Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya

by Maasai Girls Education Fund
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
Empower Maasai Girls in Kenya
MGEF Students Are Family
MGEF Students Are Family

Dear friends,

As the world continues to battle COVID-19, MGEF is very proud of our staff, volunteers and, of course, our steadfast scholars. They continue to show courage and resilience as they navigate through the pandemic.  This week is the opening of Term 2 of 2021.  The staff is busy receiving students as they drop by to pick up their supplies for the term.  To keep this a safe procedure, much is done outside and all are required to wear masks.  MGEF currently has 137 active students – 52 primary, 45 secondary, 36 post-secondary and five pending post-secondary awaiting acceptance to schools.   

Due to the lockdowns and school schedule changes, primary and secondary graduating students took their Kenya Certificate of Primary or Secondary Education exams (KCPE or KCSE, respectively) in the spring of 2021 instead of the fall of 2020.  This spring, despite COVID-19, MGEF had four primary, five secondary and five post-secondary graduations.  Though we could not meet in person to celebrate, we are very proud of all of our graduates.  Whether from primary, secondary or post-secondary schools, each graduation is a stepping stone to the next hurdle.   

I thought it would be nice to share the successes of some of our graduates.  I would like to tell the stories of Rebecca who recently graduated from secondary school, and Faith who recently graduated from primary school.  

Rebecca was an ambitious little girl with big dreams.  She was born in a typical Maasai manyatta. Her father had four wives and 31 children.  Her mother was the third of the four wives and had nine children. Rebecca was a happy young child as the family had plenty of livestock and food.  She went to a local primary school and felt she had a bright future.  Then in 2000 the drought hit and life changed as they lost their livestock. Rebecca’s father began to marry off his daughters for cows and goats to build back his wealth.  Unfortunately, the droughts continued and in 2010 Rebecca ran away from home because she knew she would soon be married off.  MGEF accepted her into its Scholarship Program that year.  A year later, during a holiday break, succumbing to traditional beliefs and peer pressure, Rebecca got pregnant.  Her father then married her off to a man who was abusive and with whom she would have two children.  Rebecca knew that the only hope for her and her children was to escape the violence and return to school.  In 2015, she left her abusive husband and went home to her mother.  Her mother said she would care for her two children and Rebecca asked MGEF to please help her return to her education.  MGEF understands the pressures a Maasai girl encounters and felt Rebecca deserved another chance.  Once a part of the MGEF family, you are always a part of the MGEF family.  In January of 2016, Rebecca returned to school for Class 8 (8th grade) and was determined to keep on a steady path towards achieving her dreams of an education and independence.  

Rebecca graduated from secondary school this past spring.  MGEF is incredibly proud of her as she was so close to becoming a victim of abuse for her entire life.  She wanted a better life for herself and, more importantly, for her children.  She knew the only path to a brighter future was with an education.  She has applied to post-secondary schools to become a kindergarten teacher.  

Faith comes from a polygamist family of two wives and nine children.  Faith’s father and mother are illiterate with no jobs or livestock.  The family was struggling to put food on the table.  In early 2016, after two of her sisters were married off, Faith decided to run away, not only to avoid an early marriage, but also because she was hungry.  She eventually ended up at the Kajiado Adventist school and rescue center. MGEF was informed of her situation and the staff had her fill out an MGEF Scholarship application.  In May 2016, Faith was accepted into our Scholarship Program.

Faith is the first girl in her family to graduate from primary school.  She is now in Form 1 (9th grade) at a good secondary school.  She dreams of becoming a teacher.  To watch the transformation of Faith from a very scared and meek girl who rarely smiled, to a confident girl, quick to laugh and excited to learn, is hard to put into words.  

COVID-19 has added to the already severe financial hardships for Maasai families.  Due to this and the required periodic school closures, there has been a huge resurgence in historical customs that are damaging to Maasai girls, including forced marriage, female genital cutting (FGC) and domestic violence.  The need to educate girls has never been more critical.  The MGEF-Kajiado office is visited daily by girls like Rebecca and Faith trying to escape early marriage, FGC, violent situations and poverty.  We were able to add 10 new students to our roster for Term 1 this year.  Yet there are so many more desperate to change their lives with an education. 

We thank our supporters who have made the stories of Faith and Rebecca, and all of our students, a reality at MGEF.  

MGEF Scholar Rebecca
MGEF Scholar Rebecca
MGEF Scholar Faith
MGEF Scholar Faith
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Lucy And Nancy Receive The DIAR Award
Lucy And Nancy Receive The DIAR Award

Dear Friends, 

Through the pandemic, MGEF continues to celebrate every success even as we power through setbacks.  MGEF-Kajiado was deeply honored to receive the 2021 Best NGO on Gender Equality Award at the National Diversity and Inclusion Awards & Recognition ceremony in Nairobi, Kenya in March. Lucy, MGEF-Kajiado Managing Director, and Alumna Nancy (MGEF’s first lawyer!) were proud and excited to represent MGEF at the ceremony.  Lucy, the MGEF-Kajiado staff, board members and alumnae work tirelessly to help Maasai girls and women reach their potential through education. We value and applaud each of our scholarship recipients, whether she is a primary school student who is the only literate person in her village or one of the very few Maasai female doctors or lawyers in the country. With your help and despite a very difficult year, MGEF and our graduates are still making a difference as we work towards gender equality and combat poverty.

SCHOLARSHIP STUDENT UPDATE

As stated in our previous update letter, the Kenyan government condensed and rearranged school terms, aiming to return to a normal schedule by January 2023.  We were happy when the students were able to return in May 2021, for Term 3 of 2020.  It was touch and go as Kenya was forced to go into a second lockdown due to a surge of COVID19 cases in late March.  Fortunately, the lockdown was lifted in time to return to school.   

To accommodate graduating students from Class 8 and Form 4, the break between Term 2 and Term 3 was seven weeks long in order to allow the Kenya Certificate for Primary Education (KCPE) and the Kenya Certificate Secondary Education (KCSE) exams to be administered and evaluated.  This break coincided with the second lockdown, but the Ministry of Education decided to move ahead with the exams with strict COVID19 guidelines.  We are very proud of the four primary and five secondary graduating students who persevered though this challenging time in order to accomplish their goals.  

If all goes as planned, Term 1 of 2021 will begin in late July.  Due to the overwhelming number of desperate girls and parents applying for scholarships, MGEF decided to take eight new students for Term 1.  One from each of the seven divisions of Kajiado County and one from the many applications submitted directly the MGEF-Kajiado office.  This will bring the roster for 2021 to 142 active students - 52 primary, 49 secondary, 33 post-secondary and eight pending post-secondary who are awaiting acceptance to institutions of higher learning.  

It has been a tough 14 months for students throughout the world as we all combat COVID19.  The lockdowns are particularly threatening to Maasai girls in Kenya.  As families struggle with little to no income, often the old traditions of marrying your daughter off for a dowry becomes a financial solution.  Not only does the family receive cows, goats or money, but it is also one less mouth to feed.  The number of girls in Kenya who became victims of unwanted marriages increased substantially during the pandemic.  

Recently, Kajiado-MGEF’s Managing Director received a call from one of our secondary students stating that her father would have company in a couple of days.  She feared he was planning to marry her off.  Lucy and Abigael, MGEF-Kajiado Program Manager, immediately went to her home.  When they arrived, her father was not present, but our staff questioned the student’s mother and stepmother who both confirmed that he was indeed arranging her marriage.  

The father arrived home and was questioned about his intentions.  He became angry and chased our staff off of his land and threatened that he was going to beat his wives.  Lucy went back to the office and immediately contacted the chief in the area who said he would visit and stop the father from marrying off his young daughter.  Lucy also contacted many teachers who came to our student’s aid. The next day, the chief visited the father and warned him that his plan is illegal and he will be monitoring the situation.  The father finally claimed he would not marry her off and let her continue her education.  Each day, this terrible plot plays out among Maasai girls throughout Kenya, but most of the time without the positive ending achieved for our student. 

Despite the two lockdowns, five of MGEF’s post-secondary students were able to finish classes and complete exams in order to graduate.  Thanks to the generosity of our donors, many received laptops and internet access allowing them to keep up with their studies.  

In the event of another extended lockdown, Kenya is not equipped to provide online classes for primary and secondary students.  It would be a mammoth undertaking for the government to provide tablets or laptops to all students.  Moreover, many rural areas still do not have electricity, much less access to the internet.  A longer lockdown will require the government to rearrange school terms once again to slowly return to their traditional school year schedule.  Unfortunately, education has suffered in some form or another throughout the world due to COVID19.  

WOMEN’S BUSINESS TRAINING UPDATE

Since 2013, MGEF has conducted 10 Women’s Business Training (WBT) workshops with 30 business women participating in each workshop.  Of the 300 women who have completed our WBT workshops, 279 were still in business prior to the pandemic.  In early March, the MGEF-Kajiado staff began contacting and preparing to visit each of the 10 workshop cohorts to assess the impacts of the lockdown and to see if they needed help rebuilding their small businesses.  The first visits were scheduled for early April, but these plans were thwarted by the second lockdown.  We were disappointed, but acknowledge that it is best to wait. Still, preparations have been made for these field visits, and our businesswomen know that as soon as it is safe to do so, we will be at their side to help assess and support their businesses. 

MGEF ALUMNA COMMUNITY SERVICE HIGHLIGHT

MGEF post-secondary student, Zainab, who is in nursing school, became very concerned about the many Maasai girls who had no access to sanitary napkins in rural areas due to the pandemic’s financial toll.  We were proud to learn that Zainab took the initiative, gathered a group of university students to raise money to purchase napkins, and distributed them to girls in a remote rural area in Kajiado County.  The group also provided a hot lunch to the girls and their families. MGEF promotes community service among our scholarship students, and we are always thankful to see our students and alumnae pay it forward in their local Maasai communities.

Though we still face hardships due to COVID-19, MGEF is very proud of our students as they continue to strive toward achieving their dreams.  These girls and young women are an inspiration.  Not only do they have to break through the still-pervasive traditional barriers that prevent them from getting an education, but now they are also demonstrating incredible perseverance and resilience as they confront new obstacles created by the pandemic.

Please stay safe and well.

MGEF Student Distributes Sanitary Napkins
MGEF Student Distributes Sanitary Napkins
New MGEF Scholarship Recipient
New MGEF Scholarship Recipient
Women's Business Training (WBT) Workshop
Women's Business Training (WBT) Workshop
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Returning MGEF Student Stops By The Office
Returning MGEF Student Stops By The Office

Dear Friends, 

Kenya opened all primary and secondary school grades the second week of January 2021.  MGEF was back to its normal business of getting supplies and school fees ready for the students as they stopped by the office on their way back to school. Of course, there were added precautions to keep such as masks and social distancing.  Fortunately, due to the mild climate, much of the activities could be done outside to help ensure the safety of our students and staff.  

MGEF’s roster this January has 133 students - 51 primary, 43 secondary, 35 post-secondary and 4 awaiting acceptance to higher institutions of learning.  

For primary and secondary students, January is usually the beginning of the school year in Kenya but school schedules have been greatly modified due to the pandemic and resulting school closures last March 2020.  The Kenyan government has implemented a two-year complicated plan to slowly get everyone back on track by January 2023, so each student’s schedule, depending on her grade level, will be a bit different than normal until that time.  

We are very proud of our post-secondary students, who adapted very well to virtual learning during the lockdown.  Despite the virus, we celebrated five graduations.  Three students received their Degrees and two who received Diplomas will return to school for their Degrees.  We also are proud of the seven recent secondary school graduates who, persisting through challenging logistics from the pandemic, applied and were accepted to post-secondary institutions.  They are now happy to be attending in-person as the campuses have opened throughout Kenya.

Over the past few months, Kenya has begun opening up and we have begun to see the repercussions of COVID19 and the lockdown.  MGEF-Kajiado’s Managing Director and our alumna intern were able to travel to visit some of our students who live in remote areas to better monitor their situations.  Many of our closer students have been able to visit the Kajiado office to check in and prepare for school.  The MGEF-Kajiado staff reported that early pregnancy is rampant all over the country because girls and boys have been socializing mainly without limits at their home villages since March.  Many of the old traditions also came back to life such as forced marriage and female genital cutting (FGC).  These observations are supported by recent reports noting a significant uptick in FGC, pregnancy and early marriage among Kenyan girls during school closures.  

MGEF has always been understanding of the cultural pressures Maasai girls face at home.   We do not judge and understand the pressures they face in the Maasai culture.  These girls grow up being told that they cannot say no to men’s advances.  With the students at home for months on end with no ongoing schooling and minimal structure, we knew our girls would face great pressures to succumb to old traditions.  Our stipends and continued contacts with students’ families were critical in raising the value of our students, ensuring they had food to eat, and helping to prevent forced marriage and early pregnancy.  But to our dismay, a few of our students, like hundreds of others across Kenya, did succumb.  

Yet, despite the long period of isolation and cultural pressures in their home villages, all but three of our more than 90 primary and secondary Scholarship students have restarted, or will be returning to, school this year.  One of these returning students was a young girl who we rescued from a forced marriage, a story we describe below.  We believe these numbers, while not perfect, are still far better than for other girls in the Maasai community.

An idea to combat food insecurity was brought front and center with the pandemic.  We are interested in developing a workshop to teach the Maasai community how to plant vegetable gardens on their land.  A few of our alumnae and staff are avid gardeners and their ability to supply their families with homegrown food from the garden was very important during this difficult year.  One of our alumnae had such a large crop that she has gone into a side business of selling tomatoes from her garden.  

As said above, one of our students was forcibly married off in her home village during the school closures.  Forced marriage is not that unusual in Maasai communities but for our Scholarship student, her outcome is not common - she was one of the lucky ones.  We will call her J, so as to keep her privacy.  J is from a very poor, polygamous family of 15 children. Her mother died when she was only 5, leaving her and 14 brothers and sisters to her father and his second wife.  When J’s mother passed away, however, her father disowned J and all her mother’s children, opting to support only those of his other wife.  J and her siblings spent years being passed around from relative to relative.  

J loved to learn, and one of her uncles helped her attend primary school.  He even paid for her first year of high school before one of her older brothers took her out to marry her off for a dowry.  Her uncle again intervened, but she was ultimately unable to continue her education for lack of school fees.  J was afraid to go home, though.  She knew she would be married off, so she sought refuge with an aunt who, luckily, had heard of MGEF.  

I happened to be in the office when J and her aunt came in to fill out an application.  J became a part of the MGEF family on the spot that day in July 2018, and she has done very well in her classes.  When I have seen her on my visits to Kenya, she is always friendly and helpful, and full of life and smiles. 

But in early December 2020, MGEF-Kajiado’s Managing Director, Ms. Ntayia was contacted by J’s aunt.  She had been married off while at home during the lockdown!  Our hearts sank, but Ms. Ntayia jumped into action.  With the help and support of J’s aunt and the MGEF board member from her local area, J’s forced marriage was annulled.  She returned to school immediately--just in time to sit for her exams.

Throughout Kajiado County, where MGEF operates, COVID19 has devastated the meager income that Maasai families survive on.  As a result, the MGEF-Kajiado staff have seen a significant surge of desperate girls and families in search of scholarships.  Often, we only have one chance to help these girls before they are forcibly married off and destined to a hard life of manual labor and poverty.  Beyond our usual eight new students accepted per year, we hope to add several additional scholarships to save girls facing the most desperate situations even though it is heart wrenching to choose with so many in need.  

All of our students are happy to be returning to school.  We thank all of you for your support during this difficult time.  It means a lot to our students to know there are people all over the world who support their efforts and root for their success.  

2021 Sponsorship Recipient
2021 Sponsorship Recipient
MGEF Scholar Graduates With A Degree In Commerce
MGEF Scholar Graduates With A Degree In Commerce
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MGEF Awards A New Scholarship To A Girl In Need
MGEF Awards A New Scholarship To A Girl In Need

Dear friends,

As the world continues to cope with COVID19, we are happy to report that as of this date, all of our students are safe, healthy and none forced into marriage.  With schools closed and young girls at home, this in itself is a success story that we gratefully celebrate every day.  

Due to the virus, MGEF held their Annual Fundraiser online this past July.  The fundraiser was dedicated to ensuring the survival of our students and their families during the COVID19 pandemic, as most families had lost any source of income and were struggling to put food on the table. Thanks to our supporters, we are now able to send monthly stipends to almost 100 of our students’ families through December 2020.  This stipend not only provides food for our students, but also creates a constant line of communication with our students and their families.  All of the families want to make sure that MGEF knows that they are taking very good care of our Scholarship recipients because our students have now become a lifeline of income for the family that they cannot afford to lose. 

Kenya, like other nations, is trying to slowly open up for business.  Their COVID19 case numbers have been low, but the government is still highly cautious and appropriately do not take this virus lightly.  The country’s primary and secondary schools initially planned to open in January 2021, and to simply repeat the entire school year even though Term 1 was already completed in 2020.  This had some parents and students unhappy, but in general this appeared to be an acceptable plan of action to the country.  Most Kenyans were on board and planning for a January start.

More recently, though, in mid-September, the Kenyan government changed course and decided to open the schools in a matter of weeks.  Teachers were to report back to their schools and await the arrival of students a couple weeks later.  Although safety preparations, sanitation guidelines or protocols were not formally provided to prepare for the return of the students, teachers packed up, left their family homes and headed back to schools.  Parents, teachers and students alike were completely surprised by this sudden announcement and waited in nervous and reluctant anticipation.  The decision for students to return to schools was then canceled at the end of September.  

A new press release was just issued October 6th, stating that certain grades should report to school on Monday, October 12th.   The plan has confused many and all wait to see if the government changes their minds once again.  Under the new plan, students directed to return are those who would have been promoted at the end of 2020 if school had been in session for the entire year.  This new directive affects students in primary Class 4, which graduates to Class 5 (5th grade) and switches to a grading system instead of pass/fail.  It also applies to Class 8 (8th grade), which graduates from primary to secondary school Form 1, and to Form 4 (high school senior), which graduates from secondary school.  The plan at the moment indicates that these students will start Term 2 now and Term 3 in January 2021.  They will sit for their exams in March 2021 and graduate at the end of what is usually Term 1 for the year.  The others will start in January 2021 as is the usual tradition and repeat the entire year. While there is much uncertainty about the country’s new plan, MGEF is prepared to help our students move forward safely under all scenarios.  We and our capable staff in Kajiado understand that these are uncertain times for everyone as the world tries to navigate through this disease.

Activities for our post-secondary students differ from those of primary and secondary school students.  Some of our post-secondary students’ schools were able to switch to online studies this fall (although a few others have decided to open up campuses soon since the latest press release). These students were in need of laptops in order to keep up with their studies and their academic standing in their schools.  If they were unable to participate in online classes, they might forfeit their position at their schools.  Thanks to the generosity of those sponsors who donated the balance of their 2020 sponsorships to the MGEF COVID19 Emergency Fund, we have been able to supply the laptops needed for our students continue their classes.  These laptops and the continuous support from all of you means so much to these aspiring Maasai women. In times of insecurity, it gives our girls hope and determination to know others are there for them no matter what obstacles they must face.

Due to the pandemic, MGEF-Kajiado staff and the MGEF-Kajiado Board Members (all Maasai women) are already seeing young girls, mothers, fathers and other family members coming to them desperate for aid.  They anticipate that this will only become more prevalent over time.  Many have lost, and will not be able to revive, their small businesses that they previously survived on.  They will not have the finances to send their daughters to school this January, and most likely will not be able to provide for them as well.  Therefore, some gains of the past decade are expected to regress, as many Maasai girls will face female genital cutting (FGC) and forced early marriage.  MGEF would like to help every girl in need, but at least we have secured funds in our MGEF COVID19 Emergency Fund to add a few extra students to our roster in 2021. 

It has been a difficult year around the world, but we are proud of our team on the ground in Kajiado - MGEF-Kajiado staff, Kenyan Board members, alumnae and, of course, our students.  They have faced these challenges head on and worked as a family to ensure all stay healthy and safe in order to return to school and continue with their dreams of an education.  Our team members have been in constant contact and supporting each other during this difficult time. We thank all of you for continuing to support our mission and the lives of these wonderful girls and young women as they change the world slowly, one step at a time with their accomplishments.

New Laptops Arrive For Online Classes
New Laptops Arrive For Online Classes
MGEF University Student Attending An Online Class
MGEF University Student Attending An Online Class
MGEF Student Learns to Sew During The Pandemic
MGEF Student Learns to Sew During The Pandemic
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MGEF Scholars Are Eager To Return To School
MGEF Scholars Are Eager To Return To School

Dear Friends,

MGEF started out 2020 by accepting seven new scholarship students, who were chosen by our new junior board members, all MGEF alumni, with input by the elder board members.  This brought our roster up to 136 active students – 48 primary, 46 secondary, 31 post-secondary and 11 students waiting for acceptance into institutions of higher learning.  

We were busy during the first two months of 2020 with the usual beginning of school tasks such as enrolling Form One secondary students in their new schools, making sure students had their supplies and transport to school, and addressing any issues new and old students may have had with their schools.  Then the COVID pandemic became a worldwide crisis.  Shortly after the first positive COVID case in the United States, Kenya had its first case, and like other countries around the world, everyday life in Kenya dramatically changed.  

Once schools were closed on March 16th, all of MGEF’s primary and secondary scholarship students dropped by the office on their way home, many confused, scared and uninformed.  The post-secondary students touched base by phone; though they were more aware of the situation, they were still scared and needed reassurance.  The staff immediately went into action, with instructions about how to help keep them and their families safe and well.  They addressed washing of hands, social distancing, masks (which were difficult to find and must be handmade), isolating at home to stay safe, and most importantly, staying away from boys which now is not just a matter of getting pregnant, but also a matter of life and death.  Many of the children had not even been told why they were being sent home and were in great need of explanations and reassurance.  

The staff also had to make sure that all rescue girls who could not go home (e.g., due to risk of family violence or forced marriage) were safely in place at the schools with rescue centers that MGEF has partnered with for many years.  Transportation and logistics for these rescue students were immediately dealt with.  Thanks to our MGEF-Kajiado staff, all of our girls made it home safely or are in secure rescue shelters.  

Now several months later, MGEF-Kajiado’s Managing Director, Lucy, and Program Director, Abigael, remain vigilant about keeping in contact with all of the scholarship students.  We are very happy to report that as of now, everyone is healthy though COVID cases in Kenya continue to rise.  Unfortunately, we have discovered that our students’ families are struggling to provide food for their families.  The meager living that they once survived on has been lost due to closures of markets.  They can no longer sell their milk, livestock or beads.  The girls, who are usually away at boarding school, have become an extra mouth to feed during an extremely tough time.  MGEF decided to send a stipend for food to our students’ families to help.  This will not only keep our girls fed but they will also become the only source of food for the entire family during the shutdown.  This will raise their value to the family and will deter any thoughts of the girls being married off before they are safely back in school.  

Kenya had originally hoped to reopen schools at the end of June, but they have decided it is too soon and made the announcement just last week that they would reopen schools in September.  We were relieved, for we feared it might be too soon with respect to COVID, but yet, at the same time, we know it is best for our girls to be in school where they are safe from forced female genital cutting  and early marriage.  

Another development from the pandemic has been the decision by many universities and colleges to switch to online learning.  This has enabled quite a few of our post-secondary students to continue their studies.  Though this has been a real challenge for most of our students because they live in rural areas where internet access is very limited.  A few girls who have smart phones have been able to access information so they can continue their studies without too much trouble. Others have had to borrow phones which is very unreliable.  Due to this situation, MGEF decided it was necessary to invest in some laptops for the students to borrow for their classes.

As we all navigate through this difficult time, MGEF hopes all are safe and well and would like to thank everyone for their generous support of MGEF.  I have received many notes from alumnae, students, board members and other friends in Kenya.  All send their love and are so thankful for all you have done for their community through the education of their daughters, sisters, mothers and aunts.  

 

Thank you

 

Heather

2020 MGEF Scholarship Recipient Joan
2020 MGEF Scholarship Recipient Joan
MGEF Alumni Help Mentor Maasai Girls During COVID
MGEF Alumni Help Mentor Maasai Girls During COVID
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Maasai Girls Education Fund

Location: Washington, DC - USA
Website:
Project Leader:
Heather McKay
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Washington, DC United States
$50,198 raised of $95,000 goal
 
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