future Planning Session (CFS) Mothers’ meeting: We conduct these meetings regularly in order to evaluate or plan the Umang beneficiaries’ future. One of the meetings had an agenda of discussing and sharing the information about the various identity documents for their kids. Mothers were informed and guidance was provided in order to obtain various documents for their children. Apart from that, health and hygiene was also one of the topics of discussion in the meetings. They were made aware about their kids’ hygiene and what wonders does it do to a human body.

 Night shelter: 

We also run our own rehabilitative night shelter for the most vulnerable toddlers and adolescent girls of women in prostitution. Providing a safe space away from the disturbances and brutalities of the red-light district, our night shelter provides a home for many young children who have never known the comforts of a family and healthy living. With a capacity of almost 20 toddlers, Umang beneficiaries of the night shelter have access to all the other Umang activities like education, health, empowerment, extra-curricular, recreational/exposure visits, and celebrations held at our centers. 2 new Umang beneficiaries were enrolled in the night shelter in the last 3 months.

Recreational Activities: 

As we know that “All work no play, makes jack a dull boy”, we equally try to establish a balance between educational and recreational activities for our beneficiaries.

This quarter, we collaborated with “The Robin Hood Army” who conducted storytelling sessions with the Umang beneficiaries. They also distributed snacks as refreshments after the activities.

We also conducted activities such as indoor and outdoor games, arts and crafts, Rakhi making, storytelling, watching quizzes on television and different types of painting. A few of the indoor activities include puzzles, memory game, animal jump, back walk and some of the new creative painting activities are hand print fish painting, coconut table making, peacock craft activity, fingers painting tree activity etc. All of our beneficiaries enjoyed these activities, and often look forward to more of these due to the fun and informal nature of such events. The outdoor games that the beneficiaries play are Football, Passing the parcel, one leg race etc.

Celebrations:

This quarter, Umang beneficiaries celebrated “Raksha Bandhan” and made rakhis with the material provided.They tied “Rakhis” on each other’s’ wrists with proper rituals and a promise to respect and protect each other. They even tied “Rakhis” to their teachers.

 Independence Day was also celebrated. Umang Beneficiaries wore new and colorful t-shirts and stood in queues resonating a flag. The teachers told them the importance of three colors in our tri-color flag and the reason behind celebrating “Independence Day”.  All of them ended the program singing the national anthem and the national song.

Janmashtami was celebrated, in which teachers decorated the Kindergarten (Balwadi room) with balloons. Older children built human pyramid and teachers assisted younger beneficiaries to climb on it and burst the balloons filled with chocolates. Beneficiaries also danced on Hindi song “Govinda re Gopala” along with teachers.

Umang beneficiaries celebrated Teacher’s day, in which older Umang beneficiaries enacted their teachers and program managers. They also taught younger Umang beneficiaries the way the kindergarten (Balwadi) teachers teach by mimicking them. In the last, Umang beneficiaries thanked their teachers.

ManpasandLife (MPL) NGO celebrated their 5th Anniversary, where they got in touch with us and organized a food drive for our Umang beneficiaries. They distributed food packets and sweets to the toddlers. The beneficiaries enjoyed and thanked the people from MPL NGO in consensus.

Puppet Fish Activity for Umang beneficiaries
Puppet Fish Activity for Umang beneficiaries
Health Camp for Umang beneficiaries
Health Camp for Umang beneficiaries
Activity based learning for Umang beneficiaries
Activity based learning for Umang beneficiaries
Storytelling sessions for Umang beneficiaries
Storytelling sessions for Umang beneficiaries
Umang Impact Statistics- July to September 2018
Umang Impact Statistics- July to September 2018
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Umang children in their new school uniforms
Umang children in their new school uniforms

 “One evening, I asked Mishti* if she wanted to eat a kela as she was extremely hungry and that’s all we had at the room. With a sheepish smile, she told me that it’s called a ‘banana’. It made me very happy to see her speaking in so many languages, and not just Hindi.” 


– An Umang beneficiary’s grandmother.

 

Outreach:

The toddlers of this community are susceptible to many forms of violence and abuse, such as being used as pawns for gambling and drug peddling, being exposed to pornography, physical fights, harassment of their mothers or other female family members, and sometimes even being assaulted themselves. Considering such an exploitative environment, our outreach team is the first and usually preferred point of contact between Apne Aap Women’s Collective and the community inhabiting Kamathipura and Falkland Road, the red-light districts of Mumbai.

With the aid of our dedicated outreach team, this quarter saw about 6 new members joining our Umang program.Upon enrollments, these beneficiaries have access to education (Balwadi), all forms of assistance with their health (ex: referrals, camps, nutritional support, etc.), therapies, interactive activities, exposure and recreational visits, and rehabilitative measures like night-shelter house amongst other general support and aid.

 

Education:

‘We have kept the month of May for revision of entire syllabus. From Alphabets to numbers, teachers mainly focused on identification of the alphabets and numbers. They started with alphabets from A to E with all the children. As it was observed in the last month that children from the age group 3-4 years of age could not identify the alphabets. Thus this month teachers started taking activities with the objective that children can identify the alphabets. The youngest children continued to practice standing, sleeping and slanting lines.’ Said the Program Manager of Umang.


This quarter, our Umang beneficiaries continued to learn alphabets, numbers, colors, shapes, basic English and Hindi poetry and other fundamental literature of a kindergarten. About 30-35 of our Umang beneficiaries were involved in monthly academic assessments in the last three months. Most of our beneficiaries did well in the assessments, and some have even developed their understanding of alphabets and numbers better because of illustrated charts and regular poem practices.

Our long-term associate and a specialist in preschool curriculum, Ms. Marina Dutta also continued with her zestful activities, which include interactive games like puzzles, matching cards, role-playing, building blocks etc. Such activities help in developing fine motor, cognitive and social skills. This quarter, she had brought many storybooks and toys, and introduced two new activities. The objective for these two activities was to teach the children not to tear books and destroy toys. After 3 sessions, it was observed that children do not tear books and throw toys as they play with it carefully and collectively.

 

Apart from these assessments and activities, we have also maintained our regular garden visits- while constantly introducing newer games and activities to maintain their attention.

One of the highlights this quarter has been the tuitions introduced for older Umang beneficiaries. The Umang beneficiaries, who shall be graduating to Udaan Program are now being introduced to tuitions to bridge the space between kindergarten and primary schooling. Most beneficiaries have taken to these classes with enthusiasm, while some are still grappling with the change in syllabus and pace. Yet, these tuitions ensure that the beneficiaries have additional time to pick up the pace of formal education and get at par with the schooling.



Health and Nutrition:

At AAWC, we place utmost importance on the health and nutritional aid provided to our beneficiaries. Acknowledging the fact that all of our members are from a highly vulnerable and marginalized community, and live in environments that often trigger ill health- our activities range from spreading awareness on general hygiene, sanitation, and required medical support to holding quarterly health camps targeting specific ailments. We have also arranged periodic supply of sourdough breads, healthy salads and sandwiches, which complement the beneficiaries’ daily meals with varied tastes.

Along with this, we aid our beneficiaries with specialized awareness programs for their mothers (ex: neonatal care, medical treatments for contagious diseases, seasonal healthcare, etc.), routine medical referrals, nutritional aid provided through a well-designed diet chart, multivitamin and protein supplements, following up with hospitals and doctors, etc. This quarter, around 44 total Umang members benefited from our monthly medical check-ups, and around 60 medical recurring referrals were made this quarter.

Nutritional aid in the form of healthy and warm meals, protein and multivitamin supplements, moringa (drumstick) seeds and soymilk was also continued to be provided on a regular basis.

 

Counseling:

Acknowledging the fact that most of our beneficiaries are born into single parents, violent or broken family structures- their first contact with society, we recognize the fact that these toddlers may not have formed satisfying relationships or learnt to emote transparently in their earl childhood. To combat further development of their emotional instability and prevent any mental health crisis in the future, we hold various therapy sessions with our Umang beneficiaries. These include one-to-one mentoring/Individual sessions, dog therapy, art therapy and referrals to external experts for aid with severe mental health issues.

Last quarter, one beneficiary was diagnosed with Autism and was undergoing occupational therapy for the same. Upon further tests and diagnosis, it has been recognized that she is not autistic but has slow learning issues. We have trained our teachers, day care workers and the night staff in communicating with this beneficiary in appropriate manner.

 
Umang Mothers meeting: This quarter, we held Mothers meeting to discuss about savings for their children and sustainable living. Our Filed director has mentored and led the sessions, which saw quite a positive response from all mothers. One of the mothers also shared with about the post office savings account she had opened for funds towards her child’s education, which further inspired the other women attending. These sessions are important to us as we strive to create sustainable and independent living among the mothers and their children.

 

Udaan Umang sessions: Having noticed that the Umang beneficiaries are closer to the adolescent girls (Udaan beneficiaries) who are members of AAWC, we realized that designing a few sessions between them may lead to positive changes in both sets of beneficiaries. This quarter, the Udaan-Umang sessions included storytelling and games on the themes of discipline, morals, and kindness. Our Umang children had a resourceful and interesting time at these sessions, and have been displaying small gestures of positive behavior like sharing their food, putting their peers to sleep, taking care of their younger friends, and helping out the teachers in managing discipline in classes etc.

As assumed, these sessions have led to higher bonding amongst the children, with the Umang toddlers finding role models and mentors in their older counterparts.

Social skills sessions: We introduceda new activity on social skills this quarter. These sessions are aimed at educating the young Umang children on behavior aspects and routine formation. From teaching the children about washing hands regularly before meals to toilet training for the extremely young, these sessions are imperative in creating a fundamentally healthy and socially adept child. This quarter, some of the topics covered under this session have been: good touch / bad touch, Toilet training and cleanliness, developing amicable relationship with other peers, accommodating all food habits and meals etc.



Night shelter:

We also run our own rehabilitative night shelter for the most vulnerable toddlers and adolescent girls of women in prostitution. Acting as a safe space away from the disturbances and brutalities of the red-light district, our night shelter provides a home for a lot of young children who have never known the comforts of a family and healthy living. With a capacity of almost 35 adolescent girls and 25 toddlers, the

members of the night shelter have access to all the other Umang activities like education, health, empowerment, extra-curricular, recreational and exposure visits, and celebrations held at our centers. Around 5 new Umang beneficiaries were enrolled in the night shelter in the last 3 months.

 

Recreational Activities:

Activities such as indoor and outdoor games, arts and crafts, story-telling sessions, watching quizzes on television, etc. were held this quarter for our Umang beneficiaries. A few of the indoor activities include footprint-painting, playing ball for developing motor skills, origami making, clay modeling, bubble painting, spray painting with toothbrushes, etc. All of our beneficiaries have enjoyed these activities, and often look forward to more of these due to the fun and informal nature of such events. Other outdoor games like badminton, tug of war, catch-and-throw etc. are also help regularly.

One of the highlights this quarter was the visit to the Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Musuem to learn clay molding and puppetry. All the attending beneficiaries had a great time losing themselves free creatively, and were praised immensely by the facilitators.


Celebrations:

This quarter, we celebrated Eid and Environment day with full vigor.

On 5th June, on the occasion of World environment day, we celebrated with both the Umang and Udaan beneficiaries. Udaan beneficiaries had taught Umang beneficiaries how the tree grows and what should be done to grow it. The three groups were given Seeds of Mango tree, soil, water and Pot, to plant the seed. Our teacher also illustrated how the seed is planted in the soil. Then one by one, Udaan beneficiaries followed the procedure by demonstrating to the umang personally.

Umang beneficiaries also celebrated Ramzaan Eid on 14th June 2018 by dancing on “Eid mubarak” Song.  Teachers explained them what is fraternity and how we should embrace each other with good spirit. All children wished each other Eid Mubarak. All the beneficiaries also immensely enjoyed the Chicken Biryani (a rice dish) and Sheer kurma (a famous Islamic dessert made with vermicelli and dry fruits)which was cooked for them especially to mark Eid.

a card made by Umang children for their teacher
a card made by Umang children for their teacher
Umang beneficiaries during in-class sessions
Umang beneficiaries during in-class sessions
some Umang beneficiaries during garden visits
some Umang beneficiaries during garden visits
Umang stats Qt.2
Umang stats Qt.2
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Umang children enjoying snacks at a local garden
Umang children enjoying snacks at a local garden

There is a beautiful sense of satisfaction when my child comes home on the weekends, and says ‘water’ and ‘toilet’ in English. Sometimes, I watch her talk in English with the people around, and a smile comes about on my face. I am extremely proud of Akshara* for becoming such a smart and sensitive child.”

– An Umang beneficiary’s mother.

 

Outreach: The toddlers of this community are susceptible to many forms of violence and abuse, such as being used as pawns for gambling and drug peddling, physical fights, harassment of their mothers or other female family members, and sometimes even being assaulted themselves. Considering such an exploitative environment, our outreach team is the first and usually preferred point of contact between Apne Aap Women’s Collective and the community inhabiting Kamathipura and Falkland Road, the red-light districts of Mumbai.

With the aid of our dedicated outreach team, this quarter saw about 14 new members joining our Umang program.Upon enrollments, these beneficiaries have access to education (Balwadi), all forms of assistance with their health (ex: referrals, camps, nutritional support, etc.), therapies, interactive activities, exposure and recreational visits, and rehabilitative measures like night-shelter house amongst other general support and aid.

 

Education: ‘We have designed a new timetable this quarter, wherein we have incorporated smaller 15-minute breaks between each educational activity for the children to absorb their learnings. These breaks have been quite useful for the children to calm down and start each session afresh.’ Stated the Program Manager (Umang) with a certain satisfaction in her tone. 


This quarter, our Umang beneficiaries continued to learn alphabets, numbers, colors, shapes, basic English and Hindi poetry and other fundamental literature of a kindergarten. About 30-35 of our Umang beneficiaries were involved in monthly academic assessments in the last three months. Most of our beneficiaries did well in the assessments, and some have even developed their understanding of alphabets and numbers better because of illustrated charts and regular poem practices.

Our long-term associate and a specialist in preschool curriculum, Ms. Marina Dutta also continued with her zestful activities, which include interactive games like puzzles, matching cards, role-playing, building blocks etc. Such activities help in developing fine motor, cognitive and social skills.

Apart from these assessments and activities, we have also maintained our regular garden visits- while constantly introducing newer games and activities to maintain their attention.

One of the highlights this quarter have been the introduction of e-learning classes for all the Umang children. Having begun as just using interactive CDs and laptops, the positive feedback has motivated us to include presentations on larger screens, more variety of educational DVDs and introducing them to other technological aids.

We also introduced the ‘Best Student’ chair, to inculcate the habit of healthy competition and positive reinforcements amongst our children. At the end of each day, we select a well-behaved and hardworking Umang student and give them the access to a special chair, which they can use during study time the next day. This is accompanied with applause and cheers from the rest of the Umang students. Since the introduction of this activity, we have seen a growth in mannered behavior and increased interests in the academic sessions. Along with this, such an activity is beneficial in instilling a respect for resources in the children. In this age, such a respect for material resources is imperative to create a future of sustainability.

Health and Nutrition: At AAWC, we place utmost importance on the health and nutritional aid provided to our beneficiaries. Acknowledging the fact that all of our members are from a highly vulnerable and marginalized community, and live in environments that often trigger ill health- our activities range from spreading awareness on general hygiene, sanitation, and required medical support to holding quarterly health camps targeting specific ailments. We have also arranged periodic supply of sourdough breads, healthy salads and sandwiches, which complement the beneficiaries’ daily meals with varied tastes.

Along with this, we aid our beneficiaries with specialized awareness programs for their mothers (ex: neonatal care, medical treatments for contagious diseases, seasonal healthcare, etc.), routine medical referrals, nutritional aid provided through a well-designed diet chart, multivitamin and protein supplements, following up with hospitals and doctors, etc. This quarter, around 30 total Umang members benefited from our monthly medical check-ups.

Nutritional aid in the form of healthy and warm meals, protein and multivitamin supplements, moringa (drumstick) seeds and soymilk was also continued to be provided on a regular basis.

 

Counseling: Acknowledging the fact that most of our beneficiaries are born into single parents, violent or broken family structures- their first contact with society, we recognize the fact that these toddlers may not have formed satisfying relationships or learnt to emote transparently in their earl childhood. To combat further development of their emotional instability and prevent any mental health crisis in the future, we hold various therapy sessions with our Umang beneficiaries. These include one-to-one mentoring/Individual sessions, dog therapy, art therapy and referrals to external experts for aid with severe mental health issues.

While the dog and art therapy sessions are held weekly, the individual sessions and referrals to external experts are held as per requirements. In the dog therapy sessions held this quarter, the therapists aimed at working on hyperactivity, discipline, emotiveness and social skills of our Umang beneficiaries. Through Tesla- a cuddly beige Labrador, our beneficiaries also continued to develop their sensitivities and empathies towards another being by brushing Tesla’s coat, feeding, playing and talking to her.

This quarter, one Umang beneficiary has been diagnosed with autism. She has been attending appropriate therapy sessions, and is still in the process of a final diagnosis at a renowned learning disability center of Mumbai.

Umang Mothers meeting: This quarter, we focused on ‘a safe space’ as the theme for our regular mothers’ meetings. As is a common concept with the mothers of the community, they often abandon their children in either paying-guest houses / neighbors at nights. This is because the women cannot keep their children in the brothels at night during trade, and have no homes of their own. Unfortunately, these spaces are extremely shady, dangerous and away from the supervision of the mothers. Hence, the meeting held by AAWC addressed how the mothers could find better spaces, rehabilitate the children at our night shelter/associated boarding homes, or keep the children with more trusted members.

Udaan Umang sessions: Having noticed that the Umang beneficiaries are closer to the adolescent girls (Udaan beneficiaries) who are members of AAWC, we realized that designing a few sessions between them may lead to positive changes in both sets of beneficiaries. This quarter, the Udaan-Umang sessions included storytelling and games on the themes of discipline, morals, and kindness. Our Umang children had a resourceful and interesting time at these sessions, and have been displaying small gestures of positive behavior like sharing their food, putting their peers to sleep, taking care of their younger friends, and helping out the teachers in managing discipline in classes etc.

As assumed, these sessions have led to higher bonding amongst the children, with the Umang toddlers finding role models and mentors in their older counterparts.

 

Social skills sessions: We introduceda new activity on social skills this quarter. These sessions are aimed at educating the young Umang children on behavior aspects and routine formation. From teaching the children about washing hands regularly before meals to toilet training for the extremely young, these sessions are imperative in creating a fundamentally healthy and socially adept child.

 

Night shelter: We also run our own rehabilitative night shelter for the most vulnerable toddlers and adolescent girls of women in prostitution. Acting as a safe space away from the disturbances and brutalities of the red-light district, our night shelter provides a home for a lot of young children who have never known the comforts of a family and healthy living. With a capacity of almost 35 adolescent girls and 25 toddlers, the members of the night shelter have access to all the other Umang activities like education, health, empowerment, extra-curricular, recreational and exposure visits, and celebrations held at our centers. Around 4 new Umang beneficiaries were enrolled in the night shelter in the last 3 months.

 

Recreational Activities: Activities such as indoor and outdoor games, arts and crafts, story-telling sessions, watching quizzes on television, etc. were held this quarter for our Umang beneficiaries. A few of the indoor activities include footprint-painting, playing ball for developing motor skills, origami making, clay modeling, spray painting with toothbrushes, etc. All of our beneficiaries have enjoyed these activities, and often look forward to more of these due to the fun and informal nature of such events.

'I loved the Kangaroo race!' said an excited Riya*. '...and I won the running race teacher.' chipped in an equally excited Priti*.

This quarter, we celebrated Annual Sports Day for all our Umang beneficiaries, wherein they participated in many kinds of races, won stationary kits and board games for prizes, and even enjoyed some refreshing snacks at the end of the day. This was a successful activity to share with the children about ideas of competition, sportsmanship and team building. All our children had a rather fun time participating in these races.

 

Celebrations:“Teacher… I want to fly the kite I made yesterday evening!” giggled a proud Mukta*, our 4-year-old Umang beneficiary while smiling contently at the kite she had created the earlier evening.

On the auspicious day of Makar Sankranti (popular Indian harvest festival), we took all our Umang beneficiaries to a local garden as part of the celebrations. They had an exciting time trying to the fly kites with their tiny hands- especially because they had made these kites themselves.

We also had a story-telling session wherein the Umang Program Manager and other kindergarten teachers taught our children about the importance of Sankranti, while emphasizing on the plight of farmers and agriculture in India.

After the kite flying and story-telling sessions, one of our Umang beneficiary also served the rest of her Umang friends some festive special snacks- Til laddoos (sweet balls made out of Sesame seeds) and jalebis (famous Indian street sweet). Such little activities help us in sensitizing Umang beneficiaries about the realities outside of the red light district, while trying to help them heal within.

Along with the Sankranti celebrations, we also held Republic Day and Holi celebrations at our center. At each of these, our children were involved in activities that explained the reasons behind these celebrations. Often in the form of arts and small theatrical plays, our Programs team ensures that the children understand these celebrations and their socio-cultural contexts. Holi celebrations also saw a grand meal of Kheer and Chicken biryani that was highly appreciated by all the children.

Umang children having fun at an indoor play center
Umang children having fun at an indoor play center
A snippet from Umang sports day
A snippet from Umang sports day
Kite flying held at a local garden
Kite flying held at a local garden
Umang children enjoying arts and crafts
Umang children enjoying arts and crafts
Umang 1Qt 2018 statistics
Umang 1Qt 2018 statistics
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Umang children during their kindergarten classes
Umang children during their kindergarten classes

Rushing into the room immediately after their visit to the garden, our Umang beneficiaries were brimming with excitement and hunger alike as soon as they had stepped inside the center.

Amidst such chaos, the Umang Program Manager witnessed a small incident of humanity. While a large chunk of the Umang beneficiaries had already queued for lunch, one of them had managed to cut the line and reach the serving space before others. Upon sudden and surprising realization of the same, she immediately put her plate back down, stepped out of the lane and let other behind her eat their lunch. When probed about her behavior she said, ‘if they had been standing here for longer, how can I eat my food before them?!’
Taken aback by the genuine concern and honesty in the words of this Umang beneficiary, the Program Manager then made an example of this beneficiary for positive behavior amongst her peers.

 

Outreach:

Walking through a dimly-lit and dilapidated building, our outreach team walks up a narrow flight of stairs to finally reach the pinjaras (cages) cramped on the third floor. Heaving, they squat so as to be able to communicate with the women sitting around on the cracked floor. Some women are enquiring about their child’s lives, while some more are seen talking to our team excitedly about an upcoming event organized by their children. These are women living in Kamathipura- Asia’s second largest red-light district, whose offspring are enrolled in our Umang program.

The toddlers of this community are susceptible to many forms of violence and abuse, such as being used as pawns for gambling and drug peddling, being exposed to pornography, physical fights, harassment of their mothers or other female family members, and sometimes even being assaulted themselves. Considering such an exploitative environment, our outreach team is the first and usually preferred point of contact between Apne Aap Women’s Collective and the community inhabiting Kamathipura and Falkland Road, the red-light districts of Mumbai.

With the aid of our dedicated outreach team, this quarter saw about 12 new members joining our Umang program.Upon enrollments, these beneficiaries have access to education (Balwadi), all forms of assistance with their health (ex: referrals, camps, nutritional support, etc.), therapies, interactive activities, exposure and recreational visits, and rehabilitative measures like night-shelter house amongst other general support and aid.

Education:

As is recognized by the Indian government, education is a fundamental right of every child and hence is also one of the most important tools of AAWC to prevent trafficking and prostituting of young children in the red-light districts of Mumbai.

Under our Umang program, we provide preschool educational services to all our beneficiaries. As part of our kindergarten curriculum, we undertake interactive educational exercises, monthly academic assessments, daily garden visits and other exposure/recreational visits as required.

‘As we introduced notebooks to children who are otherwise used to slates, they have found a new educational incentive. One child was so excited that when asked to obey the teachers, he agreed instantly. The notebook has become a tool of positive reinforcement. Every day whenever he completes his writing, he comes and shows me his notebook. I can see the happiness as well as pride on his face.’ Stated the Program Manager (Umang) with utmost joy in her voice.

This quarter, our Umang beneficiaries continued to learn alphabets, numbers, colors, shapes, basic English and Hindi poetry and other fundamental literature of a kindergarten. Some of the quick-grasping children have also been introduced to easy mathematics and English reading. About 35 of our Umang beneficiaries were involved in monthly academic assessments in the last three months. Most of our beneficiaries did well in the assessments, with no learning disabilities identified amongst the children.

Our long-term associate and a specialist in preschool curriculum- Ms. Marina Dutta also continued with her zestful activities, which include interactive games like puzzles, matching cards, role-playing, building blocks etc. Such activities help in developing fine motor, cognitive and social skills. This quarter, Ms. Dutta also arranged for a Santa Claus costume and encouraged one of our Balwadi (kindergarten) teachers to play the lead role in a story Ms. Dutta was to narrate. The story was aimed at explaining the concept of Christmas, and to spark a dialogue amidst our Umang beneficiaries about ‘The well-mannered child’ versus ‘The mischievous child’.

When asked about her thought behind such an activity, Ms. Dutta said: ‘We adults know that Santa Claus doesn’t exist, and we even joke about the same with younger children around us. But for these children, the concept of a Santa Claus is more than just a story. Often, Santa turns into their imaginary friend- a space for finding comfort and emotional stability; or a tool of incentivizing positive behavior. Either way, Santa then becomes very much real to these children. It is also important for the children to slowly grow into the concept of fictional characters, rather than bombard them with such reality at a tender age.’

Apart from these assessments and activities, we have also maintained our regular garden visits- while constantly introducing newer games and activities to maintain their attention. This quarter, we introduced warm-up exercises and group activities at the start and end of each session to bring a sense of community and closure to the beneficiaries. Unlike the simple individual playtime assigned earlier, this design provides for more spaces to interact and learn informal social skills amongst our beneficiaries.

 

Health and Nutrition:

At AAWC, we place utmost importance on the health and nutritional aid provided to our beneficiaries. Acknowledging the fact that all of our members are from a highly vulnerable and marginalized community, and live in environments that often trigger ill health- our activities range from spreading awareness on general hygiene, sanitation, and required medical support to holding quarterly health camps targeting specific ailments. We have also arranged periodic supply of sourdough breads, healthy salads and sandwiches, which complement the beneficiaries’ daily meals with varied tastes.

Along with this, we aid our beneficiaries with specialized awareness programs for their mothers (ex: neonatal care, medical treatments for contagious diseases, seasonal healthcare, etc.), routine medical referrals, nutritional aid provided through a well-designed diet chart, multivitamin and protein supplements, following up with hospitals and doctors, etc. This quarter, around 20 total Umang members benefited from our monthly medical check-ups. Due to the onset of winter and a constant change in weather, many of our Udaan beneficiaries contracted high fever, common cold and other respiratory issues in the last few months. Most of them were further prescribed blood tests, all of which were negative for any further testing and illnesses. Due to the swift intervention and daily visits to our collaborative hospital, we could tackle these issues meticulously. Nutritional aid in the form of healthy and warm meals, protein and multivitamin supplements, moringa (drumstick) seeds and soy milk was also continued to be provided on a regular basis.

 

Counseling:


As per ‘Kids Matter’, an Australian early-childhood mental health initiative, “Mental health in early childhood has been described as ‘an ability to form satisfying relationships with others, play, communicate, learn and experience the range of human emotions’ (Parlakian & Seibel, 2002). Research shows that the development of social and emotional skills influence and enhance children’s quality of life and lifelong learning (Denham & Weissberg, 2004)”.

Acknowledging the fact that most of our beneficiaries are born into single-parents, violent or broken family structures- their first contact with society, we recognize the fact that these toddlers may not have formed satisfying relationships or learnt to emote transparently in their earl childhood. To combat further development of their emotional instability and prevent any mental health crisis in the future, we hold various therapy sessions with our Umang beneficiaries. These include one-to-one mentoring/Individual sessions, dog therapy, art therapy and referrals to external experts for aid with severe mental health issues.

While the dog and art therapy sessions are held weekly, the individual sessions and referrals to external experts are held as per requirements. In the dog therapy sessions held this quarter, the therapists aimed at working on hyperactivity, discipline, emotiveness and social skills of our Umang beneficiaries. Through Tesla- a cuddly beige Labrador, our beneficiaries also continued to develop their sensitivities and empathies towards another being by brushing Tesla’s coat, feeding, playing and talking to her.
To make it further interesting, in one of the sessions we also introduced Udaan (5yrs to 18 yrs) beneficiaries (who were once a part of dog therapy sessions during their Umang membership- 2yrs to 5yrs) to share their dog therapy experiences with the current Umang beneficiaries. This led to a great bonding sessions, and also helped the newer Umang beneficiaries feel comfortable with the nature of the therapy.

Umang Mother’s meeting: We at AAWC understand the need for a mother figure and the ensuing disorders and instabilities in the child due to absence of such a relationship. While a large proportion of our beneficiaries do not receive adequate affection from their mothers due to various reasons like, nature of their mothers’ job which poses time restrictions, being children from an ex-partner/ illegitimate child, mothers’ health, addictions etc. When such a mother figure is combined with the fact that these children grow up in our night shelters, it is imperative that AAWC intervenes to create a harmonious and loving relationship between the child and its mother. Thus, AAWC’s mother meetings are often designed towards effective parenting to bridge the gaps in the relationship of a mother and her child.

This quarter, we focused on medical superstitions as the theme for our regular mothers’ meetings. Targeting superstitions about a child’s health- like ‘buri nazar’ (a common Indian form superstition of what in West is known as dark magic), using quacks and their unscientific methods to heal illnesses, considering contagious illnesses as an omen from the divine, etc., we tried to tackle many superstitions about medicine that most parts of this community hold. About 14 mothers have attended these meetings regularly.

Udaan Umang sessions: In the recent quarters, we have also initiated a new method to tackle feelings of belongingness, compassion and family in our beneficiaries. Having noticed that the Umang beneficiaries are closer to the adolescent girls (Udaan beneficiaries) who are members of AAWC, we realized that designing a few sessions between them may lead to positive changes in both sets of beneficiaries. As assumed, these sessions have led to higher bonding amongst the children, with the Umang toddlers finding role models and mentors in their older counterparts. This also helps the toddlers in developing their emotions and finding people to trust their emotions with. Along with this, the Udaan-Umang sessions also act as interesting academic pursuits- with the Udaan girls learning to mentor younger Umang beneficiaries; and the Umang beneficiaries being more willing to learn from ‘newer teachers’.


Night shelter:

We also run our own rehabilitative night shelter for the most vulnerable toddlers and adolescent girls of women in prostitution. Acting as a safe space away from the disturbances and brutalities of the red-light district, our night shelter provides a home for a lot of young children who have never known the comforts of a family and healthy living. With a capacity of almost 35 adolescent girls and 25 toddlers, the members of the night shelter have access to all the other Umang activities like education, health, empowerment, extra-curricular, recreational and exposure visits, and celebrations held at our centers. Around 6 new Umang beneficiaries were enrolled in the night shelter in the last 3 months. A moment of immense joy, every child enrolled in our night shelter is a life protected from the cruelties of the community.

 

Recreational Activities:

Activities such as indoor and outdoor games, arts and crafts, story-telling sessions, watching quizzes on television, etc. were held this quarter for our Umang beneficiaries. All of our beneficiaries have enjoyed the activities, and often look forward to more of these due to the fun and informal nature of such events. From playing football in an outdoor garden, to crafting their own Christmas trees- the activities this quarter were designed to provide a holistic and wholesome fine tuning to our children.

‘Do you go to school, children?’ Asked a passerby while our Umang children were returning from one such activity held outdoors. Upon scrutinizing the stranger well, one of the witty beneficiaries responded immediately with, ‘…yes ofcourse!’ while another chipped in with ‘We also learn poems and 1...2…3… numbers at our school!’. Though a very minute conversation, it made the overlooking Balwadi (Kindergarten) teacher rather happy to see the Umang children present their education with such pride.

Celebrations:

We celebrated Daan Utsav (Joy of Giving week) with our Umang beneficiaries. Designed keeping in mind the donation of affection and time over funds, this event saw about 7-8 volunteers lead a crafts session with the Umang beneficiaries out in a local garden. From teaching the young children to make rangoli (an Indian form of art in which patterns are created on-ground powdered colors) on plastic stencils to finger-painting on colored papers, the event saw a rather disciplined and joyous bunch of Umang children concentrating on the activities that ensued.

‘These children don’t seem like they’re just 3-year-old! It is magnificent how well-developed their fine motor skills are.’ Exclaimed a rather excited volunteer who had taken the initiative to lead the rangoli-making activity.

This quarter, we also celebrated events like Children’s day, Diwali, Christmas etc. The Udaan girls maneuvered each of these events, which involve planning, anchoring, handling food, etc. with aid from Umang toddlers as per their capabilities. During these celebration, we also held activities like ‘crafting lanterns’, ‘poetry on children’, ‘crafting Christmas trees’ etc. A lot of the products from these activities were then used as decorations for the same, thus leading to a well-rounded and planned cycle of productivity.

Umang beneficiaries attending a health camp
Umang beneficiaries attending a health camp
The joy of giving time! (Daan Utsav)
The joy of giving time! (Daan Utsav)
Umang beneficiary displaying her rangoli
Umang beneficiary displaying her rangoli
Interactive learning sessions at the kindergarten
Interactive learning sessions at the kindergarten
statistics for the quarter!
statistics for the quarter!
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

 

One warm evening, when our kids were walking back from Nagpada garden to the Kamathipura Centre, they stood by the gruelling traffic of Mumbai and set an example most adults around had forgotten to abide by. Waiting for the signal to turn green, one of our Umang beneficiaries Akash* began to eagerly explain the importance of traffic lights and what the green one meant in particular. 5 years old, Akash* further inspired the children around him to add onto this education and turn it into an interactive conversation. Struck by the beauty of witnessing such young children- holding hands, waiting at a busy traffic signal- the nearby traffic police walked up to our beneficiaries for a chat. Upon knowing of the activities in our Umang program, and convinced of the great potential our young beneficiaries have, the officer wished all of us at AAWC a very good luck. Then added, “One day, these children will become the much-needed responsible citizens of our country!”


Here is Savitri’s moment of victory!

Savitri*, a 3 year old Umang beneficiary, had been been enrolled in our program on a temporary basis. On arrival, she was under-nourished to the point where her body couldn’t handle the weight of her head. Walking lethargically, her head would plop to one side of her body; and within 5 minutes of walking- Savitri* would have to sit down to conserve her energy.
Brought in at such a state, we knew right away that Savitri* needed our special attention.

Along with keeping an eye on her food habits, we also referred her to a trusted doctor who finally told us the cause of her under-nourishment: no past consumption of solid food. We were further informed by the doctor that Savitri’s body had not had any experience of solid food as she was breastfed for past three years. Though this came as a slight surprise to us, we have had similar experiences in the past and hence knew the many ways to help Savitri* with healing positively: from mixing milk into her food to mashing rice into porridge, our staff took extra care in helping Savitri* develop a healthy relationship with her meals.

The process to bring Savitri’s* health back to normalcy has been a slow and patient one, but we have observed positive changes to her food consumption. She is beginning to appreciate communal eating, and often expresses a desire to eat by herself (and not be fed) with the rest of the children.

Eventually, and in just 2 months of this change- Savitri* now has a glow on her face! We are delighted with this progress, and are hoping that she shall recover fully by the end of this year.

*name changed to protect their identity

 

Know how your funds have been utilized this quarter:

 

EDUCATION:

At AAWC, we hold education- both formal and informal, as the most integral tool to aid our beneficiaries. We believe it is through education that our beneficiaries will gain access to spaces in the society which they are otherwise devoid of.

Keeping this in mind, this quarter saw quite a few assessments of our Umang beneficiaries’ academic pursuits. From evaluating children’s understanding of basic math to recitation of action songs, we held both a written and an oral examination for our beneficiaries. While the written examination involved worksheets with matching numbers and alphabets, the oral test was all about reciting monthly prayers, stories, names of animals and colors, action words etc. 

Such in-house assessments aid our beneficiaries in keeping abreast with their school work, while also motivating them to take their education as a personal responsibility.

 
Interactive educational sessions: We also understand that in-house assessments are not the only way to gauge and inspire such young minds. Hence, we have continued with our interactive educational sessions undertaken by Ms. Marina Dutt.

Ms. Dutta, Chairperson, The Museum Society of Mumbai and a committed volunteer with the AAWC, has conducted a total of 4 sessions this quarter. These sessions have ranged from learning human anatomy through a skeleton, to enhancing reading skills by matching flash cards. Our Umang beneficiaries were introduced to concepts of living and non-living things by sorting assorted materials like shells, marbles and coins. They also learnt of geometric shapes by observing mosaic floors, tiled with geometric designs. Such communal learning helps our beneficiaries in getting more involved with the world, and in observing and appreciating their surroundings.

Ms. Dutta also  held sessions to teach table etiquettes to our beneficiaries wherein they relished the tools of demonstration: dried dates, mixed fruits and oats salad, spinach and corn soup, and cheese and carrot soup!

 

HEALTH:

Health, like education, is a basic necessity and a fundamental right of any Indian citizen- as has also been provided in article 21 of the Indian Constitution(Chapter V Right to Health: Indian legislations and International documents, p.138 ). 

AAWC understands the importance of access to quality health care, and has always been proactive about our beneficiaries accessing only the best and certified healthcare professionals. Especially since our Umang beneficiaries’ mothers belong to a community that sometimes ignores its health due to inaccessibility, financial stress, fear of professional setups, etc. , it is imperative of AAWC to inculcate positive habits in our younger beneficiaries at the earliest.

Staying true to this belief of ours, we have held one comprehensive health camp this quarter. A total of 10 Umang beneficiaries had their check-up done during this camp, and none of the beneficiaries were recommended for a follow-up by the doctors. This demonstrates the fact that all of our beneficiaries were at healthy at the time of check-up, and didn’t require any further diagnosis/aid.

As for the eye check up, one of our beneficiaries complained of watering eyes and was prescribed medication: a dose of 1.25 ml syrup once a day.

Apart from these regular health camps, we also pay tremendous attention to the nutrition of our beneficiaries. Good nutrition is crucial to good health, and recognizing that fact- we have provided nutritional supplements 536 times every month to our beneficiaries.

 

Mothers’ Meeting: Mothers’ meetings are an important part of our health plan.

Aimed at connecting and communicating to the mothers about their children’s health-wise developments, these meetings make it a point to be absolutely intimate and conversational about the issues of their wards.


A total of 3 mothers attended the meeting in the month of July, wherein developments of each child were addressed separately with their mothers. Though our AAWC teachers put in efforts into convincing more mothers to join in, it sometimes becomes  difficult as the mothers might be involved in more financially beneficial activities at the same time. This is a challenge we are working on currently, and hope to solve in the coming months.

 As for the monthly meeting held in August - an interactive session on the significance of immunization was undertaken, apart from the above-mentioned conversations and discussions.

 

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES:

This quarter involved a lot of interactive activities aimed at developing out beneficiaries’ gross motor skills and creativity.

From indoor games designed to work their memory to teaching them about bird-life through a craft activity, our beneficiaries enjoyed wholly the experiences of learning beyond the books.

As for indoor activities, we held ‘throw a ball in the bucket’; while skipping, football and pass-the-ball were held as part of outdoor activities.


From making a clock with paper plates, to creating paper fans- our beneficiaries enjoyed innumerable art-based activities this quarter. While each activity was designed to introduce new academic concepts to our beneficiaries, it was also kept in mind to make the activities communal and fun.

We at AAWC recognize the power of learning through group activities. Apart from instilling a sense of team-work and making academics fun- such activities also become spaces for our beneficiaries to explore their artistic and creative talents.

Apart from these, our beneficiaries were also involved in making umbrellas using paper plates and straws, and painting flowers with their thumb-prints.

 

COUNSELLING:

As you have read above, we place a lot of importance on the health of our beneficiaries. Mental health, too, is as important to us as the physical well-being of our beneficiaries. We design our programs keeping in mind the emotional and mental capacities of our beneficiaries, especially because they are between the ages of 2-10 which is a crucial period for children to grow into mature and sensible adults.

Dog Therapy Sessions: Founded on that belief was our participation in dog therapy sessions. Lexi, a mid-sized beagle, was accompanied by two adults and our young beneficiaries in solving puzzles, and fetching vegetable and fruit cards. The trainer-dog, Lexi, was also involved in teaching the beneficiaries in learning etiquettes and polite phrases like ‘Please give me that biscuit’, ‘Thank you’ and ‘Welcome’.

Apart from turning into fascinating learning experiences, such dog therapy sessions also double up as spaces for our beneficiaries to develop a sense of care and kindness for fellow beings. Keeping in mind that our Umang beneficiaries belong to a community that is often exposed to sexual and physical forms of violence and disorder, such early intervention into their emotional capacities is essential for their welfare in the long term.

 

CELEBRATIONS:

At AAWC, we realize that community celebrations are a vital space for our beneficiaries to simply spend time with each other and grow into a sense of belonging. As a lot of our beneficiaries are night shelter seekers, we understand that they spend a massive amount of time growing up away from their biological family. From this understanding of ours comes the need to hold community celebrations, and make our beneficiaries feel at home.

This quarter, we celebrated Friendship day, Ganesh Chaturthi, Rakhi, Eid-ul-Fitr, Dussehra etc.

Eid-ul-Fitr Celebrations: One of our most special events was Eid-Ul-Fitr.  Dressed up in new clothes and white scarves, the beneficiaries hugged, and greeted each other with ‘Eid Mubarak!’ The beneficiaries also danced to a few Bollywood qawwali songs, and then they sat down to gorge on warm Chicken Korma, Jeera rice and Vegetable Raita. They also enjoyed sheer kurma as the evening snack that day.



HOME VISITS:

We at AAWC pride ourselves in being more than just providers of resources; we understand that development and growing up is a multi-faceted experience for our beneficiaries. For those beneficiaries who pass out from our Umang Program and are placed in private/government schools, we conduct regular house-visits and keep track of their academic and emotional progress. Ideally, once the beneficiaries pass out from our Umang program- they are assumed to be the responsibility of the schools they get enrolled into. Yet, we do not abide by such thought process, and take personal interest in all the alumni of the Umang program. This quarter, one house visit was done as only one of the beneficiaries was of age to join a formal education/schooling.

*Photos have been blurred to protect the identities of our beneficiaries under the Child Protection Laws of India

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
 

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating.

Get Reports via Email

We'll only email you new reports and updates about this project.

Organization Information

Apne Aap Women's Collective (AAWC)

Location: Mumbai, Maharashtra - India
Website:
Project Leader:
Manju Vyas
CEO
Mumbai, MH India

Retired Project!

This project is no longer accepting donations.
 

Still want to help?

Find another project in India or in Child Protection that needs your help.
Find a Project

Learn more about GlobalGiving

Teenage Science Students
Vetting +
Due Diligence

Snorkeler
Our
Impact

Woman Holding a Gift Card
Give
Gift Cards

Young Girl with a Bicycle
GlobalGiving
Guarantee

Sign up for the GlobalGiving Newsletter

WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.