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Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project

by Conservation Volunteers Australia
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Red-tailed Black Cockatoo in flight
Red-tailed Black Cockatoo in flight

Over the past few months, our volunteers have been busy rehabilitating the black cockatoo habitat across Perth, and preparing sites for major re-vegetation projects. Since March, over 140 volunteers have helped to remove an amazing 2.7 hectares of invasive weed species from bush land areas such as Allen Park, Shenton Park, Bibra Lake and reserves along the Swan Estuary. These sites provide habitat critical to the Carnabys Black Cockatoo and the Forest Red-tailed Black Cockatoo.

In early April, our teams took part in the Great Cocky Count for the fifth year running! This is a citizen science project developed by Birdlife Australia where bird enthusiasts, the conservation oriented and keen community volunteers band together every year to count the comings and goings of cockatoos from known roosting sites at twilight. The result is a snapshot of Carnabys and Forest Red-tailed populations across Perth and the South West, providing valuable long-term data that assists with ongoing management of these beautiful birds.

We are continuing our rehabilitation efforts at The Orchard, near the Kaarakin Black Cockatoo Conservation Centre. 28 volunteers assisted with 42 hours of weed removal, which was further supported by students during our school holiday program who helped map out the vegetation. Volunteers were also treated to a walk-and-talk tour at the Kaarakin Black Cockatoo Conservation Centre, and got to meet several Forest Red-tailed Black Cockatoos, including cheeky Fluffbum and affectionate Betty in the interactive enclosure.

On the 24th & 27th April, our Training Coordinator, Richard McDowell, visited volunteer teams at Lesmurdie Falls National Park and Yule Brook, both significant sites for feeding and roosting black cockatoos. Richard showed the team how to identify invasive weed species to effectively contribute to restoration and rehabilitation in these areas.  

As winter approaches, our teams will start on re-vegetation projects that will add ecological value to remaining bushland areas.

We would like to thank our supporters, donors and our volunteers.  Without your support, we wouldn’t be able to make a difference to this important cause.  If you are able to donate again, or share our story, we would really appreciate it – every effort will help us to continue achieving these great conservation results and give these beautiful birds a better chance at coming back from the brink of extinction.

Volunteers in the interactive enclosure
Volunteers in the interactive enclosure
Richard discussing cockatoo habitat
Richard discussing cockatoo habitat
Important weeding at The Orchard
Important weeding at The Orchard

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The first quarter of 2017 has seen our volunteers start on some exciting new projects at Whiteman Park at Kaarakin Black Cockatoo Conservation Centre that will assist Carnabys Black Cockatoo habitat within the Swan Coastal Plain.

Whiteman Park has partnered with Conservation Volunteers Australia since mid-2009, supporting our Habitat and Catchment Restoration Programs in the Swan region. The most recent program of activities through January - February 2017 have seen our teams aid Environment Officer Andrew in a number of weed control, litter collection and track maintenance activities.

Volunteers contributed 189 hours to these projects, volunteering in all conditions including one of the hottest days in January and one of the wettest in February.  The team volunteered at four different sites within the park; weeding along both the Red Walk Trail and the rail line to Mussel Pool, pruning throughout the Children’s Forest to maintain tracks and collecting litter along the creek bed and surrounding bush and park land along Bennett Brook.  Whiteman Park provides large areas of habitat for the black cockatoos

Hannah, Team Leader for Conservation Volunteers Australia said, “The team had a fantastic time at Whiteman Park, managing to catch sight of an array of wildlife while putting in a massive conservation effort. Even though they were faced with some challenging weather with an entire day of drizzle at Bennett Brook and a couple of very hot days, the volunteers did an amazing job. Andrew was a pleasure to work with and had great knowledge of the park.”

Conservation Volunteers Australia has been partnered with Kaarakin since 2009 and our focus in 2017 will be for Conservation Volunteers Australia to manage The Orchard.  The Orchard is a parcel of land adjacent to the centre that has seen several years of successful planting efforts by volunteers.  We are now helping to control the invasive weeds that have returned to the area and are choking the creek line through the site.  Volunteers have set up photo monitoring points throughout the area and have started to remove some of the weed species.

We would like to thank our Global Giving donors, supporters and volunteers.  Without your support, we wouldn’t be able to make a difference to this important cause.  If you are able to donate again we would really appreciate it – every donation will help us to continue achieving these great conservation results and give these beautiful birds a better chance at coming back from the brink of extinction.

Conservation Heroes!
Conservation Heroes!
Volunteering is fun!
Volunteering is fun!
A Gould's Monitor found on site
A Gould's Monitor found on site
Track maintenance!
Track maintenance!
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Red-tailed Black Cockatoo
Red-tailed Black Cockatoo

The last couple of months have seen our volunteer teams finish up with a lot of our planting projects, and start on our green stock and track maintenance activities.  Volunteers have also had the opportunity to visit a couple of primary schools where they have assisted teachers by building outdoor and living classrooms.  Teachers will now be able to use these outdoor natural spaces to educate students about sustainability, Reduce Reuse Recycle, ecosystems and life cycles.

One of these projects was at Orange Grove Primary School where the students built nesting boxes for the Black Cockatoos earlier this year.  Every time the team visits the school, they monitor all five of the nesting boxes for signs of use.  So far the smaller parrot boxes have visible scratching marks and staff from the school have seen the Black Cockatoos checking out the larger nesting boxes.  Volunteers have also helped with sustainability projects at the school, helping to build veggie gardens and compost heaps.  The Principal, Ms Cole was extremely happy with the activities completed by the volunteers, “Thank you so much for your help, the students are now researching what veggies they will plant and when”.     

Our volunteers were once again lucky to be visited by flocks of Black Cockatoos this quarter.  Teams helping with invasive weed removal on Ferndale were witness to a small flock of Red Tailed Black Cockatoos, feeding and playing in the nearby trees. Long-time regular volunteer, Mr Nylander, caught some great shots of the flock and Regional Coordinator Ms Haynes said “It’s great for the volunteers to see the beautiful birds in the wild.  Their huge effort to restore the Black Cockatoos habitat is immediately rewarded with the large birds’ playful behaviour in the sky”.

For the rest of the year, our volunteers will be focusing on the maintenance of the thousands of seedlings that we planted over winter. It’s a big task, but an important one to secure the future of this vulnerable species.

Conservation Volunteers Australia (CVA) would like to thank our supporters, volunteers and donors.  Without your support, CVA wouldn’t be able to make a difference to this important cause.  If you are able to donate again we would really appreciate it – every donation will help us to continue achieving these great conservation results and give these beautiful birds a better chance at coming back from the brink of extinction.

Volunteers Planting Future Nesting Sites
Volunteers Planting Future Nesting Sites
Future Food for the Cockatoos
Future Food for the Cockatoos
Delicious!
Delicious!

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Happy Volunteers Planting for the Cockatoos
Happy Volunteers Planting for the Cockatoos

Welcome Friends of Cockatoo Conservation,

The last three months have been busy for our volunteer teams.  With winter in full swing, we have been planting thousands of tree seedlings and preparing planting sites to help other community groups with their tree planting efforts for the cockatoos.

 

In July our volunteers had some important visitors to one of our project sites to supervise our planting efforts.  A large flock of Red-tailed Black Cockatoos sat in the trees, and watched on as we planted native seedlings which will grow into food and roosting sources for this vulnerable species.  Red tails are notoriously cheeky and playful birds, and our volunteers watched as they crash-landed into each other on the tree branches and mucked about in the sky. 

 

Conservation volunteer, Nanae Arato, travelled from Japan to take part on our program, and was excited to see the red tails.  She said, “It’s amazing to see the birds that we are planting these seedlings for, they are beautiful!”  The rest of the team also enjoyed the red tails’ visit as it really hit home, how all their efforts will directly help the local wildlife.

 

From July to the end of August, our volunteers spent time at a number of key sites for the black cockatoos around Perth.   These included bushland sites in Nedlands and Inglewood.  These inner suburban sites form important green corridors, that provide protection for the black cockatoos as they search for food and roosting sites.  Revegetating and maintaining these corridors forms an important part of the rehabilitation plan for these birds.

 

We would like to thank our supporters and volunteers.  Without your support, Conservation Volunteers Australia wouldn’t be able to make a difference to this important cause.  If you are able to donate again, we would really appreciate it – every donation will help us to continue achieving these great conservation results and give these beautiful birds a better chance at coming back from the brink of extinction.  For the rest of the year, our volunteers will be focusing on the essential maintenance of the thousands of seedlings that we planted over winter to give the best possible chance for these new cockatoo habitats to grow and thrive.  

So... What's happening here?
So... What's happening here?
Planting in a prepared site
Planting in a prepared site
Yummy! We can't wait for the new trees to grow!
Yummy! We can't wait for the new trees to grow!
Majestic!
Majestic!

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Volunteers administering life saving injection
Volunteers administering life saving injection

Dear friends in Cockatoo conservation,

The Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus latirostris) is endemic to South-West of Western Australia. The Carnaby’s populations have declined by over 50% in the past 45 years, and as a result they are now listed as an Endangered Species. The Carnaby's is a highly mobile species. They need to move sequentially through the landscape, utilising different habitat types at different times of the year. The decline in numbers of the Carnaby's Black-Cockatoo is due primarily to the loss and fragmentation of habitat, upon which the rely to survive.

Over the last three months volunteers from Perth’s Conservation Volunteers Australia (CVA) office were able to participate in dieback injecting, due to a donation from Alcoa’s Kwinana refinery.  The City of Kwinana is dedicated to conserving remnant vegetation and ecological corridors as habitat for the Carnaby's. Ecological corridors are areas of local native vegetation linking local biodiversity areas, such as remnant bushland and other natural areas. These ecological linkages provide important feeding and roosting sites for the Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo.

The city has several bushland spots that are susceptible to the effects of Dieback. Phytophthora dieback is caused by the plant pathogen, Phytophthora cinnamomi, which kills susceptible plants, such as banksia, jarrah and grass trees, by attacking their root systems. Dieback is a symptom of a Phytophthora infection, and affects more than 40% of the native plant species, and 50% of the endangered species in the south-west of Western Australia. The plants die because they cannot take up the water and nutrients they need to flourish.

Dedicated volunteers spent time in three bushland reserves within the City injecting susceptible trees with phosphite.  Working from GPS locations that the City provided, the team worked in areas with heavily dieback infested trees, trying to strengthen trees that have not yet been infected by the disease.

From April to June, volunteers also spent time preparing sites for this winter’s planting season.  Due to Perth’s temperate climate, natural resource management groups only have a small window of opportunity to plant trees in the ground. Preparing sites in advance of the first winter rains, allows planting efforts to be maximised during this optimum period.  Some groups of volunteers even had the opportunity to help with some early planting at some of our riverine sites with the South East Regional Centre for Urban Landcare (SERCUL). 

CVA would like to thank our GlobalGiving supporters and volunteers.  Without your support, CVA wouldn’t be able to make a difference to this important cause.  If you are able to donate again we would really appreciate it – every donation will help us to continue achieving these great conservation results and give these beautiful cockatoos a better chance at coming back from the brink of extinction.  Why not take advantage of the special GlobalGiving Bonus Day on June 15 - where an amazing 50% of your kind donation (up to $1,000) being matched.  So please consider our Cockatoo’s this winter and donate on June 15.  Please put a reminder in your phone or calendar today and share this story with your friends and work mates!

Tree dieback protection for Cockatoo's future
Tree dieback protection for Cockatoo's future
Essential tree planting for Cockatoo habitat
Essential tree planting for Cockatoo habitat
Another tree lovingly placed in the ground!
Another tree lovingly placed in the ground!
One of our beautiful red-tails
One of our beautiful red-tails
The majestic Carnaby's Black Cockatoo
The majestic Carnaby's Black Cockatoo

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Organization Information

Conservation Volunteers Australia

Location: Mount Pleasant, Victoria - Australia
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @CVAustralia
Project Leader:
Brett Atkins
Ballarat, Victoria Australia
$7,576 raised of $15,000 goal
 
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