School of Fun for Children in Fukushima

by Academy Camp
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School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima
School of Fun for Children in Fukushima

Project Report | Mar 19, 2024
Academy Camp 2024 Winter - Shouting AI in the Northwest of the Capital

By Kenji Saito | Representative Director

Dialogue on becoming somebody
Dialogue on becoming somebody

Please find a Japanese version of this report here.

On the second three-day weekend of February in Japan, we held a physical camp in Tokyo. Given that physical gatherings have already significantly recovered, the term "physical camp" might soon feel a bit out of place. The camp, conducted in the Northwest of the Capital, saw the participation of a total of 12 elementary, junior high, high school, and technical college students from the Tohoku, Kanto, and Tokai regions.

"Northwest of the Capital," as you may know, is the opening line of Waseda University's school song. Indeed, we held our camp for the first time on the campus of Waseda University. However, February being the entrance exam season, we actually entered the campus only on the last day and spent most of our time "next to Waseda" (this is a reference to the school song of the fictional Bakada ('fool' or 'idiot') University, featured in "Tensai Bakabon", a famous Japanese manga).

The theme of this camp was the creation of AI assistants. The children created artificial partners through dialogue with an AI chatbot to assist them in their daily lives, thereby testing a new learning system that will be implemented in some classes at Keio University and Waseda University, two of Japan's top private universities, starting this spring.

Initially, as a trial to test the system, the series of AI assistants created by the children were already impressive, with some capable of turning anything into a four-character idiom or generating quotations tailored to the person they were speaking to. Following this, a World Café-style dialogue was conducted on the camp's original theme: "Creating an AI assistant that helps you become somebody, not just anybody." Ideas were pollinated across tables, and one technical college student expressed surprise, saying, "I never thought I would learn the concept of 'meta-knowledge' from an elementary school student!"

The creations after the World Café were eye-opening. For instance, the "homework teacher" assistant is a rather simple example: give it any task, and instead of providing the answer, it offers hints for solving it. Other assistants were developed to provide a ray of hope in difficult situations, assist in creating new hobbies or pastimes from favorite things, or offer cheerful and positive responses to even the most lamentable circumstances. The children shared the brilliance of the assistants they had crafted during the poster & demo session.

On the last day, we welcomed 6-dim+, an actors' collective specializing in improvisational theater and comedy, for an in-person session that matched very well with what we have been doing, as we ventured together into improvisational theater after a long time. Firstly, the interaction with AI assistants is improvisational, and the act of stepping into an unknown future without a script closely mirrors the situation the children are in reality. We ended the three-day camp with lots of laughter, made promises to meet again (since we have another camp at the end of March!), and then we all returned to our respective places for the time being. 

Started with human-knot ice breaking activity
Started with human-knot ice breaking activity
After building AI assistants, had to make posters
After building AI assistants, had to make posters
Harder to summarize AI assistants than making them
Harder to summarize AI assistants than making them
Improvisation play with actors
Improvisation play with actors
Everybody did very well, including adults
Everybody did very well, including adults

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Organization Information

Academy Camp

Location: Fujisawa, Kanagawa - Japan
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @academy_camp
Project Leader:
Kenji Saito
Fujisawa , Kanagawa Japan
$185,277 raised of $300,000 goal
 
1,627 donations
$114,723 to go
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