Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless

by Feeding Pets of the Homeless
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Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Emergency Veterinary Care for Pets of the Homeless
Roxi
Roxi

David has been homeless for about a year now and has been living in his vehicle with his one-year-old chihuahua named Roxi. He does not receive much help from organizations but he does receive his mail at the Arcata House Partnership Administration office.

David heard of Feeding Pets of the Homeless through a friend we had previously helped. The pair live in a town called Arcata in California.   

They were taking a walk down a familiar path in the woods.  David had realized that this area had dry grass and many fox tails laying around, which he didn’t get too bothered with since he knew Roxi was smart enough to not go near foxtails.

Upon the intake interview it was discovered that Roxi did sniff something from the ground the day they went for a walk. Roxi had been showing symptoms such as sneezing dramatically and breathing as if she had asthma. David thinks that there is something in her right nostril that is making her sneeze uncontrollably and have difficulty breathing correctly.

Roxi’s case manager was able to get an exam approved and pre-authorized with one of our network hospitals in Eureka which is a neighboring city of Arcata.

Once the exam was performed, the doctor discovered that Roxi indeed had a foxtail in her nose which caused her to sneeze so much.  Roxi was given anesthesia and surgery was performed to remove the foxtail.  Roxi is doing so much better and is no longer sneezing or having troubles breathing.

David was so thankful for Feeding Pets of the Homeless and those who donate to help them with their pets care. Feeding Pets of the Homeless provided assistance in the amount of $304 (after a hospital discount) towards Roxi’s care.

This case illustrates that even something as small as a foxtail can be expensive.  When you are homeless and your pet is injured or ill and you not have resources to get the help for your pet it is stressful for both pet and owner.   

Many of our clients call with anguish in the voice or are sobbing because they can’t stop the suffering of their beloved pet.

Your donations help dogs like Roxi and homeless like David. 

Every day we get calls asking for help... during 2021 staff called or took over 11,700 calls.   Today we have over 135 cases that are pending.  Pending because we need to verify homelessness, or we are waiting for an appointment at a hospital.   Even with over 1,260 hospitals in our network we sometimes have to find new ones in cities that we have none. 

I am reaching out to you to ask that if you know or have a veterinary hospital for your own pet, please share our mission with your veterinarian.

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Kelly
Kelly

Feeding Pets of the Homeless® teamed up with U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development- VA Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) to provide the pets of verified veterans in the program veterinary care.  The program is “Veteran Pet Support.”

The HUD-VASH program combines the HUD housing vouchers with the supportive services provided by the VA to help Veterans who are homeless, and their families find and sustain permanent housing. The program targets the chronically homeless veterans who are most vulnerable and often have severe mental or physical health problems and limited access to other social supports.

“We need to work to better help those who have served our country and that includes their animal companions who provide them with much needed comfort and security.” Genevieve Frederick, founder and president of Feeding Pets of the Homeless, said. “We are proud that we can help our veterans and their pets in their time of need,” said Genevieve Frederick.  She went on the say that this program is personal because her immediate family has many veterans in it that served in WWII, Korea, and Viet Nam serving in the Army and Navy.   I am honored that our organization can work with HUD-VASH to provide resources to these veterans who need our help.”

“We understand the unconditional love, comfort and security pets can bring a homeless person and we do our best to keep these pets and their human companions together,” Frederick said. “We want to help these veterans maintain this bond with their animal companions as long as possible.” 

This year we have helped over 76 veterans.  Some were on the streets, some were in this special program for homeless veterans.

Randy called Feeding Pets of the Homeless® when his 11-year old unaltered female Spaniel, Kelly was not eating and having troubles getting up. He searched and found us through Google.   Randy is a Veteran participating in the HUD-VASH program, and stays in a motel that is paid for by the Volunteers of America.  He is on a list to get into housing assistance with HUD-VASH.  Randy is over 65, disabled, receives SSI benefits and has been homeless for the past 6 years.  He has a car.  We verified his homelessness with his HUD-VASH social worker.  We approved an exam at on of your 1,200 veterinary hospitals in California.

After Kelly’s exam, the veterinarian technician called our Case Manager and reported that Kelly had a 106 degree fever.  The vet recommended bloodwork, to get her fever under control with hospitalization, iv fluids, medications as well as x-rays.  Kelly had mammary masses all over and they feared it could be pyometra.  They recommended removal of the mammary masses.

Surgery was performed the next day and the charges came to $2,760.  This included: an emergency examination, in-house CBC/Chem panel, 4-view x-rays, iv catheter and fluids, and hospitalization.  Surgery included: pre-anesthesia medications, anesthesia, and monitoring, mammary gland tumor surgical removal, spay, injections, biopsy, hazardous waste, an e-collar and four medications. Feeding Pets of the Homeless provided $2,000 in financial assistance.  A client in the lobby contributed $200 and another organization pledged $100.  The hospital planned on writing off the difference of $460.   Kelly went home with Randy, is doing well and expected to make a full recovery.

It is my Holiday wish that you can support this vital program.

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Tyson
Tyson

Over 62% of homeless reaching out to Feeding Pets of the Homeless for veterinary care are women.  Kayla is one of the over 5,000 homeless in Southern Nevada. 

Kayla called Feeding Pets of the Homeless seeking assistance for veterinary services for her three-year-old male neutered blue nose Pitbull, Tyson.  

During the intake it was discovered that she has lived in a tent for the last two years in Las Vegas, NV.   She told us that the dog was a puppy that someone had given her.  She receives food stamps but does not have transportation.  

One of the many other animal welfare organizations that we partner with referred her to us when they could not treat Tyson.  They were able to verify that Kayla and Tyson are homeless.      

Tyson was showing symptoms of an ear infection and had a blackish/red build up in his left ear. He was shaking his head constantly, and also had a fever.

Tyson’s case manager was able to get an exam approved and pre-authorized at one of the 1,200 hospitals across the county and a new one in Las Vegas.   

Tyson did in fact, have an ear infection, fortunately not a severe one. The doctor was able to do a cytology and provided meds and an ear cleaner to keep his ear from getting infected all over again. A re-check was performed 10 days after the first examination.

Feeding Pets of the Homeless paid at time of service $200 towards the care of Tyson. The hospital did not charge for the exam and provided vaccinations as well.  Tyson is doing so much better now all thanks to Feeding Pets of the Homeless and those who help with their donations!

The Dave & Cheryl Duffield Foundation will double your impact! Donations up to a collective $75,000 will be matched through the end of the year! The faster we reach our goal the quicker we can help more pets belonging to the homeless.
http://petsofthehomeless.org/2021-matching  Make you donation today!

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Hunter
Hunter

This is Hunter; he belongs to a homeless woman that has lived in her car in San Diego, CA for the last three years.   Hunter is a neutered 12 year old male.  She gets food for her and Hunter at food banks in the area. Many homeless women have dogs like Hunter as protection.  The streets and even living in a car can be dangerous.

Feeding Pets of the Homeless provided treatment for Hunter in 2020 and again in 2021.   Treatment for digesting a chicken bone and plastic.  Then in August this year, a severe skin infection along with lesion and an infection on the scrotal area.  Treatment costs of $1,013 were paid directly to the hospital, money that his owner did not have.

Since the start of the Pandemic, Feeding Pets of the Homeless, as well as other nonprofits, have experienced many unforeseen changes for which we have done our very best to adapt. 

We have seen a significant growth in people seeking veterinary care for their pets, people seeking pet food, people seeking a homeless shelter that will allow pets.  Adding to the problem is veterinary hospitals are finding their schedules booked out for weeks to months at a time.  Most emergency hospitals have an average wait time of 4-8 hours and some having to turn patients away.  They are experiencing a shortage of staff like many other businesses.  

Like our veterinary colleagues, giving all our compassion day in and day out only to see some cases not have a favorable conclusion, or having to turn away people that cannot verify they are homeless can be draining.  Enduring those frustrations for the callers as well as my staff is stressful.

Cold weather will increase callers asking about a homeless or a warming shelter that will allow their pets.  Added to that, natural disasters and with evictions on the horizon, we are worried we will not be able to keep up and many pets owned by the homeless will go without treatment for an illness or an injury.

At Feeding Pets of the Homeless, we have had to add an answering service to take the large amount of calls we receive 24/7.

We appreciate your continued support.

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Bubba
Bubba

According to the National Alliance to End Homelessness there are over 37,252 veterans experiencing homelessness on a single night in January 2020.   What you may not know is that nearly a quarter of them have pets, or more accurately, companions, friends, protectors and providers of unconditional love. 

In a 2019 report by the VA, approximately 17 U.S. veterans commit suicide every day as PTSD and other mental illnesses, disease and harsh conditions take their toll.  The emotional nourishment these animals provide in keeping their humans comforted, is beyond calculation.  The care the homeless give to their animals is astonishing, given their resources.  In almost all cases of relations between a homeless person and an animal, the animal eats first.  However, like the homeless veterans themselves, these pets need food, medical care and other basics, as they are susceptible to the same hunger and medical conditions that household pets are.  They are not sick animals; they just need a little help to do their job.

These animals of the homeless – dogs, cats and other creatures – are noble, loyal, loving protective and committed to service, just like the veteran men and women whose problems they help heal as best they can.

That is why we have incorporated a new program called “Veteran Pet Support” for homeless veterans and veterans in the HUD-VASH program.  Paying for veterinary care when their pets are injured or ill. 

Bubba Davis

Bubba and his owner have been living in an RV in Southern California with no hook ups for the past five years.  Ms. Davis is disabled and receives SSDI.    She reached out to Feeding Pets of the Homeless for her 9-year-old neutered pit bull Bubba.  Bubba had a severe ear hematoma. 

An intake interview was completed and homeless verification was provided.

An exam was approved at one of our 1,140 network hospitals. Following the exam, it was determined that Bubba would need surgery to fix the ear hematoma.  Surgery was completed and vaccinations were updated as well.  

Feeding Pets of the Homeless contributed $2,000 towards Bubbas care and a discount of $ 1,418 was given to cover the total cost.

Bubba’s Mom called the case manager a few days after surgery and reported that he was doing wonderful in his recovery.  

Since we do not receive government funding, we reply on public support to deliver ermergency veterinary services. 

Feeding Pets of the Homeless (aka) Pets of the Homeless became a recognized 501 (c) (3) nonprofit organization registered with the State of Nevada in 2008.  Charity Navigator rated us 100 of 100 and GuideStar rated us a “Platinum.”  We are registered as a charity with all States with registration requirements.

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Organization Information

Feeding Pets of the Homeless

Location: Carson City, NV - USA
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @petsofhomeless
Project Leader:
Genevieve Frederick
Founder
Carson City, NV United States
$407,227 raised of $500,000 goal
 
8,658 donations
$92,773 to go
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