Apply to Join

Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project

by Conservation Volunteers Australia
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project

Volunteers hard at work protecting and restoring the native habitat of a much loved icon

 

 The gregarious Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoos was once widespread across the West Australian Wheatbelt. It is now recognised as an endangered species. This wonderful icon has suffered huge reductions in population size - falling by over 50% in just 45 years.

 The Beeliar Regional Park is an ecologically significant reserve in the Perth Metropolitan area providing a vast diversity of native habitat for Carnaby Black Cockatoo’s living within the urban landscape.

 Volunteers again rallied to help Conservation Volunteers Australia further assist the City of Cockburn. Their much valued work made it possible to plant 600 native seedlings in the bush reserve surrounding Bibra Lake. This will significantly contribute to the ongoing expansion of Carnaby Cockatoo habitat within the Beeliar Regional Park.

 Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoos face many major challenges, some of these include; the clearance of their feeding and nesting habitat, destruction of nesting hollows and significant rivalry with other species for nesting sites, along with the serious issue of plundering.

 Since European settlement, 56% of its habitat has been cleared, mainly for agriculture. Conservation Volunteers Australia has a long standing and ongoing partnership with the City of Cockburn to revegetate large areas of cleared land surrounding Bibra Lake with the purpose of increasing habitat connectivity within the reserve for our native wildlife.

 The Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoos have a particularly low rate of breeding and the young birds have an especially long period of relying on the parent birds leaving them vulnerable to sudden changes to their environment.

 

Without the support of our wonderful volunteers and kind supporters, CVA would not have been able to achieve the important milestones we have to date.

 And with everyone’s ongoing assistance, we can continue to make a difference to our most vulnerable native species.

 

Thank you again for all your amazing support.

 

Tristan Duke

State Manager, Western Australia

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Photo Credit: Robert Nylander
Photo Credit: Robert Nylander

Conservation Volunteers Australia (CVA) for over 10 years, and through the engagement of community members, have been restoring areas of natural habitat creating green ecological corridors for iconic South West Black Cockatoos; the endangered Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus latirostris) and the threatened Forrest Red Tail Black Cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus banksii). The Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo and Forrest Red Tail Black Cockatoo are unique to the South West of Western Australia, from Geraldton to Esperance.

 

Since the 1970s, the population of the Carnaby’s Cockatoo has declined by more than a half. This is due to clearance of feeding and nesting habitat, removal of mature (at least 200-year-old) Eucalyptus trees that bear nesting hollows, competition from feral birds for existing nesting hollows and poaching. All of which are from human intervention.

 

Humans also have the choice to control the rate of these threatened birds by acting now to make a difference. CVA facilitates project days for people that want to make a difference by donating their time to volunteer with CVA and support habitat restoration for these federally protected birds. The Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo and Forrest Red Tail black Cockatoo are protected species under the Commonwealth’s Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Act 1999 and Western Australia’s Western Australian Wildlife Conservation Act 1950, regrettably their habitat is not protected resulting in their populations decline.

 

By making a donation, you enable the mobilisation of CVA Volunteer teams to work across the Perth metropolitan region and South West of Western Australia to protect and restore significant green ecological linkages for the bird’s survival. This is through revegetation of natural habitat and food sources and the suppressing of exotic invasive weeds and allows for native seedlings to germinate and grow. This along with protecting water sources vital for their survival, and the promotion of community education and knowledge transfer, will all assist in safeguarding and the restoration of these significant species and ecosystems.

 

Last financial year’s funding is being put towards habitat restoration for the Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo with the City of Cockburn, in partnership with the South West Group. The project will focus on weed management of revegetation sites to protect native seedlings survival rates to establish foraging grounds for the Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo in their urban movements of fragmented native bushland.

 Thank you for all your wonderful support.

Tristan Duke

State Manager, Western Australia

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

Conservation Volunteers Australia (CVA) for over 10 years, and through the engagement of community members, have been restoring areas of natural habitat creating green ecological corridors for iconic South West Black Cockatoos; the endangered Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus latirostris) and the threatened Forrest Red Tail Black Cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus banksii).  The Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo and Forrest Red Tail Black Cockatoo are unique to the South West of Western Australia, from Geraldton to Esperance.

 

Since the 1970s, the population of the Carnaby’s Cockatoo has declined by more than a half.  This is due to clearance of feeding and nesting habitat, removal of mature (at least 200-year-old) Eucalyptus trees that bear nesting hollows, competition from feral birds for existing nesting hollows and poaching.  All of which are from human intervention.

 

Humans also have the choice to control the rate of these threatened birds by acting now to make a difference.  CVA facilitates project days for people that want to make a difference by donating their time to volunteer with CVA and support habitat restoration for these federally protected birds.  The Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo and Forrest Red Tail black Cockatoo are protected species under the Commonwealth’s Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Act 1999 and Western Australia’s Western Australian Wildlife Conservation Act 1950, regrettably their habitat is not protected resulting in their populations decline.

 

By making a donation, you enable the mobilisation of CVA Volunteer teams to work across the Perth metropolitan region and South West of Western Australia to protect and restore significant green ecological linkages for the bird’s survival.  This is through revegetation of natural habitat and food sources and the suppressing of exotic invasive weeds and allows for native seedlings to germinate and grow. This along with protecting water sources vital for their survival, and the promotion of community education and knowledge transfer, will all assist in safeguarding and the restoration of these significant species and ecosystems.

 

Tristan Duke

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Red Tail Black Cockatoo
Red Tail Black Cockatoo

Conservation Volunteers Australia (CVA) is working in partnership with the South West Group (SWG) and five of its Council Members; City of Cockburn, City of Fremantle, City of Kwinana, City of Melville and Town of East Fremantle to enhance and extend a regional network of ecological linkages connecting local and state government managed land in the south west metropolitan region.   

 

CVA is assisting these local governments to enhance these ecological linkages by engaging volunteers to undertake a range of practical conservation activities.  The objective of the partnership is to engage local residents in local environmental projects, increase community awareness of environmental threats and issues, and to enhance the condition of the region’s natural areas to preserve or improve its biodiversity values and the community’s enjoyment of those areas. 

 

Importantly, the work being undertaken is contributing to the preservation and improvement of the natural habitat for the Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo (listed as Endangered under Commonwealth legislation) and the Forest Red Tail Black Cockatoo (listed as Vulnerable).  This sees volunteers undertaking conservation activities that protect waterways and improve the habitat values of natural areas.  Our volunteers also engage in the protection of threatened ecological communities such as Banksia Woodlands of the Swan Coastal Plain.  Banksia Woodlands are an important foraging ground for the Carnaby’s Cockatoo and is declared threatened due to human impacts such as land clearing for urbanisation and spread of pathogens such as Phytophthora Dieback. 

 

Since July 2017, CVA volunteers have been actively enhancing ecological linkages that support Black Cockatoos in their foraging and roosting habitats.  Volunteers have contributed 5,770 hours in conservation activities, planted 23,763 native seedlings and cleared nearly 458,000m2 of invasive weeds species. 

 

Your generous donations continue to enable further engagement of the community in local and state initiatives that deliver on-ground activities which protect threatened species and communities, and which actively contribute to ‘greener’ cities. 

 

Thank you for your continuing support.

Tristan Duke, Regional Manager - Perth 

Carnaby's Cockatoo needs your help
Carnaby's Cockatoo needs your help
Carnaby's Cockatoo
Carnaby's Cockatoo
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

Our community conservation teams have been out in force in Beeliar Regional Park this year, helping the City of Cockburn plant native species and remove invasive weeds around Bibra Lake.

Carnaby’s Cockatoos breed mainly in the inland agricultural areas of southern Western Australia, but they generally move closer to the coast from early summer to autumn. Their main remaining food source and roosting areas are on the Swan coastal plain in banksia and eucalypt woodlands, with Bibra Lake being an important nesting site for these cockatoos within the metropolitan region.

Invasive weeds are one of the largest threats to important habitat remnants, such as Bibra Lake, with introduced species being responsible for destroying native habitats by outcompeting the native vegetation.

One such invasive species is the Castor Oil, with large groves taking over the lakes banks, which are home to a variety of native mammals, reptiles and is an extremely important site for both native and migratory birds. Over two days in May, volunteers removed an incredible 6,075 square metres of dense Castor Oil, fighting off thorny Spear Thistle and collecting 18 kilograms of litter as they went.

The City’s Environmental Officers and bush crew were delighted with the volunteers’ efforts, commenting on what the large and passionate volunteer team were able complete in one day when it should have taken them a week. The Castor Oil Battle of May 2018 will forever be remembered by our volunteers, who, when asked if they would come back to help in the continuing war on weeds around Bibra Lake said, “Bring it on!”

Your very generous donations continue to allow us to engage the community in local conservation initiatives. We’d like to thank you, and all our supporters and volunteers who are passionate about making a difference for the local environment and our endangered native species. Further donations will allow us to continue this important work – please help us if you can.

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
 

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating.

Get Reports via Email

We'll only email you new reports and updates about this project.

Organization Information

Conservation Volunteers Australia

Location: Mount Pleasant, Victoria - Australia
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @CVAustralia
Project Leader:
Madeline Townsend
Mt Helen, Ballarat, Victoria Australia
$7,576 raised of $15,000 goal
 
41 donations
$7,424 to go
Donate Now
lock
Donating through GlobalGiving is safe, secure, and easy with many payment options to choose from. View other ways to donate

Conservation Volunteers Australia has earned this recognition on GlobalGiving:
Add Project to Favorites

Help raise money!

Support this important cause by creating a personalized fundraising page.

Start a Fundraiser

Learn more about GlobalGiving

Teenage Science Students
Vetting +
Due Diligence

Snorkeler
Our
Impact

Woman Holding a Gift Card
Give
Gift Cards

Young Girl with a Bicycle
GlobalGiving
Guarantee

Sign up for the GlobalGiving Newsletter

WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.