Dignity for displaced women and girls in Lebanon

by Developmental Action without Borders/Naba'a
Dignity for displaced women and girls in Lebanon
Dignity for displaced women and girls in Lebanon
Dignity for displaced women and girls in Lebanon
Dignity for displaced women and girls in Lebanon
Dignity for displaced women and girls in Lebanon
Dignity for displaced women and girls in Lebanon
Dignity for displaced women and girls in Lebanon
Dignity for displaced women and girls in Lebanon
Dignity for displaced women and girls in Lebanon
Dignity for displaced women and girls in Lebanon
Recreational activity3
Recreational activity3

Background during and after the implementation of the project;

Big concerns arise about the needs of the refugees coming from Syria and those who are living inside Ein El Helweh Palestinian refugee camp. Since, the situation of the camp is not secure and intense due to the latest clashes occurred among the Palestinian factions. So that, how to meet these needs and for how long. The big concerns are related to the humanitarian, economic and social aspects of the Syrian crises, and focus on the people who displaced from Syria to the neighboring countries. On top, there is the concern of the continuous mobility of displaced people as a consequence of the unrelenting unstable conditions. Regarding the situation of Ein El Helweh camp, during the reporting period, as those who think that the security situation in Ain el Helweh might calm down or stabilize in the near future are wrong. The camp has turned into a place that is open to all possibilities in light of the deteriorating security status, the clashes, the assassinations and the killings between Fatah on one hand and the other Islamic groups on the other hand. “

Syrian refugees have an average monthly income of LBP418,000, with a median of LBP 450,000 a month. There is a significant gender gap, as females earn 40 per cent less than males. The lowest average monthly incomes were found in Akkar and Tripoli; the highest reported in the South. The low wages are somehow complimented with other sources of income; 36 per cent stated they have other sources of income – relying mainly on UNHCR assistance or personal savings. The survey results show that, on average, refugees took 74 days to find work. While it would take 118 days for a refugee to find work in Tripoli and 97 days in Akkar, it takes around 30 days to find work in the South. Personal networking seems to be an important factor in job seeking as 40 per cent of working refugees found work through a Syrian acquaintance and 36 per cent through a Lebanese acquaintance. Poor occupational health and safety takes its toll on Syrian refugees. The data show that many workers suffer from one or more work-related health conditions or are exposed to hazards at the workplace. One out of two workers reported suffering from back or joint pain or severe fatigue; 60 per cent are exposed to dust and fumes, and 49 per cent to extreme cold or heat. A low percentage (12 per cent) of workers have faced some sort of conflict at work, mainly a result of a personal clash; if a conflict took place, most stated they did not take any action. Finally, very few workers (16 per cent) expressed a need for training to build capacity at work, while a larger number (50 per cent) required tools or equipment. Construction and agricultural tools were needed by males whereas females noted the need for sewing, hairdressing, and agricultural equipment. According to various research and official figures, the Syrian crisis has had negative repercussions on the economy and the labour market. Economic growth has slowed, private investments reduced, the trade deficit has expanded, and real estate and tourism – the two most important sectors – have declined. The Syrian crisis and the influx of refugees into poor communities in the peripheral regions of Lebanon have imposed enormous challenges on the country in general and on host communities in particular. The assessment also included focus group meetings with workers and employers in the North and Bekaa, which highlighted a number of repercussions of the continuous inflow of refugees: - Syrian refugees are mainly concentrated in peripheral areas that are historically poor and deprived, thereby exacerbating their already difficult living conditions. - Competition over job opportunities is one of the most, if not the most, urgent challenges facing host communities. The employment situation has worsened with the increase in labour supply. Syrian workers are accepting lower incomes, work for longer hours and without social benefits; this has led to decreasing wages and a reduction of job opportunities.

Naba’a Achievements; During the last period, The most highlighted achievements during the last period;

-          Children and women have been targeted in psychosocial activities as the following, 3051 children (males and females)and 550 parents most of them are women, including, vulnerable Lebanese, Palestinian and Syrian refugees. Whereas, in Borj Al Shamali camp 555 children (males and females and 220 parents including (Lebanese, Syrian Refugees and Palestinian refugees).

-          Fostering and reshape the lives of the most marginalized 120 Lebanese, Syrians and Palestinians young and adolescent girls through empowering the vocational skills of the most marginalized Lebanese girls and enrolling them in the vocational training center to study a vocational profession, this might help in preventing them to get married in the early ages and to think of their future in addition to provide an opportunity for them to find a job in the Lebanese community and to integrate with into it, so that their socio-economic situation will be enhanced as they are able to afford their daily expenses without being a burden on their families.

-          Empowering and enhancing the skills of the girls to be girls advocacy activists within their communities at the local and national levels.

-          Empowerment of women and adolescent girls on protecting themselves from abuse and violence

-          Referring women and girls whom are at risk of violence and abuse to psychosocial support, legal aid, etc..

-          Advocacy and lobbying, where the community Leaders and influential persons including religious leaders are aware about the risks of child marriage, and agree that marriage should not be contracted before 18 years in any circumstances.

-          It is worthy to note that, two child friendly psychosocial spaces were established at two UNRWA clinics (one in Ein El Helweh and one in Wadi El Zeni), where 2350 children whom their families access UNRWA clinics participated and joined the activities in these spaces.

Case study

 

-       Code: EH85 I

-       DOB: 45 years

-       Nationality: PRS  

-       Marital status: divorced

-       Number of children: 3 boys, 1 girl

 

Brief about the case:

The survivor is a woman who got married since she was 17 years old and her marital life was tough as she was subjected to violence and exploitation from her husband, where he used to send her to work at houses in order to bring him money to spend on drinks (as alcohol) and drugs.The survivor gave birth to 3 male children, as there is no difference in their ages except one year between each child. During these stages, the survivor suffered from the worst days, as he used to beat her as we’ve mentioned above until she escaped to Lebanon (Ein El-Hilweh camp) in order to live with her father, but the latter did not bear the children, so he asked his daughter to find another house. Consequently, the survivor rented a room to live with her children and subsist them by working inside the homes. After two years, the husband came to the camp and forced her to live with him, and during this period she was subjected to many insults and violence, where he accused her of cheating on him with a young man in the neighborhood which led her father to hit her in the middle of the street and kicked her out from the neighborhood in which she lives in.   After that, she got pregnant with a baby girl as she didn’t have the will to keep the baby girl alive, since she tried to abort her, but she was not able to do so, which increased the doubts of her husband that the baby girl isn’t his daughter. Where he forced her to do bad things (as she said) In order not to tell people that she is not a decent woman. It is worth mentioning that, the environment in which she lives in rejects these ideas and view that a murder for a reason like this isn’t a wrong behavior. So the survivor feared about her children and herself, which caused her to do many unpleasant things (selling drugs – taking pictures for women without asking them for a permission for the purpose of oppression to get money).

After that, the survivor felt that she could manage everything without her husband, so she asked for a divorce and moved to another neighborhood to live with her children.

Today, the survivor lives alone with her four children (the children work sometimes to transport things or sell tissue-paper and they don’t want to go to school, as for the girl, she is in our kindergarten. We’re following-up the children, where they are accused of theft - selling drugs and sexual harassment, so we follow up with children at social, economic and psychological level.) Now she is not working and remains asleep throughout the day without paying attention to the children. Ø  Her appearance:

Untidy and unclean as it looks tired, there are dark circles under her eyes, as well as her movements indicate that she is using drugs, but she did not admit that.

  • The economic situation:
  • Health status:

poor since the house is rented, and there is no furniture except mattress and a wardrobe for clothes. The house from the inside is not clean and not tidy, as she does not care about the children’s hygiene, nor the house, she said. She does not have the money to care about hygiene.

It’s not good since she always suffers from headache, as for the children, their bodies are weak and her daughter gets sick a lot, since she doesn’t feed them well.

Ø  The social situation: As for the survivor, she has no friends and the neighbors do not enter their homes for fear of her as she became known in the neighborhood she was not a decent woman. On the other hand, for children they have friends where they play with them on the street and in our center.

  • Data Collection:

The survivor itself, children, community worker.

Ø  Intervention:• individual hearings sessions for the survivor• Awareness sessions on the possible risks that she may face • Psychosocial support activities• Individual hearings sessions for children

Ø  Recommendations:Supporting the survivor psychologically and socially through individual hearings sessions - awareness sessions – recreational activities.

Child support: remedial support - psychosocial support activities - awareness sessions - individual listening sessions.

 

 

 

 

A girl open business
A girl open business
Awareness session1
Awareness session1
Vocational training
Vocational training

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Recreational Activity1
Recreational Activity1

Naba’a Achievements; During the last period, Naba’a aimed to improve the situation of the women and girls living in the most marginalized and impoverished communities. Through different interventions Naba’a also works on gathering both (Palestinian refugees women who are already living inside the camps and those who fled from Syria) to raise together their common problems and sufferings, monitoring the violations of their rights in the local community and to reduce the conflict among themselves. By taking a grassroots approach we aimed to help women to become effective actors for social change; giving them the knowledge, skills and confidence to drive social change in their own communities. Therefore, Naba’a intervention is based on two mainstreams;

  • In Ein El Helwe, both children and women have been targeted in psychosocial activities as the following, 3051 children (males and females)and 550 parents most of them are women, including, vulnerable Lebanese, Palestinian and Syrian refugees. Whereas, in Borj Al Shamali camp 555 children (males and females and 220 parents including (Lebanese, Syrian Refugees and Palestinian refugees).
  • It is worthy to note that, two child friendly psychosocial spaces were established at two UNRWA clinics (one in Ein El Helweh and one in Wadi El Zeni), where 2350 children whom their families access UNRWA clinics participated and joined the activities in these spaces.

o   Women and girls access reproductive health services; Nabaa’ targeted 9689 beneficiaries 820 male and 8869 provided two non-consecutive days/ week – clinics in Ein el Helweh and Rashidieh which targeted 1230 female (45 from the age group of 11-18 and 1100 from the age group 19-35 and 85 from the age group of 36-50+) note that, the clinics are managed by a women gynaecologist and a female nurse and the clinic operates one day in the afternoon.

  • Regarding based health awareness, 6 session’s cycles on adolescent health topics have been targeted 2555 adolescent girls from the age group of 11-18 in schools and vocational training centers. Whereas, awareness and counselling sessions have targeted 1500 boys from the age group of 11-18 in schools and vocational training centers by the male health educators.
  • Moreover, monthly reproductive and psychosocial health outreach sessions targeted both men and women and it was conducted by the project’s health professionals, peer to peer team and community mothers and have been participated by 2337 female (60 from the age group of 11-18 and 1497 from the age group of 19-35 and 780 from the age group of 36-50) and by 200 men (10 from the age group of 11-18 and 116 from the age group of 19-35 and 74 from the age group of 36-50+).
  • Finally, two campaigns about breast cancer and cervical cancer have been implemented and targeted 620 males and female (180 from the age group 19-35 and 440 from the age group 36-50+). Knowing that three cases whom are suffering from cancer were discovered during breast and cervical cancer campaigns and they have been referred to specialist. In addition, to that, a large number of men whom are unexpected have been targeted in awareness sessions and the number of women and girls that have been benefited exceeds the actual plan.

Case Study

 

  • Name: AHH
  • DOB: 7/15/2000
  • Residency: Bebneen / Behind Mustafa Mosque
  • Nationality: Lebanese
  • Family Size: 9    

 

  1. Highlight the reason for gathering this case study

ü  Violence in school

ü  engaged at 14 years’ old

ü  Dropout from school

ü  Married

 

  1. What happened?

Since the beginning of the project, by drawing attention to the project's aim and through meetings with girls that we were targeted, she told us that she was engaged, but she liked the idea of the project and asked to participate in it. And one of the objectives of the project is to work with girls who are vulnerable to early marriage.

 

  1. When did it happen (most recent incident if happened more than once)?

After building a good relationship and a trust between the social worker and the girls, the girl told her story to the social worker.

Because of the social norms and traditions of the area that do not allow the girl to get out of the house and mingle during her adolescence, and because of the absence of parents' interest in the feelings of the girl and lack of consciousness of her and guide her to what is best for her in the future, all that encouraged the girl to establish an emotional relationship with one of the young relatives. When parents knew about this relationship for fear of its consequences and from the words of people in society and based on the social norms and traditions, the parents agreed on the girl engagement, and it was as a joy on this step. And she decides her wedding date when she is 17 years’ old

When the engagement took place, she was encouraged to leave school because she was subjected to violence, which affected her degrees in the school, where She was retreating, especially After she failed in the grade 7. she dropped out of school and found no one to encouraged her to continues her education.

 

  1. How has it affected the young person?

Engagement affected the study of the girl in conjunction to subjected to school violence and the lack of parents' interests, which encouraged her to drop out of school from the grade 7. And decided to marry when she becomes 17 years old.

 

  1. Was there any Follow up, and what was the outcome?

After the participation of the girl in the project's activities, after participating in the training (protection - life skills - the risks of early marriage - the importance of education) and through integration into society through the implementation of awareness sessions for her peers and participation in advocacy campaigns that encourage girls to education, which encouraged her To participate in quick professional courses, and the participation of her parents in awareness sessions for parents, which affected the thinking of parents and girls and delay the age of marriage until after 18. the wedding was held at the age of 19 years in agreement with her future husband successfully and joyfully. Even after marriage, she still participates in the project's activities.

 

 

  1. Other comments or details

We Encouraged her to return to school and complete her educational career. And raise her awareness about family planning.

Awareness Rasising
Awareness Rasising
Training for Girls
Training for Girls
Awareness Rasising
Awareness Rasising

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Awareness Rasising
Awareness Rasising

Background during and after the implementation of the project; Many refugees live in camps and un-official gatherings in southern and north Lebanon Palestinian refugee camps and un-official gatherings are one of Lebanon’s most crowded locations. We can’t find any place better than Syria. Syria is our country, our mother. Syria held us close. We lived in dignity.” Fatima has been living in Baraksat gathering a year and a half with her husband and five daughters. Through tears, she explains how they left Syria, everything is destroyed, her life is damaged, they are living in two rooms including the kitchen.

Conditions in the camps are extremely challenging, with no clean water and high rates of violence against women and children. Inhabitants of the camps are in constant danger from exposed live electrical wires, a daily threat as the government refuses to supply electricity to the camps. Many refugees cannot get jobs. Lebanese law does not extend citizenship rights to Palestinians or Syrians living in the country, limiting access to public healthcare and education in addition to jobs and increasing social harassment and stigma for refugees.

Yet, despite high levels of poverty, risk, trauma, and violence, which disproportionately fall on women, it is women who are at the forefront of long-term efforts to build community, create sustainable change, and protect and extend human rights.

Women in the refugee camps have a number of unique needs, and healthcare is foremost among them. Access to basic healthcare is an issue; for example, the Works Agency runs just one health center in the camp, and the generic hygiene kits that are distributed by relief agencies ignore women’s basic needs like sanitary napkins and other needs.

Finally, forced and child marriage is common in refugee camps. According to our grantee partners, some families see marrying off their young daughters as an opportunity to keep their daughters safe, to protect family honor, and to get out of poverty given their limited economic options. They do not see it as a form of violence.

Changing gender roles: Since being displaced and, as refugees in Lebanon, many women are having to take on different responsibilities to those they have had previously, including negotiating and arranging for housing for their families.

Lack of options for refugee women facing violence: In situations of gender-based violence, such as violence in the home, women often do not have any option to leave their home as they usually remain dependent on their family for housing. Lack of rights to their home can also be a result of not being named on any lease agreement or not having any separate income or ability to pay rent.

The most highlighted Achievements during the last period;

-          260 adolescent and women participated in the following awareness sessions;

o   Communication skills sessions:: during brain storming no one of them know what are the main positive ways and mechanisms of communication ,they used violence with their children and family ,ten of them mention that they didn’t know who to communicate in good way ,after brain storming all participants were informed about communication ,its kind ,impact of it on the family and children ,how to communicate with other .

o   Stress management session : during brain storming 3 women mention that they had stress and didn’t know how to deal with it and cannot control their feelings, also 25 women mention that it is unacceptable to visit a psychologist because the community believes that the psychologist is only for the insane.so after brain storming they were informed about stress and its negative impact physically and psychologically ,also they have been taught techniques that help them deal with stress .after session participants were very interested and asked for more sessions

o   Workshops on reproductive health:Three awareness sessions have been conducted under the title of vaginitis, personal hygiene and period.

  • In vaginitis session:we start our session asking participants if they have any idea about vaginitis, many answers suggested which request our preface to categorize these info within 4 categories, then we distribute sticky note randomly asking them to write on it whatever they know about vaginitis and paste it on the flip chart to be discussed with the attendees classifying it in four categories the first one discuss the reasons of infection, second one discuss the signs and symptoms that may experience pre and per infection, the third group discuss the ways of infection transmission, while the fourth category discuss the ways of protection in addition to discussion we add to their knowledge and correct their misconception about certain concepts closing with random recap from the attendees regarding the session material.    
  • In personal hygiene session: we start the session as a completion for the previous sessions (vaginitis and period) by recapping the sessions material with attendees and asking them about the actions that must be taken through these period especially in summer season, many suggested ideas discussed like the frequency of changing pads, wearing cotton under wears instead of polyester, razor after each cycle, using vaginal antiseptic once a week etc…
  • While on the other hand some of the attendees had min-understanding and old mentality about taking shower and going through water bath in these period which request our preface to correct their misconception, aiming to highlight through health reports and documented articles the importance of taking care for personal hygiene as a systemic routinely actions especially during period to reduce the risk of getting infected with any bacteria, finishing with recap about the session material and a clear view about our daily personal hygiene.    
  • In period session: through open discussion with women we asked them if they have any idea about the difference between period and menstrual cycle, where most received answers was no there is no difference , in addition to asking them some anatomical questions regarding the topic like how many uterus does the women have/how many Oocytes does the women have/what's the additional factors that share in lateness of period, after that we begin the session presenting an anatomical poster for the female reproductive system in order to specify the action of each organ, down to explaining the difference between period and menstrual cycle, factors that disturb period in time, and the required personal hygiene within this situation, recapping the session material through post questionnaire include the same suggested questions we asked before to insure the participants knowledge in topic after the session.

Finally, It is worthy to note that, the next period will continue focusing on Self-Hygiene and dignity, where as through the implementation of the sessions, personal hygiene and dignity kits will be distributed for the participants.

 

CASE STUDY

 

 

Code: EH080 IB

Nationality: PRL

Age: 22 years old

Marital status: Divorced

Address: Ein El-Hilweh camp

Number of children: a girl (6 years of age)

 

 

A brief about the case:

The survivor is a 22 year old woman, where she has had many experiences in her life, as she married twice and did not succeed in her marriage. When she was 13 years old she married for the first time and lived with him for 7 years as well as gave birth to her daughter, but she is now deprived of her.

The survivor lived an unstable life as she moved from place to place due to her husband work in many areas which lead to have several problems. She said that her first husband / divorcee is a stingy man who was not paying for the house as he asked her to bring money no matter what. (He was working in the army, which lead his repetitive absence from the house). He used to tell her there was no objection if she brought money from men but she refused to do so and then she went to her parents' house and because of customs and traditions that reside on refusing to divorce a 17 year old girl, her parents were forcing her to stay as she could not reveal what he was doing with her and saying to her until he hits her violently in front of their little daughter. Until she has no patience anymore and she complained in the military court and was divorced from him as they agreed that the girl should stay with her under one condition that she does not get married otherwise the girl will return back to her father. The survivor lived a year with her parents and her child until she met a man who used to be beside her and felt her interest and love. She gets married to him but after spending 8 months she was divorced from him because he is addicted to alcohol and gambling. She could not accept that, especially after her first experience, as she refused to give any justification or any other chance. But after her marriage, her previous husband took her daughter from her and now the girl is living with her father and his wife and goes to her mother one day per week and sometimes he prevents her from meeting her child.

The survivor lives with her parents as she is very angry about life and society, and regarding her psychological state is stated as depressed. She refuses to talk about what stress she is suffering from and what she feels is the rejection of living life as it is, in addition to sadness and anxiety about her daughter.

Intervention method:

After conducting several visits to the survivor and individual sessions for listening and unloading, we have been able to reduce depression, transform negative emotions and refuse living the life to positive emotions in order to think positively to accept conditions and face difficulties. As well as, the survivor was transformed from the state of introversion to the state of integration into society through involving her in vocational training for girls and returns her back to study and to think positively as well as involving her in the targeted group and giving her awareness sessions about stress and how to deal with emotions - how to deal with risks - communication - stress management….

Collecting Information:

- The survivor, her mother and her father.

Recommendations:

- Follow-up the survivor through individual sessions for listening

- Follow up the survivor in the awareness sessions to acquire skills which enable her to cope with life.

- Follow-up the survivor in vocational training

- Trying to help her in getting a job which is convenient for her.

Psycho social Session
Psycho social Session
Hygiene session
Hygiene session
Reproductive health session (Breast Cancer)
Reproductive health session (Breast Cancer)

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Awareness Raising Health Campaign
Awareness Raising Health Campaign

Background during and after the implementation of the project; In a non-camp setting with limited shelter assistance available, the majority of refugees have to pay rent for their housing. Rent continues to be one of the main expenditures of refugees (along with food and healthcare) with the high costs of renewing or regularizing residency visas not even included in the calculations for the Survival Minimum Expenditure Basket for refugees in Lebanon. Finding the money to pay rent is increasingly difficult for refugees in Lebanon, resulting in negative coping mechanisms and the potential for exploitation. With the continued conflict in Syria, safe return is not a viable option and refugees look set to remain displaced and in need of protection and, amongst other things, housing for their families. In accordance with international human rights law, which Lebanon has incorporated into its domestic legislation, all persons have a right to adequate housing, which should include having security of tenure, to guarantee legal protection against forced eviction. In addition, women are entitled to the same rights as men with no discrimination permitted, including for housing, land and property (HLP) rights. Nevertheless, 55% of refugees live in substandard and insecure shelter, there is an increase in the number of informal settlements5 and many refugees are at risk of eviction due to their inability to continue paying rent or for other reasons, often related to so-called security rationale or lack of community acceptance.

Changing gender roles: Since being displaced and, as refugees in Lebanon, many women are having to take on different responsibilities to those they have had previously, including negotiating and arranging for housing for their families.

Lack of options for refugee women facing violence: In situations of gender-based violence, such as violence in the home, women often do not have any option to leave their home as they usually remain dependent on their family for housing. Lack of rights to their home can also be a result of not being named on any lease agreement or not having any separate income or ability to pay rent.

The most highlighted Achievements during the last period;

-          Establishment of girl’s committee participated in developing out an action plan for the advocacy campaign about free and compulsory education for the girls till secondary grades, as they have presented it to the mayors of the municipalities in the north and south Lebanese villages, knowing that, the mayors welcomed the launching of the advocacy campaign and suggested to be partners in this event.

-          250 adolescent girls have been targeted in communication, social skills, and decision making workshops. Where 220 sessions have been implemented in 9 villages in Akkar and Tripoli. Knowing that, the awareness sessions were implemented by the peer to peer girls committee whom were trained on different techniques and methodology, such as (simulation, role play, group discussion , educational games, storytelling and music and art activities as well, for the purpose of providing all of the participants with an equal opportunity to be aware about the main issues related to them such as (risks of early marriage, child abuse, importance of education, etc..)

-          Nabaa' has provided different methodologies in order to raise awareness among local communities by providing not only awareness sessions but also by health services and drop- in clinics as it targeted 986 women and girls where 520 female out of 986 were above 25 years of age, whereas 400 aged between 19 -24 years of age, while 66 aged between 13 – 18 years of age.

-          It is worthy to note that, the women, adolescents and youth acquire certain skills as personal hygiene, communications skills, dealing with children and other life skills in which it is being shown daily with their behaviors'. Moreover, in Saida, Tyr and Mount Lebanon area, 5687 Syrian and 3654 Lebanese have been targeted in SGBV.

-          The number of Syrian beneficiaries that have been sensitized on sexual and gender based violence "SGBV" in Mount Lebanon is estimated 1234, whereas 3445 in Saida and 4398 in Tyre.

-          In addition to that, women and men developed attitudes towards better health choices. On the other hand, Men have been involved in awareness workshops in UNRWA clinics.

-          Hence, they started to take action for early detection, making mammography and Pap smear periodically especially those above 40 years of age. As well as, pregnant women become more aware to importance of following a healthy diet during her pregnancy. A gender balanced approached enabled boys and girls to participate in all activities and express their views on equal basis. The most important aspect is reside on the great need for continuing the work since topics like sexual abuse and early marriage have become issues of a common debates.

 

 

 

CASE STUDY

 

Code: RCF41219

Age: 34

Number of family members: 6

Her arrangement within the family: mother

 

Economic situation:

The economic situation is very bad as the husband does not work and the number of children and their requirements are many which forced her to work in sewing to support her family, but concerning money wise it did not help her to secure the expenses of raw materials. And the husband underwent surgery that prevented him from working and thus she carried the burden of husband and children together.

 

Social situation:

The woman lives with her four children and her husband in a very small house where there is no kind of privacy since it is only a one-room, kitchen and bathroom.

 

The problem in which the women is suffering from: When the lady started the sessions, she was suffering from anxiety and tension, in addition to sorrow and constant crying since there are problems within the family (family husband) as it is worth mentioning that because she lives with them, this influenced her negatively. Hence, she is unable to work because they refused and she could not complete her daily life in a normal way because of the anxiety that she was facing as it prevented her from practicing her life in a normal way.

 

Factors that made the situation more worse:

1 – The bad behavior of the husband's family

2 - The huge responsibility of children as one of them apply to the official certificate but she doesn't own money to help her in studying.

3 – The surgery that prevented her husband from working.

 

Objective of the case study:

  • Helping women ease their feelings about what she is going through
  • Help her to find alternatives to work outside the home to secure her family's requirements
  • Support her psychologically and empower her through workshops that she was participating in.

 

Collecting information:

The information was collected through the woman herself.

Steps to Intervention:

1 - Individual listening sessions.

2 – Her Participation in workshops and awareness sessions for mothers in the center.

3- Her Participation in psychosocial support activities

4 – Her referral to an association which gives sewing classes to help her find work that believes in her strength.

Results obtained so far:

1 - A clear difference in the way she is living with regard of how to take care of her children.

2. She became more able to deal with the problems she is facing, as it is worth mentioning that whenever she had a problem she started to solve it by crying.

3. Herself confidence has increased, where she used to look at herself and say she doesn't deserve anything and life as well.

4. The self-care program we used to apply in the listening sessions helped her to make her lifestyle healthier and psychologically advanced.

Recommendations:

- Work to find a work of good financial benefit in which she can depend on to support her family in a good way.

Women Day
Women Day
Women Activity
Women Activity
Girls Activity
Girls Activity
Health Day
Health Day

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Girls Campaign
Girls Campaign

Background during and after the implementation of the project; Since 2011, there have been an estimated one million and a half Syrian refugees in Lebanon. In times of conflict, women’s health disproportionately suffers, and Syrian women are no different. A vast majority of Syrian refugees are hosted in Lebanon, while Lebanon has approached the refugee crisis in a many different way, similar women’s health problems have arisen, and Syrian women’s health and reproductive health has been compromised. Syrian women experience sexual harassment, rape, violence, early age at marriage, early age at pregnancy and complications during pregnancy. Because Syrian refugees reside in multiple countries, international and diplomatic efforts are required to address their health and well-being. The continued presence of Syrian refugee women’s health disparities requires action to remedy the disparities. Creating health programs and policies for Syrian women refugees’ health requires operating at the intersection of diversity and diplomacy and is essential to post-conflict reconstruction and recovery.

In situations of gender-based violence, such as violence in the home, women often do not have any option to leave their home as they usually remain dependent on their family for housing. Lack of rights to their home can also be a result of not being named on any lease agreement or not having any separate income or ability to pay rent

Naba’a Achievements; During the last period, Naba’a aimed to foster the reshaping of the lives of the women inside Palestinian refugee camps. Through tackling the grassroots of the violation in rights among host and hosted families of Palestinian refugees women aged 16-35. Through different interventions Naba’a also works on gathering both (Palestinian refugees women who are already living inside the camps and those who fled from Syria) to raise together their common problems and sufferings, monitoring the violations of their rights in the local community and to reduce the conflict among themselves. By taking a grassroots approach we aimed to help women to become effective actors for social change; giving them the knowledge, skills and confidence to drive social change in their own communities. Therefore, Naba’a intervention is based on two mainstreams;

-          The first one is on improving the status of women as to ensure that they are treated equally within their community and they are aware about their rights and how to protect themselves from abuse. This will be achieved through;

  • Raising awareness 400 women (200/camp) on CEDWA and how to protect themselves from abuse inside Palestinian refugees living inside Rashydieh and Ein El Helweh camps and PRS who fled from Syria.
  • Psycho-social support and individual listening sessions for those who are exposed to violence and abuse. Through the individual sessions, the main common problems and sufferings are raised and tried to be treated, in addition to conduct anger management healing strategies with the displaced women.
  • Outreach activities aiming to give them opportunity to express themselves, reduce the gap among both beneficiaries, overcome their problems and reduce stress and pressure.

 

-          The second stream is focusing on strengthening the women’s capacity inside their communities (both displaced women and women who are living inside the camps) where they become able to address their common problems (bad economical situation, women violated rights such as participation and protection) and needs and uphold them to higher level of decision making. At this stage they will be the focal with the displaced Palestinian committee, so through empowering their capacities and skills in leader ship and planning and participating with the active members and duty bearer, they can reshape the lives of the women inside Palestinian refugee camps, and induce social change through social activism where they will mobilize other women and induce them to participate actively.

 

 

CASE STUDY

 

Case Study

Code: EH080 IB

Nationality: PRL

Age: 22 years old

Social status: Divorced

Address: Ain El-Hilweh camp

Number of children: a girl (6 years)

 

About Status:

The Case is a 22-years-old woman who has had many experiences in her life. She married twice and did not succeed in her marriage life, when she married the first time she was 13 years old as she lived with him for 7 years, where she gave birth to her child, who is now deprived from her. The case lives an unstable life as she moved from one place to another because of her husband's work in many areas, which caused to them many problems, according to what she said is that her ex-husband is a miserly person. He used to work as a Soldier which led his absence from the house and he was saying to his wife that there is no objection if she brought money in an unethical way but she refused and went to her parent’s home. Because of the customs and traditions they refuse to divorce a girl of 17 years as they forced her to stay and she didn’t tell anything regarding what he was doing to her, until she became abused from her husband in front of their little daughter.
She submit a complaint to the Military Court and was divorced from him as she agreed to keep the girl with her on the condition that she does not get married and if she will marry, the child will turn to her father. The women live year with her parents and her child until she met a man who approached her and felt her interest and love and was married to him, She was divorced from him because he was addicted to alcoholand gambling and couldnot accept it, especially after the first experience that she had refused to give any justification and any other chance. But after her marriage, her daughter turned to her father and wife as well as she goes to her mother house on a weekly basis. And sometimes prevents from meeting her.

 The women lives with her parents and she was angry about her life and society, as she suffers from depression and She refuses to talk about her stress and what she feels is the rejection of life, sadness and anxiety for her daughter.

Intervention:

After several visits and individual sessions of listening and unloading, we were able to alleviate depression and transform negative feelings and reject life to accept the conditions and face difficulties and think positively, convert her from the state of introversion to integration into society through the introduction of vocational training for girls and return to study and optimism in the future as introduced in the team Targets and give them awareness workshops about stress and how to deal with emotions - how to deal with the risks - communication – and how to control yourself.

 

Information collection:

- Case

- Social workers

Recommendations:

- Follow-up of the Case through individual hearings.

- Follow up the Case through awareness sessions.

- Follow-up of case in vocational training.

- Trying to help her get a job that suits her.

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Organization Information

Developmental Action without Borders/Naba'a

Location: Saida, South - Lebanon
Website:
Project Leader:
Qassem Saad
Saida, South Lebanon
$10,121 raised of $10,000 goal
 
72 donations
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