Dignity for displaced women and girls in Lebanon

by Developmental Action without Borders/Naba'a
Dignity for displaced women and girls in Lebanon
Dignity for displaced women and girls in Lebanon
Dignity for displaced women and girls in Lebanon
Dignity for displaced women and girls in Lebanon
Dignity for displaced women and girls in Lebanon
Dignity for displaced women and girls in Lebanon
Dignity for displaced women and girls in Lebanon
Dignity for displaced women and girls in Lebanon
Dignity for displaced women and girls in Lebanon
Dignity for displaced women and girls in Lebanon
Breast Cancer Campaign
Breast Cancer Campaign

Background during and after the implementation of the project;

After conducting a field survey in the Bourj Hammoud area, the problems were identified and categorized as materialistic, social and psychological.

Materialistic problems: Before the explosion, the living and economic situation in Lebanon, in general and specifically, in Bourj Hammoud area already was not that good, and then the explosion occurred and caused the situation to deteriorate more. The losses were embodied by the destruction of homes, shops and private companies in addition to the inability of getting the basic needs for living (securing foodstuff ...) that were discovered through field and home visits by social workers in the Bourj Hammoud area, and this situation in turn has led to the emergence of many problems that fall under the social problems

Social problems: As a result of the materialistic losses that occurred in the region, the level of unemployment increased after the destruction of the work and livelihoods of the citizens, and thus led to the emergence of high cases below the poverty line.

In addition to the emergence of various cases of bullying, and violence that manifested in different forms between members of the society in general and the families specifically.

Psychological problems: all the factors that were previously mentioned, material and social problems, especially the explosion, which had a major role in the emergence of psychological problems and disorders for a large segment of the population of Burj Hammoud, which are manifested by the symptoms of several disorders like depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and panic attacks ... Where it appeared on individuals of different ages, whether they were children, adults, or elderly, it affected everyone who was near to the explosion.

Naba’a Achievements; During the last period, The most highlighted achievements during the last period;

  • We at Naba’a are doing all we can to help all affected communities during this extraordinary crisis. Our assistance efforts go to all: Lebanese, refugees and others who were affected without distinction. The devastating impact of the explosion is compounding the challenges currently faced by Lebanese and refugees and adding even more difficulties as families were struggling to survive with the economic crisis that was exacerbated by the impact of COVID-19.
  • 3240 parents and caregivers motivated to be engaged in their children learning and well-being.
  • The psychosocial support sessions focused on groups, as they were formed by referring service applicants who were visited in their homes, and the groups were divided into:
  • The women's groups, which included 75 women, were divided into 5 groups, 10 women within the each group. in these groups it also included 23 men. The following conducted activities were art therapy, psychological drama, psychological and social support activities, and parental therapy. Among 50 women 57 were referred for follow-up by a psychologist as part of individual psychological support sessions for each beneficiary.
  • The division of the groups of children's sessions were according to age (6-14):

-Art therapy sessions for children aged 6 to 10 years

- Psychosocial support "sessions for children "She deals or “I deal with awareness sessions for girls and boys from 11 to 14 years old

- Psychosocial support sessions for all age groups

  • 100 children were targeted, divided into groups according to social and psychological needs. The psychologist referred 30 new children for individual follow-up.
  • It is worthy to note that, two child friendly psychosocial spaces were established at two UNRWA clinics (one in Ein El Helweh and one in Wadi El Zeni), where 2350 children whom their families access UNRWA clinics participated and joined the activities in these spaces.

 

Case Study;

Beneficiary profile

  1. Code: R1
  2. Date of birth: 2003
  3. Nationality: Syrian
  4. Sex: Female
  5. Referred by: Social Worker
  6. Reason for referral: isolation, psychological stress
  7. Risk level: High
  8. Social status; Divorced

 

Notes: The beneficiary is currently married to someone else and has no children.

Economic and living situation of the beneficiary

  1. Work: Unemployed Unstable Stable
  2. Type of work: Stitching

 

  1. Is he/she receiving financial assistance? No
  2. Family income: good average low bad
  3. Nature of the residence: Landlord Rent hosted   tent
  4. Number of rooms: 2
  5. Does anyone else live in the house with the family: The beneficiary and her husband live with her parents and her siblings

Additional Observations on the Living Situation of the Case:

The living and economic situation of the beneficiary is terrible as the family of 8 members live in a house consisting of only 2 rooms which lacks the basic home furnishings.

Summary of the background/history of the beneficiary and the problems suffered from:

After observing the beneficiary’s situation through her participation in awareness sessions, she began talking openly about her situation among the Psycho Social Support group members (group of girls aged 14-20), where she talked about the consequences of early marriage that she faced and suffered from, as she was forcibly ordered by her father to marry a man when she was 15 years old. This early marriage shortly led to family problems and complications including constant insults to her by the husband's parents, leading her to divorce few months after her marriage.

Moreover, after her divorce, she received insults from her own family who considers divorce as a shame and a social defect, where the mother told her, "You are just a divorced girl and so you are with us to serve us."

All that has been addressed and said to her had led to the emergence of high-risk psychological symptoms.

Psychological and Social Symptoms Observed:

- Community isolation (spends days without communicating or meeting with a family or friend)

- Feelings of permanent sadness (most of the time)

- Constant crying

- Fear of facing people

- Loss of self-confidence and loss of trust in people

- Sleep disorders (insomnia)

- Eating disorders (anorexia)

- Nail biting

- Hair cutting (self-torture for revenge)

- Harming her body by cutting off her wrists and arms

Data Collection Method:

Data is collected through the psycho-social support sessions and awareness sessions given, as well as follow-up via the telephone and home visit.

   Intervention and follow-up Methods:

Intervention was conducted in the following ways:

  • Awareness sessions (early marriage, gender-based violence, gender versus sex)
  • Psychosocial support sessions (SHE DEAL), how to deal with risks
  • Art therapy sessions (your strengths and weaknesses, fears and sources of strength, your position in society, expression of emotions)
  • Referral to the psychologist for follow-up

 

Recommendations:

- Follow-up meetings with the psychologist through individual sessions on a weekly basis

- Continue participating in the sessions that she had begun as a recommendation by the social worker and at the request of the beneficiary herself (awareness sessions, art therapy sessions, social psychological support sessions).

Distributing Food Kits
Distributing Food Kits
GBV Campaign
GBV Campaign
Risks of child marriage session
Risks of child marriage session
Trip for children
Trip for children

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GBV awareness session
GBV awareness session

Background during and after the implementation of the project;

After conducting a field survey in the Bourj Hammoud area, the problems were identified and categorized as materialistic, social and psychological.

Materialistic problems: Before the explosion, the living and economic situation in Lebanon, in general and specifically, in Bourj Hammoud area already was not that good, and then the explosion occurred and caused the situation to deteriorate more. The losses were embodied by the destruction of homes, shops and private companies in addition to the inability of getting the basic needs for living (securing foodstuff ...) that were discovered through field and home visits by social workers in the Bourj Hammoud area, and this situation in turn has led to the emergence of many problems that fall under the social problems

Social problems: As a result of the materialistic losses that occurred in the region, the level of unemployment increased after the destruction of the work and livelihoods of the citizens, and thus led to the emergence of high cases below the poverty line.

In addition to the emergence of various cases of bullying, and violence that manifested in different forms between members of the society in general and the families specifically.

Psychological problems: all the factors that were previously mentioned, material and social problems, especially the explosion, which had a major role in the emergence of psychological problems and disorders for a large segment of the population of Burj Hammoud, which are manifested by the symptoms of several disorders like depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and panic attacks ... Where it appeared on individuals of different ages, whether they were children, adults, or elderly, it affected everyone who was near to the explosion.

Naba’a Achievements; During the last period, The most highlighted achievements during the last period;

  • We at Naba’a are doing all we can to help all affected communities during this extraordinary crisis. Our assistance efforts go to all: Lebanese, refugees and others who were affected without distinction. The devastating impact of the explosion is compounding the challenges currently faced by Lebanese and refugees and adding even more difficulties as families were struggling to survive with the economic crisis that was exacerbated by the impact of COVID-19.
  • 3240 parents and caregivers motivated to be engaged in their children learning and well-being.
  • The psychosocial support sessions focused on groups, as they were formed by referring service applicants who were visited in their homes, and the groups were divided into:
  • The women's groups, which included 75 women, were divided into 5 groups, 10 women within the each group. in these groups it also included 23 men. The following conducted activities were art therapy, psychological drama, psychological and social support activities, and parental therapy. Among 50 women 57 were referred for follow-up by a psychologist as part of individual psychological support sessions for each beneficiary.
  • The division of the groups of children's sessions were according to age (6-14):

-Art therapy sessions for children aged 6 to 10 years

- Psychosocial support "sessions for children "She deals or “I deal with awareness sessions for girls and boys from 11 to 14 years old

- Psychosocial support sessions for all age groups

  • 100 children were targeted, divided into groups according to social and psychological needs. The psychologist referred 30 new children for individual follow-up.
  • It is worthy to note that, two child friendly psychosocial spaces were established at two UNRWA clinics (one in Ein El Helweh and one in Wadi El Zeni), where 2350 children whom their families access UNRWA clinics participated and joined the activities in these spaces.

 

Case Study;

Beneficiary profile

  1. Code: R1
  2. Date of birth: 2003
  3. Nationality: Syrian
  4. Sex: Female
  5. Referred by: Social Worker
  6. Reason for referral: self-harm,   isolation, psychological stress
  7. Risk level: High
  8. Social status; Divorced

 

Notes: The beneficiary is currently married to someone else and has no children.

Economic and living situation of the beneficiary

  1. Work: Unemployed Unstable Stable
  2. Type of work: Stitching

 

  1. Is he/she receiving financial assistance? No
  2. Family income: good average low bad
  3. Nature of the residence: Landlord Rent hosted   tent
  4. Number of rooms: 2
  5. Does anyone else live in the house with the family: The beneficiary and her husband live with her parents and her siblings

Additional Observations on the Living Situation of the Case:

The living and economic situation of the beneficiary is terrible as the family of 8 members live in a house consisting of only 2 rooms which lacks the basic home furnishings.

Summary of the background/history of the beneficiary and the problems suffered from:

After observing the beneficiary’s situation through her participation in awareness sessions, she began talking openly about her situation among the Psycho Social Support group members (group of girls aged 14-20), where she talked about the consequences of early marriage that she faced and suffered from, as she was forcibly ordered by her father to marry a man when she was 15 years old. This early marriage shortly led to family problems and complications including constant insults to her by the husband's parents, leading her to divorce few months after her marriage.

Moreover, after her divorce, she received insults from her own family who considers divorce as a shame and a social defect, where the mother told her, "You are just a divorced girl and so you are with us to serve us."

All that has been addressed and said to her had led to the emergence of high-risk psychological symptoms.

Psychological and Social Symptoms Observed:

- Community isolation (spends days without communicating or meeting with a family or friend)

- Feelings of permanent sadness (most of the time)

- Constant crying

- Fear of facing people

- Loss of self-confidence and loss of trust in people

- Sleep disorders (insomnia)

- Eating disorders (anorexia)

- Nail biting

- Hair cutting (self-torture for revenge)

- Harming her body by cutting off her wrists and arms

Data Collection Method:

Data is collected through the psycho-social support sessions and awareness sessions given, as well as follow-up via the telephone and home visit.

   Intervention and follow-up Methods:

Intervention was conducted in the following ways:

  • Awareness sessions (early marriage, gender-based violence, gender versus sex)
  • Psychosocial support sessions (SHE DEAL), how to deal with risks
  • Art therapy sessions (your strengths and weaknesses, fears and sources of strength, your position in society, expression of emotions)
  • Referral to the psychologist for follow-up

Recommendations:

- Follow-up meetings with the psychologist through individual sessions on a weekly basis

- Continue participating in the sessions that she had begun as a recommendation by the social worker and at the request of the beneficiary herself (awareness sessions, art therapy sessions, social psychological support sessions).

PSS activity
PSS activity
Awareness sessions
Awareness sessions

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She Deals - Psychosocial Activity for adolescents
She Deals - Psychosocial Activity for adolescents

Background during and after the implementation of the project;

Resulted from the previous assessment conducted by Nabaa directly after Beirut explosion, Lebanon needs a reliable crisis management strategy, people must be encouraged to take care of their physical and mental health, and new initiatives are necessary on several levels.

Nabaa started continue its intervention after the explosion where the resulted psychological symptoms were well managed through several appropriate services. Because the traumatic event triggers the symptoms and there is a chance that the symptoms will "turn on" again in the future, Nabaa’s intervention was extended for another short period of time.

Walking into a refugee camp is like walking into a desperately overcrowded slum. The camps are only one kilometer long and accommodate between 25,000 and 37,000 people. Refugees struggle for even the most basic of needs. For electricity, families must string live wires to dozens of other wires, above the tiny walkways around the settlements. Every few weeks, someone gets electrocuted. Many houses are about to collapse, and most people needing care are not able to access hospital treatment. Those most seriously ill die.

Corona virus outbreak was the biggest challenge Nabaa faced due to the strict safety guidelines that were taken and followed while conducting home visits and following up with beneficiaries, as well in implementing activities with groups and municipalities to protect our employees and beneficiaries. Therefore, the sessions were provided remotely, especially after the general lock down.

Based on our follow-up of the targeted beneficiaries, more than 150 home visits were made to the affected families

Naba’a Achievements; During the last period, The most highlighted achievements during the last period;

  • We at Naba’a are doing all we can to help all affected communities during this extraordinary crisis. Our assistance efforts go to all: Lebanese, refugees and others who were affected without distinction. The devastating impact of the explosion is compounding the challenges currently faced by Lebanese and refugees and adding even more difficulties as families were struggling to survive with the economic crisis that was exacerbated by the impact of COVID-19.
  • 1120 parents and caregivers motivated to be engaged in their children learning and well-being.
  • The psychosocial support sessions focused on groups, as they were formed by referring service applicants who were visited in their homes, and the groups were divided into:
  • The women's groups, which included 50 women, were divided into 5 groups, 10 women within the each group. in these groups it also included 10 men. The following conducted activities were art therapy, psychological drama, psychological and social support activities, and parental therapy. Among 50 women 20 were referred for follow-up by a psychologist as part of individual psychological support sessions for each beneficiary.
  • The division of the groups of children's sessions were according to age (6-14):

-Art therapy sessions for children aged 6 to 10 years

- Psychosocial support "sessions for children "She deals or “I deal with awareness sessions for girls and boys from 11 to 14 years old

- Psychosocial support sessions for all age groups

  • 100 children were targeted, divided into groups according to social and psychological needs. The psychologist referred 30 new children for individual follow-up.
  • It is worthy to note that, two child friendly psychosocial spaces were established at two UNRWA clinics (one in Ein El Helweh and one in Wadi El Zeni), where 2350 children whom their families access UNRWA clinics participated and joined the activities in these spaces.

 

Case Study;

The symbol is AAA

Date of birth: 1982

Gender: Female

Nationality: Syrian

- Number of family members: 7 (two girls and three boys)

 

About her life :

The woman lives with her family of 7, two girls and three boys, and her husband in a small rented home. They used to live in Syria but after the war, they left Syria and flee to Lebanon. However, they did not find a decent life where some were bullying them, which made her feel stressed and tense. After they moved from one area to another, they finally settled in Burj Hammoud area, they remained in the area for months before the explosion broke out, as they were financially and psychologically affected. One of her children (10 years) didn’t face any psychological issues until the explosion occurred. After the explosion, he started having hearing problems, fearing everything, and urinary incontinence. This had a negative impact on the mother that led her to cry all day long.

They left the old house due to the destruction took place after Beirut’s blast and moved to a small house. The mother suffers from psychological problems, such as insomnia and eating disorders. Their psychological condition is not stable.

 

Economic situation:

The economic situation is execrable. They can’t afford purchasing the most basic needs for the children, including food, water, and house rent. Their situation is appalling, especially after Port of Beirut explosion. They also do not have any furniture in the house. They sleep on old mattresses on the floor, they do not have an electricity or internet connection because they cannot pay for these supplies, and the power only comes for two hours. So, during the daylight, the family members use a candle instead of power.

 

Health status:

The case lived under pressure due to the traumas that she had experienced. She also has two children who are suffering from urinary incontinence. This leads to an even worse economic situation. As she can’t meet the health needs of diapers or medicine.

 

Social status:

Social status is fine in the family. There are no problems between the mother and her spouse, or even with the neighbors. On the contrary, the neighbors like and defend them, especially when the landlord threatens to evict them. The neighbors didn’t allow such incident to happen, and talked to the owner to give them some time to pay rent.

The issues she suffers from:

Economic problems: expelling the family from the house - their inability to meet the needs of the house, such as food, drink, clothing, or even medicine.

Psychological problems, the most important of which are: insomnia, eating disorders, sadness, anxiety, fear, self-blame.

Intervention:

• Home visits to consolidate the relationship

• Transfer to cash assistance to pay the rent and was assisted with amount of $ 150

• Giving the family food assistance (food parcels – hygiene kits)

• Individual psychological support activities to alleviate the stress

• Psychological support activities to be shared with local community

-      Transfer the case to a psychologist in order to release stress

Recommendations:

-      Follow up on psychological support sessions and awareness sessions

-      Follow-up on psychosocial support activities

-      Follow up with a psychologist

-      Follow up on her children psychologically

-      Home visit

-      Transfer children to psychological support activities

Online Learning support
Online Learning support
Raising Awareness session for women
Raising Awareness session for women
Recreational activity for girls
Recreational activity for girls
Distributing food kits for female headed household
Distributing food kits for female headed household
Psychosocial activity for girls
Psychosocial activity for girls

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Breast Cancer Campaign
Breast Cancer Campaign

Background during and after the implementation of the project;

Disease outbreaks affect women and men differently, and epidemics make existing inequalities for women and girls and discrimination of other marginalized groups such as persons with disabilities and those in extreme poverty, worse. This needs to be considered, given the different impacts surrounding detection and access to treatment for women and men, as well as for their overall wellbeing. For this reason, the emergence of the COVID-19 outbreak has required some emergency response to secure adequate resources and services for women, girls, men, and boys.

The existing social protection system provides for limited specialized services for SGBV survivors and illustrates myriad gaps in sexual and reproductive health services. SBGV incidents as well as episodes of sexual exploitation are believed to be widely underreported, while a quarter of the total incidents reported through protection mechanisms relate to sexual violence (rape or sexual assault) (GBVIMS, 2016). Since 2014, a trend derived from the GBVIMS has indicated an increased risk for girls and women engaging in negative coping mechanisms such as child marriage, possibly linked to denial of livelihood opportunities. According to the GBVIMS, forced marriage has increased to represent 17% of reported GBV incidents in the first quarter of 2017 compared to 12% in 2016. Out of the 17%, the vast majority are early marriage cases (97%). Often, early marriage cases have disclosed the incidents to Case Management service providers after reporting domestic violence. Between other services, in the first quarter of 2017 only 12% of GBV cases received legal services, highlighting the gap in offered aid.

Adolescent girls remain particularly vulnerable, as they are out of school and often exposed to child marriage and exploitation and access to them and in particular those who have been married early is challenging for humanitarian actors. Experience in 2016 has shown that it is essential to work simultaneously with caregivers and adolescents to ensure programmes are adapted to account for their sex- and age-specific vulnerabilities such as early marriage, through tailored curricula. Furthermore, adolescents are considered under-addressed resources that can be empowered as agents of change in the community, and a potential catalyst in promoting stability among different communities. Increased attention will be given to this age group to ensure they have access to adequate services that respond to their vulnerabilities and reduce protection risks caused by unregistered early marriages.

 

Naba’a Achievements; During the last period, The most highlighted achievements during the last period;

A full package of quality services will be offered to young women, girls and GBV survivor (in particular early marriage cases) in Naba’as safe spaces, including counseling and consultation, referral for case management services, sexual and reproductive health and psychosocial support. In terms of sexual and reproductive health, it is known that adolescent girls who got married to older men, frequently suffer power imbalances and are more likely to experience intimate partner violence and forced sexual intercourse. They are also at increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections. Moreover, this demographic is at increased risk of obstructed labor, which may generate fistulas, infant mortality and mother’s suffering. The proposed intervention will increase health education and awareness surrounding symptoms and treatment of reproductive tract infections, will foster family planning, address pre-term birth and increase psychosocial support for beneficiaries in need of SRH services.

Holding awareness campaign about breast cancer

Provision of 300 hygiene kits for the most marginalized refugee families

Providing psychosocial support for 300 women and girls whom are at risk of violence and abuse

Implementing recreational and non-formal activities for 260 dropped out of school children and 350 children inside schools.

 

Case Study;

S.105 lives with her family consisted of 5 members: a husband and four kids in a three-room rented house. The house is not in a good condition to live at with wet walls that are not greased. As well as the house furniture and appliances are ripped off, even the bedroom has only bed sheets on the floor to sleep on. 

She finds herself under extreme psychological pressure, which adversely affects on how to cope with her children who are (16-14-11-9 years old), and its affecting her relationship with the spouse because he recently lost his job due to the national economic crisis, which exacerbates the conflict between them due to expensive basic needs of the whole family like rent, food, and others, as she finds herself unable to meet life’s basic needs, so she is under psychological pressure and anxiety that are also resulted from thoughts about her children’s future. 

 

Economic situation:

Under-privileged: no one has a job and a standard salary at the moment because of the economic crisis, they live in a three- room  house for 500,000 L.L. every month. They receive assistance from local NGOs, but they can’t meet their daily personal needs. 

 

- Health status:

Mother: Suffers from herniated disk 

Father: suffers from high blood pressure and diabetes

Children don't have any health problems 

 

The problems that women suffers from: 

-Poor economic situation that has a negative impact on the entire family's life

- Anxiety resulted from overthinking about her children

- Matrimonial problems

 

- Data collection:

Same case through home visits and individual follow-up

- Intervention:

• Food assistance for the family

• Transfer them into the Financial Assistance Section for support 

• Psychosocial support 

• Awareness sessions for mother on how to deal with her children and manage psychological pressure.

• Integration of children into psychosocial support activities.

-Recommendations:

• Follow-up mother’s case through home visits.

• Transfer mother to psychological follow-up 

• Follow-up with children 

Awareness Rasising
Awareness Rasising
Sensitization Campaign
Sensitization Campaign

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Distributing Dignity kit
Distributing Dignity kit

Background during and after the implementation of the project;

It became clear how fragile the health system was in most countries of the world, including those that were ranked advanced in various fields. The general situation in Lebanon is ominous, with political divisions, economic collapse, the debt payments of foreign debt and the great benefit in the face of the Corona epidemic. Lebanon has recorded 1946 cases of coronavirus (last update 09 July 2020) , which has caused 36 deaths in the country so far. The rates of commitment to prevent mixing and leaving houses vary from region to region where life seems very normal in most areas in terms of large numbers of people in the street and banks! The daily report shared by the Ministry of Health shows that the number of tests achieved until today reaches 10,808 while Lebanon is receiving 4 flights from outside including Lebanese student special cases especially from the countries that categories as epidemic countries. The population of Lebanon is around 5 million including 274.000 Palestinian refugees and around 950.000 Syrian refugees . during the spread of COIV – 19 , the government has taken a safety measures including the block down ,but at the same time serving the Lebanese citizens without including refugees in its social fund that aims to encourage citizens to quarantine at home by them self .

The Syrian refugees are on the Mandate of the UNHCR while the Palestinian refugees are exclusively served by The United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA).

Lebanon hosts the highest number of refugees per capita in the world. UNHCR estimates approximately 1 million and half displaced people in need across the country and having a very strict restrictions on   entering the country since 2015, as well as hundreds of thousands of long-term Palestinian refugees and asylum-seekers.[1]

UN reports state that 80% of the 215,000 Syrian households in Lebanon are existing below the poverty line and more than half live in sub-standard conditions in overcrowded buildings and abandoned warehouses. Amnesty International has reported that Syrian refugees within Lebanon are experiencing an “increasingly hostile and xenophobic environment”.

While According to UNHCR, the number of registered refuges reaches 1500.000 individuals[2] distributed all over Lebanon; 35% are in North Lebanon, 34% in Bekaa, 18% in Beirut and 13 % in southern Lebanon and more than 87000 are on the waiting lists.

Naba’a Achievements; During the last period, The most highlighted achievements during the last period;

-          Providing online psychosocial support for women and girls whom are at risk gender based violence, including, vulnerable Lebanese, Palestinian and Syrian refugees. Whereas, in Ein El helweh camp 555 adolescent girls and 220 women

-          Provision remote GBV specially case management and PSS and establishment of adequate referrals to connect women and girls to appropriate service provision

-          Providing 832 dignity and hygiene kits for the most vulnerable Lebanese, Palestinian and Syrian refugees in south and north Lebanon.

-          Referring women and girls whom are at risk of violence and abuse to psychosocial support, legal aid, etc…

-          Advocacy and lobbying, where the community Leaders and influential persons including religious leaders are aware about the risks of child marriage, and agree that marriage should not be contracted before 18 years in any circumstances.

Case study:

Code: R.J.006

Age: 16 years’ old

Address: Saida – Dalaa’ street

Nationality: Syrian

Grade: Grade eight

Hobbies: Cooking and making sweets

Number of Family members: 5

She’s the second child

A brief about the girls’ life: She lives with her mother, her father and her four brothers, she used to go to school, but she wasn’t interested in education, as she was causing problems with the teachers and the principal as well which led to expulsion from school. She stayed at home for two years, not even studying as she was only interested in cleaning the house and talking to older women which caused a change in her behavior as she became interested in being in a relationship or getting married. Where the 14-year-old girl got engaged to boy who are older than her in 7 years. Also, he does not work and he is not educated, which increases the problems between the girl and her family which caused the girl to cut her hands, and this behavior increased the mother's anxiety. Noteworthy that, the mother attends awareness sessions with us and during our discussion about mental disorders the mother talked about her daughter, which made us intervene immediately to address this issue.  The economic situation: Poor since the father is unemployed and they’re renting the house and her sisters are studying in school, thus the assistance that they are provided with from the United Nations is not enough, which makes the mother to buy foodstuffs in debt.The health situation:

The father suffers from disc disease, and this negatively affects the economic situation, as the mother suffers from pressure and diabetes. As for the girl, she does not suffer from anything.

The girls’ relationship with her father: it is a bad relationship, because the girl doesn’t talk to the father because of his bad behavior towards his children. She says that her father beat her and violates her and that he wants to get rid of her by allowing her to get married to anyone. Therefore, the girl always tries to escape from the house.

 

The girls’ relationship with her mother: it is considered as a good one. The mother always talks with the girl and educates her on how to behave. As she said that, her mother has apologized as they agreed to be friends and the reason behind this action goes beyond her mothers’ participation in the awareness sessions that is being implemented by Nabaa’. Add to this, her mother always tries to know what is happening with her daughter.

 

The girls’ relationship with her siblings: it is a good one. They play together and talk, and they used to go together to school. But once she left the school she felt that she had moved away from her siblings which annoyed her.

The problem the girl is suffering from:

Self-harm / early marriage:

The girl suffers from personality disorders and this is what made her hurt herself as well as thinking about marrying anyone, even if he was unemployed. So the girl suffers from despair and depression, as well as negative thoughts towards herself.

Data collection: the girl herself through conducting an individual hearing sessions / her mother through calling her.

Methods of intervention:

  • Girl's individual hearing sessions.
  • Group hearing sessions (mother - girl)
  • Awareness sessions on early marriage to make her aware of the seriousness of the matter, as well as she was provided with awareness sessions on positive thinking, adolescence and anger management.
  • The registration of the girl in vocational training, where we learned that she loves cooking and making sweets, thus when she registered she became more effective and started to build friendships.

Recommendations:

  • Home visits along with a precaution measures.
  • Follow up on individual hearing sessions.
  • Awareness sessions on life skills / communication / violence / anger management / emotion management

Psychosocial support activities.

[1]https://helprefugees.org/lebanon/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMInc-TgeeY5AIVyLHtCh0qdgA_EAAYAyAAEgIaDPD_BwE

[2] The communicated number from the ministry of foreign affairs is exceeding these figures!

Distributing dignity kit1
Distributing dignity kit1
Distributing kit
Distributing kit

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Organization Information

Developmental Action without Borders/Naba'a

Location: Saida, South - Lebanon
Website:
Project Leader:
Qassem Saad
Saida, South Lebanon
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