Coral Reef Restoration & Conservation In Mexico

by GVI Charitable Programs
Coral Reef Restoration & Conservation In Mexico
Coral Reef Restoration & Conservation In Mexico
Coral Reef Restoration & Conservation In Mexico
Coral Reef Restoration & Conservation In Mexico
Coral Reef Restoration & Conservation In Mexico
Coral Reef Restoration & Conservation In Mexico
Coral Reef Restoration & Conservation In Mexico
Coral Reef Restoration & Conservation In Mexico
Coral Reef Restoration & Conservation In Mexico
Coral Reef Restoration & Conservation In Mexico
Coral Reef Restoration & Conservation In Mexico
Coral Reef Restoration & Conservation In Mexico
Coral Reef Restoration & Conservation In Mexico
Coral Reef Restoration & Conservation In Mexico
Coral Reef Restoration & Conservation In Mexico
Coral Reef Restoration & Conservation In Mexico

Thank you for your continued support of our marine conservation project.

One of the key projects we work on is coral restoration and we provide support at the INAPESCA's coral lab up to 3 times a week.  We help with the micro-fragmentation process, preparing the fragments to be placed in the tanks. Such delicate work!

Needless to say, we love our turtles and as we head into nesting and hatching season, we work on cleaning the beach and removing obstacles to help ensure the turtles have a safe passage to lay their eggs.

Did you know that sand castles/pits dug on the beach could potentially hinder or even trap turtle hatchlings? You too can do your part to help avoid that after a day at the beach!

At the heart of what we do as ocean protectors, we strive to educate people from all over the world, collaborate with local communities, and work with governmental organisations on various conservation projects to the best of our ability. It is our mantra to support the UN sustainable development goal "Life Below Water" to promote the sustainable use of marine resources for sustainable development.

World Reef Day was on June 1st.  We celebrated the importance of coral reefs and raised awareness of the impact of human activities that can damage or kill them. Coral reefs are incredibly sensitive to temperature, water quality and sunlight availability.  Pollution from chemical and nutrient runoff and ocean acidification brings about a decrease in water quality. Tourism activities introduce the use of sunscreen and can stir up sediment, which decreases the amount of sunlight and can smother the reef.

Education is a key to change and the more we can highlight the issues affecting coral reefs and work towards monitoring and restoring the reef, we can contribute to a positive impact.

We love our reefs and work hard every day to protect them and we hope you will join in too!

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Coral Relocation
Coral Relocation

In 2022 we already started training new participants in reef monitoring techniques following the Atlantic and Gulf Rapid Reef Assessment Protocol.  Getting them to fine tune their diving skills and learning about the reef ecosystem, the interaction with other ecosystems and the different species that inhibit them. We have already collected data on the health of the reef and shared it with our differente partners so they can use it to determine proper paths to follow for the conservation of the reef.

With four years already under the bridge since the start of the coral restoration project,  doing coral cloning through coral fragmentation and assisted fertilization. So far we have only been able to reach 35% advance on our objectives. Having generated and relocated in the reef 79.5 thousand coral so far, one third of our total objective of 265 thousand corals by 2022.  A big challenge but something we are sure can be done, needs to be done to be able to give another huge step in the conservation of the magnificent coral reef ecosystems.  We are proud to announce that through your generous donations we are currently in the process of expanding our Coral Lab to increase the scope and reach of our work. As always with the huge help from your support, GRACIAS!!!!!!

Fragment Maintenance
Fragment Maintenance
Coral Monitoring
Coral Monitoring
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In support of our coral restoration program, we have spent the last 3-4 months working on a marine aquaculture program focused on incrementing the presence of the Maguimithrax spinosissimus, (Caribbean King Crab), in the coral reef, specifically in the sites where coral restoration activities are being carried out. These crabs are herbivores and love macroalgae: the same macroalgae that are smothering the corals by overgrowth. The per capita grazing rate of this species exceeds those of most herbivorous fish. Getting more of these crabs into the coral reef ecosystem will make a huge difference to the success of the coral restoration project.

So far this year, we have been reef monitoring following the Atlantic and Gulf Rapid Reef Assessment Protocol. We have already collected data on the health of the reef and shared it with several of our partners so that they can use the data to aid decision making re the regulations and policies for the management of the reef areas and the conservation of the reef.

On coral restoration projects, and coral cloning through fragmentation and assisted fertilization, we have so far achieved 35% advancement on our objectives. We have generated and relocated 79.5 thousand coral in the reef so far, which is equivalent to one third of our total objective of 265 thousand corals by 2022.  Meeting our goal is a substantial challenge after the disruptions of COVID-19, that contnue to impact upon our ability to conduct our work but, something that needs to be done to be able to advance forward in the conservation of the magnificent coral reef ecosystems. 

Thank you once again for your support, our work so far, and in the future, is only possible due to the huge support from people like you, GRACIAS!!!!!!

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In support of our coral restoration program, we have started a new marine aquaculture program focused on incrementing the presence of the Maguimithrax spinosissimus, (Caribbean King Crab), in the coral reef, specifically in the sites where coral restoration activities are being carried out. These crabs are herbivores and love macroalgae: the same macroalgae that are smothering the corals by overgrowth. The per capita grazing rate of this species exceeds those of most herbivorous fish. Getting more of these crabs into the coral reef ecosystem will make a huge difference to the success of the coral restoration project.

So far this year, we have been reef monitoring following the Atlantic and Gulf Rapid Reef Assessment Protocol. We have already collected data on the health of the reef and shared it with several of our partners so that they can use the data to aid decision making re the regulations and policies for the management of the reef areas and the conservation of the reef.

On coral restoration projects, and coral cloning through fragmentation and assisted fertilization, we have so far achieved 35% advancement on our objectives. We have generated and relocated 79.5 thousand coral in the reef so far, which is equivalent to one third of our total objective of 265 thousand corals by 2022.  Meeting our goal is a substantial challenge after the disruptions of COVID-19, that contnue to impact upon our ability to conduct our work but, something that needs to be done to be able to advance forward in the conservation of the magnificent coral reef ecosystems. 

In support of GVI Charitable Programs "The 6th Mass Extinction" campaign, we will be joining nearly 500 other poeple around the world to help highlight the current conservation and climate crisis we all face, actions we can all take to help reduce the negative impact we are all having on the planet, and to help raise funds to support critical consrvation and climate actioon projects. To support or donate to the campaign, please see link below. 

Thank you once again for your support, our work so far, and in the future, is only possible due to the huge support from people like you, GRACIAS!!!!!!

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Organization Information

GVI Charitable Programs

Location: The Woodlands, TX - USA
Website:
Project Leader:
Stephanie toe Water
The Woodlands, TX United States
$3,576 raised of $7,500 goal
 
57 donations
$3,924 to go
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