CARE

Our mission is to serve individuals and families in the poorest communities in the world. Drawing strength from our global diversity, resources and experience, we promote innovative solutions and are advocates for global responsibility. We facilitate lasting change by: Strengthening capacity for self-help Providing economic opportunity Delivering relief in emergencies Influencing policy decisions at all levels Addressing discrimination in all its forms Guided by the aspirations of local communities, we pursue our mission with both excellence and compassion because the people whom we serve deserve nothing less.
Jan 23, 2007

Tsunami Two Year Report

The tsunami devastated eastern and southern coasts of Sri Lanka, killing at least 30,000 people and displacing more than half a million people. At least 100,000 homes were either partially or completely destroyed. Working in Sri Lanka since 1956, CARE’s tsunami recovery efforts are focused on the districts of Ampara, Batticaloa, Galle, Jaffna, Hambantota, Mullaitivu and Trincomalee, where we are helping some 160,000 people put their lives back together.

With the involvement of affected and neighboring communities, we built more than 1,700 high-quality transitional shelters that included water and sanitation facilities for some 7,700 people; some of those shelters were ready to be lived in one month after the tsunami. We distributed food and essential relief items to 32,000 families in the immediate aftermath of the disaster. Our efforts to provide clean water and proper latrines for 24,000 families have helped prevent disease and keep people healthy. With our continued support in the form of trainings, tools and equipment, and cash-for-work programs, some 11,000 families – including farmers, fishermen and small traders – have started to earn an income again.

Of the 1,330 houses CARE plans to rebuild, 361 have been completed and 665 are on hold due to ongoing conflict9 affecting Jaffna, Batticoloa, Trincolmalee and Killinochi/Mullaitivu, where all but lifesaving activities have been suspended due to security risks. While continuing to support the financial recovery of tsunami-affected families, CARE is also promoting their emotional recovery. More than 5,000 students, 4,500 parents and 200 teachers have benefited from CARE’s psychosocial program in schools.

To promote long-lasting change, CARE and other organizations have advocated for land and other legal rights for women, and set up a women’s coalition for disaster management and women’s action groups that empower women living in temporary camps to prevent and report violence. CARE also continues to advocate for a peaceful resolution to the current conflict, which is displacing and severely disrupting the lives of thousands of civilians.

Please read the complete report below for more information on CARE's tsunami response in Sri Lanka and other affected countries.


Attachments:
Jan 23, 2007

Tsunami Two Year Report

In Thailand, where CARE has worked since 1979, the tsunami claimed the lives of at least 5,000 people and affected more than 35,000 people across three provinces (Phang Nga, Krabie and Ranong). CARE has built permanent houses; helped vulnerable groups access basic health and education services; established 126 revolving loan funds, which are enabling some 34,075 people to access funds to repair or replace boats, fishing supplies, homes, etc.; provided marketing and business training to occupational groups; restored coral reefs and mangrove forests; and helped communities improve emergency preparedness.

CARE has organized a national conference on disaster risk management to be held in January 2007 for 200 participants representing 40 agencies – including community-level, government and private entities – to promote greater coordination of emergency preparedness and response activities in Thailand. We are also working with 30 villages to expand income opportunities through skills training to ensure that women especially have the means to support themselves. A recent survey of the districts where CARE operates concluded that 24 percent of households are not working, compared to 17 percent prior to the tsunami. Moreover, the number of households engaged in fishing since the tsunami has decreased from 19 to 14 percent. To help families find new ways to support themselves, CARE is setting up community occupational groups and equipping them with marketing and business training to establish/strengthen businesses related to fishing, batik, pillow making, baking, etc. Women comprise the majority of the more than 300 participants trained to date.

CARE is also advocating for the rights of vulnerable, marginalized groups such as undocumented migrant workers and unrecognized minority groups like the Moken (sea gypsies). Without the necessary documentation to prove their nationality and ownership of assets, these vulnerable groups are denied access to government compensation and services available to other tsunami survivors. Having lost their homes and sources of income, these stateless groups are in despair and experiencing increased signs of stress and chronic exhaustion. In response, CARE will train health workers and volunteers in the referral, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mental health disorders, and organize social activities for affected communities.

Read the complete report below for more information about CARE's response to the tsunami in Thailand and other affected countries.


Attachments:
Oct 17, 2006

One Year after the Earthquake

South Asia’s most devastating earthquake struck without warning on October 8, 2005. In minutes, nearly 87,000 people lay dead, and another 100,000 severely injured. Across 17,000 square miles the earth shook violently. Homes, schools, hospitals and roads vanished in an instant. The need was immediate and immense, but within hours, CARE was at work – formulating a plan for both quick relief and long-term recovery.

Measuring a powerful 7.6 on the Richter scale, the earthquake’s epicenter struck near Muzaffarabad — about 60 miles northeast of Pakistan’s capital, Islamabad. Although violent tremors were felt from Afghanistan in the west to India in the east, Pakistan suffered the brunt of the destruction. Most casualties occurred during the first minutes of the quake, but thousands more lost their lives in the following days as a result of severe injuries. As time passed, others succumbed to respiratory infections and other diseases. Of the survivors, more than 300,000 had sustained serious, life-threatening injuries, yet widespread damage to roads, bridges and hospitals made immediate emergency care all but impossible. Aftershocks rocked the area for days, causing further damage, and creating increased fear and uncertainty. All totaled, estimates place the cost of damage and reconstruction at more than $5 billion.

In India, where the earthquake’s devastation was less acute, more than 1,400 people lost their lives and nearly 200,000 survivors were left homeless. CARE’s response in India ended after the initial delivery of emergency supplies to more than 7,500 families. With your help, CARE was able to reach more than 37,500 people with immediate lifesaving relief in the worst-affected regions.

Leveraging support from private and institutional donors throughout the United States, CARE mounted a comprehensive relief and rehabilitation effort in the affected area. Your generous support is allowing our staff the flexible funding needed to ensure that earthquake-ravaged communities can rebuild their lives and livelihoods in the aftermath of this tremendous disaster. Details of our relief and recovery efforts in Pakistan, as well as plans for reconstruction, are described in the attached report.


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