Oct 15, 2012

Clean Drinking Water Arrives in Ahl Mbarek Maassoud

HAF's Project Manager Abderrahim Ouarghidi reports:

  • An important Clean Drinking Water project has been completed in the village of Ahl Mbarek Maassoud, Rural Commune of Aït Taleb, Ben Guerir Province:
  • The water tower has been built, the trenches for the pipes were dug, and pipes installed. This is a realization of a dream. Ever since 1979, this commune has requested clean drinking water, and HAF is happy that its facilitation of Participatory Planning meetings and process have enabled the community members to come together, solve the problems, and make it happen, despite the challenges mentioned in earlier reports.

Approximately 60% of rural Moroccans now have access to clean drinking water, up from 14% in 1995. During that same period, however, access to house connections and improved water sources had extremely modest gains. Clean drinking water projects remain a top project priority expressed by High Atlas Mountain communities. Nationally, infant mortality rates are 26.49 per 1,000 — more than 4 times higher than the United States — and are significantly higher in rural areas. Too often, there seems to be a disconnect, as in this case, between the national human development figures that show marked improvements, and the reality of Morocco’s mountain communities which have been left behind.

NOTE:
Time spent to procure what is often non-potable water (in addition to fuel wood) is a burden on women and girls — and prevents their participation in education. While a 2001 World Bank survey showed that girls’ enrollment in school increased 16% in communities that benefited from the installation of clean drinking water systems, interestingly, this project priority often does not appear among the suggested projects from the women's participatory planning meetings. One possible reason for this, as HAF has observed in a different community, is that the time spent fetching water is also an opportunity during the day for women and girls to socialize together.


 


Oct 14, 2012

Oct 2012 update from the field

Project and Training Manager Abderrahim Ouarghidi reports:

The remaining 8,000 olive trees in the Aarbat and Aabidat villages project (Ben Guerir) will soon be transplanted to their permanent homes.

Digging of the trenches (in which to install the drip watering system) has just been completed. As explained in an earlier report, this is particularly difficult work in such rocky, steep terrain. Wherever possible, a truck was brought in to dig, but wherever it was too steep to operate the truck, the villagers came out en masse to dig the rocky terrain manually. 

The painstaking digging has finally been completed, and as of last week, the trenches and 4 irrigation wells had been completely dug, as had the holes, which are now ready to receive the 8,000 transplanted trees after the drip system has been installed.

Once the materials arrive, the drip system will be installed in the trenches, at long last delivering water to the holes. In the meantime, the olive trees will continue to be cared for in their temporary homes until after the drip irrigation system has been completely installed, at which time they will be transplanted into the newly dug holes (their permanent homes) in the rocky terrain. 



Oct 14, 2012

Trenches Completed (in rocky, steep terrain)

Update from Abderrahim Ouarghidi, HAF's Project and Training Manager:

Digging of the trenches (in which the drip irrigation system will be installed) has just been completed. As explained in an earlier report, this is particularly difficult work in such rocky, steep terrain. Wherever possible, a truck was brought in to dig, but wherever it was too steep to operate the truck, the villagers came out en masse to dig manually. 

The painstaking digging has finally been completed, and as of last week, the trenches and 4 irrigation wells had been completely dug, as had the holes, which are now ready to receive the 8,000 transplanted trees after the drip system has been installed.

Once the materials arrive, the drip system will be installed in the trenches, at long last delivering water to the holes. In the meantime, the trees will continue to be cared for in their temporary homes until after the drip irrigation system has been completely installed, at which time they will be transplanted into the newly dug holes (their permanent homes) in the rocky terrain. 


 
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