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Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project

by Conservation Volunteers Australia
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Project
Carnaby's Cockatoos perched lovingly in old tree
Carnaby's Cockatoos perched lovingly in old tree

Dear Friends in Conservation,

This summer has been a hive of activity in Perth with exciting projects for the Carnaby's Black Cockatoo.  In January, we completed our Summer Program under the strong rays of sunshine, engaging volunteers in a half day of educational activities across the metro area. Volunteers took part in dieback prevention, injecting species at St Emilie’s Primary School in Canning Vale.  This involved drilling small guide holes at intervals around the tree trunk and injecting phosphite into the holes.  Over 40% of Western Australia’s native plant species are susceptible to dieback, including banksias and jarrah which are important species for the Carnabys.  Injecting susceptible trees with phosphite can reduce the spread of the disease and control its impact.

During February, we visited Orange Grove Primary School and conducted a nesting box workshop with students.  A very special guest accompanied us, Simon Cherriman, B.Sc Hons (Env. Biol.), MSciComm (Nat. Hist. Film) who is an Environmental Biologist, Educator, Filmmaker, Wedge-tailed Eagle Specialist and a professional tree climber.  The whole school was involved in the morning’s presentation with Simon who inspired the students and shared with them the plight of the Carnabys Black Cockatoo.  The older students then spent the rest of the day constructing parrot and Carnabys nesting boxes, which were installed around the school by Simon.  Simon Cherriman shared his gratefulness “… for the opportunity to reach more children with (his) nest box work.”  Since the workshop, students have been outside every day, observing bird behaviour around the nesting boxes.   The students are recording all animal activity on a school website blog, and all observations are added to Simon’s database, including seeing a couple of Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo’s sitting on top of one of their nest boxes. 

This month saw the first Conservation Volunteers Australia Business Clean Up Day Challenge at Sir James Mitchell Park in South Perth.  This large park is in the middle of Perth’s inner city suburbia, and the melaleuca groves provide shaded spots for Carnabys to rest during their daily search for food and water.  Three separate teams competed to collect the most rubbish from this area, which by the end of the day totalled 116kg.  Rubbish collection is an important activity that protects our native fauna from unnecessary injury.  Some of the more unusual items found were a set of car keys, three passports and perfectly usable wooden chair.

Outside of these activities highlighted above, our volunteer teams have been regularly visiting an important site for the Carnabys Black Cockatoo.  Yanchep National Park is 40km to the north of Perth, and is home to many large flocks of Carnabys.  This area is also a key release site for rehabilitated Carnaby’s.  The Department of Parks and Wildlife in conjunction with Kaarakin Black Cockatoo Conservation Centre have released several flocks here.  Loch Mcness is the main water source within the national park, and has many creeks running into it.   One of these creeks was strangled with the weed ‘typha’, blocking water flow.  Teams have been working to remove the typha over the last few months.  Before they started, the water wasn’t even visible.  Now, we are happy to report, that this creek now once again carries fresh water back into Loch Mcness.  Carnabys have been seen drinking from the creek, and the project was deemed a huge success by the Parks and Wildlife Rangers.      

Conservation Volunteers Australia would like to thank our supporters and volunteers, for their ongoing support.  Without this support, we wouldn’t be able to make a difference to the future of the Carnaby’s and Red-tailed Black Cockatoos, and spread the important message on conserving these species.  If you are able to donate again, this will be greatly appreciated as every donation enables the continuation of such positive results, and gives these beautiful birds a better chance at coming back from the brink of extinction.

Students of Orange Grove making nesting boxes
Students of Orange Grove making nesting boxes
Simon Cherriman installing boxes in school grounds
Simon Cherriman installing boxes in school grounds
Sorting rubbish collected during clean up day
Sorting rubbish collected during clean up day
Volunteers clearing strangled creek of typha weed
Volunteers clearing strangled creek of typha weed

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Volunteers 'managing' noxious weeds!
Volunteers 'managing' noxious weeds!

Dear Friends in Conservation,

The weather is starting to heat up in Perth, and wildlife centres will start to see an increase in Carnaby’s Cookatoo numbers coming through their clinics. Climate change is having a severely negative impact on the survival rate of both juvenile and adult birds, with long hot summers and shorter and dryer winters limiting water sources and increasing the loss of trees, and the Carnaby’s access to food, shelter and nesting.

With the very real and present danger to the ongoing survival of the Carnaby’s Cookatoo , we at Conservation Volunteers Australia are happy to report the increase in the number of programs we are involved with, conserving the important Carnaby’s habitat within the Perth metro area.  Over the last three months these programs have included our community volunteers, indigenous conservation training program participants and Earth Assist school students, all thanks to your generous donations to this project through Global Giving.

Your donations have enabled us to send out 30 volunteers (three teams), spreading across the north, east and south metro areas of Perth.  These teams have been carefully collecting and processing seeds for propagation at several nurseries around Perth.  This ensures that endemic species are planted where they were originally found.  The teams have also been treating dieback affected trees, with some special TLC, and helping with flora and fauna surveys, in high profile sites for the Carnaby’s Cockatoo.

We are excited to have welcomed nearly 70 students over the past few months to key locations of Cockatoo habitat.  The students engaged first hand in learning more about the plight of the Carnaby’s Cockatoo and their important role in helping to maintain the future of this species.  These amazing student volunteers removed an astounding 4,600m2 of noxious weeds at several key locations, including Kaarakin Black Cockatoo Conservation Centre, Kanyana Wildlife Centre, Perth Hills Discovery Centre and Piney Lakes Environment Centre.

Our community volunteers have been spending time at many important roosting and feeding sites around Pert, including Baigup Wetlands, Bibra Lake and Garungup Reserve.  In just the last three months we have welcomed  468 volunteers, who have donated their time and planted 7,658 native seedlings and removed a further  49,840m2 of invasive weeds. 

Volunteer teams have also been spending one day a month at Lake Claremont, ensuring seedlings planted this past winter, receive adequate water to survive the harsh Australian summer, and increase their root systems to deeper water supplies.  The Friends of Lake Claremont are leading one of the largest ongoing restoration projects in Perth.  Coordinator Heidi stated, “We rely on help from people in the local and wider communities to implement our projects.  We have led thousands of volunteers over the past 5 years, planting over 250,000 native seedlings in and around Lake Claremont”.  Lake Claremont is part of an important green corridor that runs from Bold Park to Kings Park, nestled in the inner city suburbs, these small pockets of bushland provide important roosting and feeding sites for the Carnaby’s Cockatoo.

Conservation Volunteers Australia would like to sincerely thank our supporters and volunteers.  Without your support, CVA wouldn’t be able to make a difference to this important cause, as evidenced from the progress achieved these last three months, as support increases for this project, but we are not there yet… If you are able to donate again we would really appreciate it – every donation will help us to continue achieving these great conservation results and give these beautiful birds a better chance at coming back from the brink of extinction.  From all of us at Conservation Volunteers Australia we wish all of donors and supporters a very safe and happy Christmas, and a wonderful year to come in 2016.

Planting future food and nesting sites
Planting future food and nesting sites
The Amazing Red-tailed Black Cockatoo
The Amazing Red-tailed Black Cockatoo
Preparing for Planting
Preparing for Planting

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New habitat being planted by a dedicated volunteer
New habitat being planted by a dedicated volunteer

Welcome Friends of Cockatoo Conservation,

Over the last three months, teams from Conservation Volunteers Australia (CVA) have been donating their time and efforts, with your support, at various key locations in Perth that contribute to Carnaby’s Cockatoo conservationCarnaby’s Cockatoo is an iconic species, easily recognisable with its white tail and a ‘wee-low’ call as they migrate back and forth from the Swan Coastal Plain to the Western Australian wheatbelt – formerly their bushland home, meaning this species is fast running out of room. The Red-tailed Black Cockatoo is a subspecies of the red tailed black cockatoo found right across Australia. They too are running out of nesting room, with less old trees and hollows to call home.

Our teams of volunteers have been lending their efforts at a number of sites including Yanchep National Park, Bibra Lake, Canning River Regional Park, Lake Claremont and Yellagonga Regional Park. The three key elements of the work completed at these sites include revegetation and planting of Carnaby’s cockatoo food sources, rehabilitation of natural bushland areas and site maintenance and care. The activities offer the chance for community participation across the sites and help create awareness of the plight of not only the black cockatoos but wider environmental issues across those areas.

It’s been a busy three months, and we have been delighted to have more than 513 people volunteering at these project sites, made possible through your kind donations.  Collectively, over 50 teams of volunteers have removed 19,175m² of invasive weeds, planted 16,120 native seedlings and maintained 500m of trail.  As well as those amazing accomplishments, areas have been maintained in between planting and weeding times with the collection of 850kg of rubbish. Clearing rubbish and maintaining walking trails helps people to use natural areas and appreciate the beauty of the environment, including these beautiful cockatoos. Planting trees and clearing weeds is a step towards creating future habitats for the cockatoos and many other species that call this area home.

Friends of Lake Claremont Coordinator Heidi stated, “We are very grateful for all the extra help. It’s a great effort by all the volunteers and we are very appreciative of all their hard work.”

CVA would like to thank our Global Giving supporters.  Without your support, our dedicated volunteers wouldn’t be able to make a difference to this important cause.  If you are able to donate again we would really appreciate it – every donation will help us to continue achieving these great conservation results and give these beautiful birds a better chance at coming back from the brink of extinction.

The cockatoo's stunning backyard!
The cockatoo's stunning backyard!
Removing invasive weeds from Cockatoo habitat
Removing invasive weeds from Cockatoo habitat
Rubbish removal - an act of love!
Rubbish removal - an act of love!
Homes for the future
Homes for the future
Simply stunning - Carnabys Black Cockatoo
Simply stunning - Carnabys Black Cockatoo

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Student Volunteers enjoying "Cockie Love'
Student Volunteers enjoying "Cockie Love'

Dear Friends in Conservation,

Over the last three months, teams from Conservation Volunteers Australia (CVA) have been donating their time and efforts, with your support, at Kaarakin Black Cockatoo Conservation Centre.  Kaarakin was established in 2007 and is situated on 40 acres of bush land in Martin, in the Perth Foothills.   The centre is dedicated to the preservation of the black cockatoo and also to other native endangered Australian fauna. Projects at Kaarakin focus on the rescue, rehabilitation and if possible, the release of the threatened Forest Red-tail, and the endangered Carnaby's Black Cockatoos. The site is quite unique, being only 40 minutes from the centre of Perth, surrounded by Banyowla Conservation Park with excellent views over the coastal plain.

The three key elements of this project are the rescue and rehabilitation of injured cockatoos across the Swan Coastal Plain; the captive “Breed for Release” program; and habitat restoration projects on old cleared farmland situated on either side of the Kaarakin property. The project offers participation from the community across the site, and is creating vital awareness of the plight of not only the black cockatoos, but wider environmental issues across the planet.

It’s been a busy three months, and we have been delighted to welcome more than 127 volunteers at Kaarakin, including some unemployed individual and students from various schools.  Luisa Wing, State Manager for Conservation Volunteers in Western Australia, said, “It’s fantastic that so many volunteers are prepared to commit their time to help, matching the support made by our very generous donors! Together, we’re making real progress to help these beautiful birds – thank you to everyone who has contributed time and money to help so far.” The teams have removed an astounding 1,740m2 of invasive weeds, planted 171 native seedlings and maintained 80m of trail.  The teams have also been nursing the new seedlings through this dry period, with regular watering sessions, and have continued to undertake green stock maintenance on the existing native vegetation.  There has also been heavy involvement by volunteers in the maintenance of the kangaroo enclosure. All of these individual elements contribute to the long term plans to help increase the cockatoo’s habitat for the future.

Kaarakin environmental officer, Jill Stryk said, “I want to thank CVA for all your support for the past twelve months, for providing volunteers who have helped with the revegetation works both at the Turner Road site (mammoth effort) and revegetation/ground works at the Kaarakin site. Their help has been much appreciated.”

CVA, in turn, would like to thank our supporters.  Without your support, CVA wouldn’t be able to make a difference to this important cause.  If you are able to donate again we would really appreciate it (one great day to do this will be July 15th when Global Giving will provide a 30% match for donation, up to $1,000 per donor made on-line through Global Giving beginning at 9.00am until available funds are spent) – every donation will help us to continue achieving these great conservation results and give these beautiful birds a better chance at coming back from the brink of extinction. 

On behalf of the cockatoo’s whose cackles can be heard from these sites, thank you for your generous and ‘future proofing’ support.

Volunteers maintaining Kaarakin Centre
Volunteers maintaining Kaarakin Centre
Thanks everyone!
Thanks everyone!
Kaarakin Black Cockatoo Conservation Centre
Kaarakin Black Cockatoo Conservation Centre
Mmmm - Tasty Hair!
Mmmm - Tasty Hair!
Our Student Volunteers
Our Student Volunteers

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Carnaby's Black Cockatoo
Carnaby's Black Cockatoo

Over the last three months, teams from Conservation Volunteers Australia (CVA) have been donating their time and efforts, with your support, at Kaarakin Black Cockatoo Conservation Centre.  Kaarakin was established in 2007 and is situated on 40 acres of bush land and infrastructure in Martin, in the Perth Foothills.   The centre is dedicated to the preservation of the black cockatoo and also to other native endangered Australian fauna. Projects at Kaarakin focus on the rescue, rehabilitation and if possible, the release of the threatened Forest Red-tail, and the endangered Carnaby's Black Cockatoos. The site is quite unique, being only 40 minutes from the centre of Perth, surrounded by Banyowla Conservation Park with excellent views over the coastal plain.

The three key elements of this project are the rescue and rehabilitation of injured cockatoos across the Swan Coastal Plain; the captive “Breed for Release” program; and habitat restoration projects on old farmland situated adjacent to the Kaarakin property. The project offers the chance for community participation across the site and helps create awareness of the plight of not only the black cockatoos but wider environmental issues across the planet.

It’s been a busy three months, and we have been delighted to have more than 80 people volunteering at Kaarakin.  The teams have removed 1,830m2 of invasive weeds, planted 797 native seedlings and have repaired 20m of fence line.  The teams have also been getting the new seedlings through the summer heat with regular watering sessions and have continued to undertake green stock maintenance on the existing native vegetation. All of these projects contribute to the long term plans to help increase cockatoo habitat for the future.

Conservation Volunteers Australia Team Leader Nora Larry said, “It’s great for the volunteers to see the difference they are making over time at Kaarakin.  They are often rewarded for their efforts by visiting the friendly cockatoo aviary”.

CVA would like to thank our supporters and volunteers.  Without your support, CVA wouldn’t be able to make a difference to this important cause.  If you are able to donate again we would really appreciate it – every donation will help us to continue achieving these great conservation results and give these beautiful birds a better chance at coming back from the brink of extinction.

Volunteers Removing Weeds
Volunteers Removing Weeds
Volunteers Planting Native Seedlings
Volunteers Planting Native Seedlings

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Organization Information

Conservation Volunteers Australia

Location: Mount Pleasant, Victoria - Australia
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @CVAustralia
Project Leader:
Brett Atkins
Ballarat, Victoria Australia
$7,576 raised of $15,000 goal
 
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