CARE

Our mission is to serve individuals and families in the poorest communities in the world. Drawing strength from our global diversity, resources and experience, we promote innovative solutions and are advocates for global responsibility. We facilitate lasting change by: Strengthening capacity for self-help Providing economic opportunity Delivering relief in emergencies Influencing policy decisions at all levels Addressing discrimination in all its forms Guided by the aspirations of local communities, we pursue our mission with both excellence and compassion because the people whom we serve deserve nothing less.
Feb 11, 2014

Typhoon Haiyan: CARE's Progress in the Philippines

Immediately after the typhoon, CARE and our local partners responded with emergency relief to reach affected communities.

 Meanwhile, our supporters also responded. CARE   has raised over $20 million (USD) from private and institutional donors towards our emergency response and recovery efforts.

 Thanks to your generous support, CARE is now working with partners to deliver emergency relief in three areas of the Philippines: Leyte (20,000 households), Samar (10,000 households) and Panay (10,000 households).

 CARE's emergency response is focused on providing lifesaving food, shelter and Livelihood assistance, helping communities recover in the months and years to come. Overall, our relief operations are expected to reach 250,000 people.

 Since the storm first hit, CARE has reached more than 200,000 people. This includes:

185,000 people with food relief plus an additional 3,700 people with cash transfers to purchase food and CARE and our partners have delivered more than 1,115 metric tons of food.

36,000 people with emergency shelter supplies including tarpaulins, tools and kitchen sets.  Tarps distributed by CARE would cover the equivalent of 4,040 basketball courts - one of the most popular sports in the Philippines.

3,800 people with high quality shelter repair kits including  corrugated  metal  sheets, tools, specialized nails and other  items; an additional cash supplement for extra costs; and training on building back safer techniques

A long term approach

As Local markets open and food is more available in the communities, CARE will look to scale back our food distribution activities and shift our focus to livelihood support. The goal is to help people meet their own food needs and earn additional income in the months ahead.

The typhoon was devastating for Local Livelihoods.  Some 5.9 million workers in nine regions were affected, with their sources of income destroyed or disrupted. Of these, 2.6 million people have been identified as most vulnerable.

For example, the destruction of the coconut trees will have a serious impact on associated Livelihoods in the industry. More than 33 million of these trees were damaged or destroyed. It generally takes six to nine years for new coconut trees to become productive again.

According to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, Typhoon Haiyan also destroyed one third of the Philippines' rice growing areas- an important source of livelihoods and a staple food for the local community.

As many locals say, “It was Yolanda that took our harvest this year."

Working closely with our local partners, in the coming weeks CARE will begin assisting vulnerable families with financial support to restore such Livelihoods as vegetable farming, rice production, fishing and other income-generating activities. The goal of this programming will be to help families meet their basic needs, while earning additional income.

On behalf of the incredible, resilient people of the Philippines, thank you so much for your generous support of CARE’s relief efforts. 


Attachments:
Jan 15, 2013

Cycling Empowers Girls in India

Thanks to Global Giving community for your generous support of girls’ education in India.  I would like to share the story of Asmeena, a 12 year old girl in one of CARE India’s Udaan schools.  It might be very difficult for us to understand how sending their daughters to school is a very big act of courage for parents in Mewat because most of us have always taken education as an undeniable reality of our lives. But for Asmeena and many girls like her, the reality includes only the burden of household chores and sibling care. It is socially accepted that education for girls is irrelevant and unimportant.

Asmeena has, in many ways, challenged the boundaries that society has placed on her. Contrary to what is expected of girls in her community, she plays sports, rides a bicycle across the school campus and encourages other girls to study. It takes time and hard work to change the way people think and the only way it can be done is by showing the actual proof of education in the lives of their children. These baby steps that Asmeena is taking to study, to play and to express in more than one ways is actually a giant step in the transformation of her community.

To learn more about CARE’s work in India, please visit http://joinmyvillage.com/

Links:

Jan 15, 2013

Education Empowers Indian Girls

Thanks to Global Giving community for your generous support of girls’ education in India.  I would like to share the story of Asmeena, a 12 year old girl in one of CARE India’s Udaan schools.  It might be very difficult for us to understand how sending their daughters to school is a very big act of courage for parents in Mewat because most of us have always taken education as an undeniable reality of our lives. But for Asmeena and many girls like her, the reality includes only the burden of household chores and sibling care. It is socially accepted that education for girls is irrelevant and unimportant.

Asmeena, like many 12 year olds in a village in Mewat district of Haryana state, spent most of her days helping her mother with household work. There is a primary school in her village but she preferred staying home because most teachers in the school are men and her community doesn’t look very well upon girls being educated by male members of the community. Asmeena got another chance to study when CARE India brought Udaan to Mewat. She was one of the first few girls to be inducted in the school and while many girls have been going home and coming back, she has stayed in school without leaving except during holidays.

Asmeena has, in many ways, challenged the boundaries that society has placed on her. Contrary to what is expected of girls in her community, she plays sports, rides a bicycle across the school campus and encourages other girls to study. It takes time and hard work to change the way people think and the only way it can be done is by showing the actual proof of education in the lives of their children. These baby steps that Asmeena is taking to study, to play and to express in more than one ways is actually a giant step in the transformation of her community.

To learn more about CARE’s work in India, please visit http://joinmyvillage.com/

Links:

 

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