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Medical Support for Rohingya women and children

by A-PAD KOREA(Asia Pacific Alliance for Disaster Management)
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Medical Support for Rohingya women and children
Medical Support for Rohingya women and children
Medical Support for Rohingya women and children
Medical Support for Rohingya women and children
Medical Support for Rohingya women and children
Medical Support for Rohingya women and children
Medical Support for Rohingya women and children
Medical Support for Rohingya women and children
Medical Support for Rohingya women and children
Medical Support for Rohingya women and children
Medical Support for Rohingya women and children
Medical Support for Rohingya women and children
Medical Support for Rohingya women and children
Medical Support for Rohingya women and children
Medical Support for Rohingya women and children
Medical Support for Rohingya women and children
Medical Support for Rohingya women and children
Medical Support for Rohingya women and children
Medical Support for Rohingya women and children

1. Brief description of the camp

  The   Rohingya people in Cox’s Bazar heavily rely on humanitarian assistance for all their basic needs including food,shelter,water,health and other life-saving needs. Most oft he women had gone through severe trauma, lack of safe delivery, ANC and PNC support and now living in extremely difficult conditions. In this situation Community Initiative Society (CIS) with the support of A-PAD Korea provided emergency health service in Jamtoli Rohingya Camp – 15 of Ukhiya of Cox’s Bazar District. 

2. Emergency Medical Service to te Rohingya women and children

  CIS with the suppor of A-PAD Korea provided the emergency health service to the Rohingya women and children in Jamtoli Rohingya camp of Ukhiya through established Comprehensive Primary Health Care Center(CPHCC). During the service period more than 2,000 patients were treated. 

 The Rohingya people do not have any money to buy medicine and get pathological service. CIS with the supprot of A-PAD Korea and GlobalGiving provided all kind of necessasry medicine according to docotr prescriptions and oral saline to all patients, who came to the health get the health service.

3. Project progress status

 Totally 2120 Rohingya patient took the health care services from the emergency health service by getting medical comsultation and medicine to the Rohingya people of Cox's Bazar of Bangladesh. It was very much helpful for Diarrheoa, Dysentery, ANC, PNC, infectious Disease and respiratory, BR. Astma, Diabetic, Hypertention, Heart Disease and malnutrition. The Rohingya people also practicing their health and hygiene system by getting the health and hygiene education and have the safe driking water from different water sources provided by various national, international and government agencies. On the other hand 39 Rohingya women and children have nourishing meal by getting nutrition package.

 

4. Thank you for your support

  By providing the emergency health service to the Rohingya women and children with the partnership can establish a field to work for local community in Bangladesh. In this regards CIS with the help of DCH Trust organized several meeting with local communities and private organizations and also visited local health post and local community. On the other hand, by the GlobalGiving funding, monitorion from CIS and A-PAD Korea could provide emergency health service to the Rohingya women and chlidren in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. 

 We deeply appriciate for your support. We are going to keep helping Rohingya women and childeren. Thank you.

 

 

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EMERGENCY HEALTH CARE SUPPORT TO FORCEFULLY DISPLACED MYANMAR CITIZENS IN COX'S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

 

IMPLEMENTATION REPORT

Period of implementation: 15 January 2020 - 14 February 2020 Implementing Organization: Community Initiative Society (CIS) Supported by : A-PAD Korea

 

 

mmunity Initiative Society (CIS) Supported by : A-PAD Korea, GlobalGiving

 

*PROJECT OVERVIEW

-Project Name

Emergency Health Care Support to Forcefully Displaced Myanmar Citizens in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh

-Duration of Project

01 Month Completed by 14 February 2020

-Implementation Period

15 January 2020 - 14 February 2020

-Location of Project

Jamtoli Rohingya Camp (Camp - 15), Thaingkhali union, Ukhiya of Cox's Bazar

-No. of beneficiaries

2000 Rohingya Patients,

-Name of Partner(s)

Community Initiative Society (CIS) / A-PAD Korea

-Name of Funder(s)

A-PAD Korea  / GlobalGiving

-Total Budget

USD 11,000 

 

 

*Project summary

 -Project

Emergency Health Care Support to Forcefully Displaced Myanmar Citizens in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh

-Objectives

To improve maternal and child health services in refugees camps in Cox's Bazar through increasing access to an enhanced and adequate health maternal and child services.

To promote the development of community based system of care, including oral healthcare for pregnant women, children and their families

-Output 1

Establishment Emergency Health Care Support to Forcefully Displaced Myanmar Citizens through Primary Health Care Center in Jamtoli Camp -

-Activity

Emergency Out Patients Service and Pediatrics Care

Basic pathological services

Provide medicine according to doctor advice to the Rohingya Patients

-Output 2

Uploading the Information on Social Network Service (SNS) and Website

Upload activities and information in SNS and CIS Website

 

 

*BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE CAMP

  The Rohingya people in Cox's Bazar heavily rely on humanitarian assistance for all their basic needs including food, shelter, water, health and other life-saving needs. Most of the women had gone through severe trauma, lack of safe delivery, ANC and PNC support and now living in extremely difficult conditions. In this situation Community Initiative Society (CIS) with the support of A-PAD Korea provided emergency health service in Jamtoli Rohingya Camp - 15 of Ukhiya of Cox's Bazar District. During the health service CIS learnt that the pregnant mother do not get ANC and PNC service, proper home delivery service. Due to living in a crowded tent children are suffering from pneumonia, asthma, measles, diarrhoea, skin disease, diphtheria and

 common cold, viral fever etc. So CIS provided 24/7 Emergency Health Care service to the Rohingay People and a mobile clinic in Jamtoli Camp - 15 of Ukhiya. To disseminate the information to global, CIS has established a website and uploaded the information of present health condition of Rohingya people in social media.

 Emergency out Patients Service and Pediatrics Care CIS with the support of A-PAD Korea provided the emergency health service to the Rohingya People in Jamtoli Rohingya Camp of Ukhiya Upazila through established Comprehensive Primary Health Care Center (CPHCC). During the service period more than 2000 patients of different departments like medicine, paediatric, Gynae, ENT, Skin and VD were treated during the health service. The common complications of the patients were Diarrheoa, Dysentery, ANC, PNC, Infectious Disease and respiratory infection, Br. Astma, Diabetic, Hypertention, Ishchemic Heart Disease and Gastroentrites.

  Pathological service to the Rohingya Patients CIS has established a basic pathological diagnostic center in CPHCC in Jamtoli Camp-15. To ensure quality health care service CIS with the support of A-PAD Korea provided pathological service in CPHCC. More than 500 patients got the pathological service from different departments.

 Medicine Support as Rohingya Patient treatment The Rohingya People do not have any money to buy medicine and get pathological service. So CIS with the support of A-PAD Korea provided all kind of necessary medicine according to doctor prescriptions and oral saline to all patients, who came to the health get the health service.

To disseminate the information to global, CIS has established a website and uploaded the information of present health condition of Rohingya people in social media. The activity helps to raise the issue of Rohingya Crisis to the global people.

 *Outcome of the Project

 Totally 2120 Rohingya patient took the health care services from the emergency health service by getting medical consultation and medicine to the Rohingya People of Cox's Bazar of Bangladesh. It was very much helpful for Diarrheoa, Dysentery, ANC, PNC, Infectious Disease and respiratory infection, Br. Astma, Diabetic, Hypertention, Ishchemic Heart Disease, Gastroentrites and malnutrition. The Rohingya people also

 practicing their health and hygiene system by getting the health and hygiene education and have the safe drinking water from different water sources provided by various national, international and Government agencies. On the other hand 39 Rohingya women and children have nourishing meal by getting Nutrition Package

 

*Learning 

 Comprehensive Primary Health Care Centre with well equipment is very effective to ensure the health service for Rohingya People especially for the pregnant women. Continue to follow-up the patient Diarrhoea, Dysentery, Water Born Disease, Skin disease, ANC, PNC etc. Increase the transport facilities for emergency patient to transfer to secondary hospital. Increase health facilities in these areas. Diagnosis Facilities (Pathology) More Medicine Facilities.

 

*CONCLUSION

 By providing the emergency health service to the Rohingya People CIS with the partnership can establish a field to work for local community in Bangladesh. In this regards CIS with the help of DCH Trust organized several meetings with local communities and private organizations and also visited local health post and local community. On the other hand by the funding, monitoring from CIS and A-PAD Korea could provide emergency health service to the Rohingya People in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh and also facilitate the local community.


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Rohingya's dilemma may lead to prolonged stay in refugee camps


In Cox's Bazar refugee camp of Bangladesh, it is estimated that around 86,000 children were born last year alone. More and more children, who aren't welcomed anywhere, keep on coming, but instead of the problem being solved, more and more relief organizations and NGOs are leaving. In the case of camp 15, there were up to eight clinics operated by NGOs from various countries, but only two are running as of now. As the clinics shrink, patients are concentrated on the remaining clinics, increasing the burden on them and making the situation of refugees worse.

The Rohingya refugee crisis began on August 25th, 2017, after the massacre conducted by the Myanmar forces. When some Rohingya rebels raided the Myanmar police post, the Myanmar military, who already had hostility towards the Rohingya tribes, launched a massive sweep as an excuse. The Rohingya, who fled from the military repression, began to cross the border to Bangladesh. Refugee camps were formed along the roads, and refugee camps continue to expand in size.

In recent years, negative public opinion has been rising in Bangladesh. The government states that Bangladesh is also a poor country with the world's highest population density, so it is realistically impossible to accept refugees. Bangladeshi military and police guard the streets of refugee camps and control the Rohingya's movement. The Bangladesh government has even banned Bengali education in refugee camps, fearing refugees will settle in Bangladesh. Mr. A (age 42), a Bangladeshi citizen, who we've on the street corner of the camp said, “Bangladesh already has too many people living within a narrow area. Many people are poorer than the Rohingya. They must go back to Myanmar again. ”

No solution is available yet. Bangladesh and Myanmar governments continue to negotiate refugee repatriation, but there is little progress. Rohingya refugees are also lukewarm in their return to Myanmar. It is because they lack the belief that the same massacre that happened 2 years ago will never happen again in Myanmar.

The negative public opinion of the Rohingya is still overwhelming in Myanmar. In fact, the Rohingya, who remain in Myanmar, is known to be still in poor conditions. "The Rohingya in Rakhine, Myanmar, is living in a terrible condition. They are under constant watch without any freedom of movement and have limited access to health and education," said Phil Robertson, the deputy director of Asia at the Human Rights Watch (HRW), an international human rights group, through EFE communication on the 25th.

NGO officials working at refugee camps said, “Both Myanmar and Bangladesh aren't opening arms any time soon so it's going to be difficult to come up with a solution. The situation is likely to be prolonged. ”

* Kim Pan, a reporter for the Kookmin Ilbo newspaper, was accompanied by A-PAD Korea on monitoring the Rohingya refugee camp. The above is an excerpt from some of the entire articles.

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This is a documentary that CIS(CommunnityInitiativeSociety), the partner of A-PAD Korea, took during their works in rohingya refugee camp. You can see how we are working in the camp and how the donation was used for thr refugees.

https://youtu.be/NJqbbsr6oDo

A-PAD Korea has been providing food and medical assistance and operating clinics for Rohingya refugee women and children, including pregnant wo men, since 2017.

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Md. Golam Motofa, the member secretary & executive said that We have many future plans. For example, we want to build up an efficient Disaster Response Team who could move swiftly to any disaster-affected area for providing their service to the affected peple. CIS is working globally to establish an integrated disaster-reilience society. In this purpose we'll be working together with UN Agency, Asia Pacific Alliance for Disaster Management(A-PAD), and ADRRN. Morever we'll work to preserve human rights of the affected people. 

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The essay was written by Ha Seung-chang, one of the donors of A-PAD KOREA. He monitored Rohingya refugee camps from Aug. 10-14 this year. As the Blue House's first senior presidential secretary for social innovation, he took the lead in innovation in Korean society. Below is the full text of the essay.

-------------------------------

[BECAUSE]

Rohingya refugee camp, which the international community should not turn a blind eye to

 

Twenty years ago, Maung Zaw, a Myanmarese, came to Korea for political exile as a democratization movement. He thought that the Korean civil movement, which developed after democratization, would be a necessity in Myanmar in the future, so although part-time, he even worked for a Korean civil organization. At that time, Maung Zaw did not have legal status. It was because he was not recognized as a 'refugee'. At the time, we did not have refugee law but were registered by the UNHCR. It was a time when we were not often sought after by refugees for political or other reasons.

 

With the help of sympathy from a law firm, he filed a lawsuit for refugee status against the country, and I accompanied the whole process of him receiving official recognition of refugee status after winning the lawsuit. He has returned to his homeland after Aung San politically recovered and is continuing the civil movement of helping the youth. Due to this experience, it wasn't easy to understand that those who were refugees themselves at one time have made the Rohingya refugees.

 

These questions led me to a Rohingya refugee camp in Kutu Falls, Bangladesh, through a proposal from A-PAD Korea, a relief organization, last August. The genocide of Myanmar's military has led to more than a million Rohingya living in refugee camps. Harsh violence against women were constantly being reported. Of course, there were people who talked about Rohingya's history during the British colonization as well. But even if some of the Rohingya conducted misdeeds during the British colonies, there is no reason to perform an anti-human rights genocide.

 

Rohingya refugee camps, set up with temporary tents in the wasteland, had no water and sewage facilities. Originally, it was a barren land where even the Bangladeshi people didn't live in because there was no ground for farming or underground water to sell wells. There are currently 31 camps, with 86,000 newborns born last year. Infections and illnesses are widespread amongst the camps, and epidemics are commonplace.

 

A-PAD Korea, which runs specialized clinics for women and infants at camps 14 and 15, also sees an average of 500 patients per day. Rohingya women who have lived in Islamic culture are hard to diagnose unless they are treated by female doctors. Luckily there was a female doctor, who was difficult to liaise with and hire. 68% of the patients are female and 33% are under 15 years old, indicating that the facility's activities are operating for the weak even amongst the Rohingya camps.

 

Two years have passed since the formation of refugee camps and unlike the initial period, many NGOs are withdrawing. Eight clinics were in operation at camp 15, but currently, only two remain. Patients are flocking to the remaining clinics, and the remaining NGOs are having a difficult time in treating them all. Whether the Rohingya settles here or returns to Myanmar, providing more than a certain level of health care is still an important issue until the problem is resolved.

 

Bangladesh's rural landscape on the road to Rohingya refugee camps is vastly poor. Bangladeshi people, one of the poorest countries in the world, are the ones helping refugees with the fundamental despair of lack of freedom and a non-guaranteed future. The international community should not turn away from this situation.

 

Although I couldn’t fully understand the status of the camp within the short span of time, I was able to confirm that the donations were being used properly. Nevertheless, it hurt my heart to see the relief organizations that had to record the process of providing relief were unintentionally hurting the self-esteem of the refugees. The awkward gestures and eyes of the refugees who were receiving relief supplies are hard to forget. I hope that the small but relevant process of relief will be carefully planned so as not to hurt their heart.

 

Now for me, the life of Rohingya refugees may feel like a distant thing again. No, it's the reality that there's a high possibility of me forgetting about it. I will try to not forget that there are lives in temporary tents who weigh the same as me. Also, the fact that just a little bit of my heart will make their lives a little better as well.

  

- Ha Seung Chang, a visiting professor at Yonsei Universit

                                Former the Blue House Senior Presidential Secretary for Social Innovation

 

http://www.hani.co.kr/arti/opinion/because/911480.html#csidxffb8d5f86a008f98d2c1d0261761142

 


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    Organization Information

    A-PAD KOREA(Asia Pacific Alliance for Disaster Management)

    Location: Seoul - South Korea
    Website:
    Facebook: Facebook Page
    Project Leader:
    Doohwan Ko
    Seoul, South Korea
    $12,013 raised of $30,000 goal
     
    112 donations
    $17,987 to go
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