Jul 3, 2017

FGM Can End in One Generation: Youth insights

-HFAW Teresiah-when youth interact  with youth-th
-HFAW Teresiah-when youth interact with youth-th

FGM Can End in One Generation: Youth insights in our work

‘I have learnt that I have role in protecting my sister against FGM’ said one youth leader during one of our school outreach feedback session.

According to Population and Housing Census 2009, over 70% in Nyamira County are Youth aged between 18 to 35. The prevalence rates of FGM in NyamiraCounty stubbornly stand at 84% with drastic impact on youth and children. The practice of FGM as a culture has for a long time been passed from one generation to the next as a social norm in the community.

‘I will tell my friends from other schools about that we have been taught to say no to FGM and they should also not allow to be cut’ said Sarah* a pupil from Getri Primary school

Male youth have realized that they are potential consumers of both immediate and long-term effects of FGM. “I have no problem marrying a girl who is not “circumcised” said Momanyi. “But we have to guard against stigmatizing girls who have already gone through the cut”, he continued noting that it is not their fault.‘My place is very rural and remote, I now already feel like an Anti-FGM ambassador, my community needs to be reached with this information’ said Ruth who is a youth among trainees in social change communication skills to end FGM.

From our experience mentoring youth, we have discovered that they grasp issues easily and accept change rapidly. This has opened a window of opportunity to end FGM among youth between 18-35. These youth are in schools, at home, in youth groups and churches.

HFAW is successfully using Popular Education and the positive social change communication to end FGM with a special focus among the youth. HFAW has been able to reach over 5000 pupils who are under 18 years in over 10 schools within Borabu sub county, Nyamira County. Dialogue with youth has brought new energy and motivation in ending FGM. The process has been unveiling truths about FGM which were traditionally shielded in secrecy. Youth and children now also know how to prevent the incidences by reporting to relevant authority in schools and at home.

To increase the momentum of ending FGM by engaging more youth we recently launched a call to action initiative to train 50 Anti-FGM ambassadors in the entire Nyamira County. These youth will take lead in sharing the Anti-FGM messaging across the county. Youth also have an advantage of rapid use of social media among themselves and beyond. Their motivation to make their community safe spaces free of FGM is unparalleled. We invite you to invest in our youth by making a donation that will allow us train them as Anti-FGM ambassadors.

Training youth ambassadors is only possible because of donations from our esteemed supporters. We believe that this initiative is a game changer in ending FGM in Nyamira and Kenya. You have helped us raise $850 dollars. Training one youth will require a minimum of $250 dollars and if we can reach $5000 dollars we will begin to train our first 20 youths. Your donation counts in ending FGM in one generation. Share this information and make a request to your family and friends.

We thank you for your believe in our cause and our commitment to end FGM in Nyamira and Kenya

Mothers mentoring girls
Mothers mentoring girls
HFAW Agnes-Mentoring via friendship and laugh
HFAW Agnes-Mentoring via friendship and laugh
Ruth giving her story during a visit by GlobalGivi
Ruth giving her story during a visit by GlobalGivi
May 2, 2017

Courage and Confidence: FGM Survivor in Her Own Words

Gladys (right) at a KEWOPA FGM conference
Gladys (right) at a KEWOPA FGM conference

 ‘My name is Gladys Nyasuguta Nyariki from Borabu Sub County and this is my story, as an FGM survivor. For the longest time I had been quiet about the impact of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) on women including myself. I suffered a great deal in silence.

I went through this harmful practice at age 9. I later got married but had many difficulties giving birth. The doctors told me during the birth process of my first born that, my birth canal was not dilating as expected and that this was due to effects of the FGM I had undergone. My muscles were scarred and unable to naturally expand during birthing process. This forced the doctors to do a major episiotomy that could not heal for a very long time.

Back at home my own husband did not understand so we had a major problem in our intimate life. I had to deal with it myself since my husband did not understand me. The level of trauma and frustration was unbearable. The social stigma that came from community members because of my situation cannot be put to words. I was devastated.

However, asked the doctors to speak with my husband and explain that what was happening was not my fault but a situation arising from the FGM practice that I had undergone at my childhood. There was deep counseling from the doctors who explained to him the depth of the trauma, the physical and mental issues I was undergoing and what he needed to do to be supportive. Fortunately, he understood the situation and from then on was supportive. He even supported my schooling at Nairobi University to study FGM in relation to women’s health and community development.

After school, I was lucky to receive advocacy skills and training using Popular Education Model from Hope Foundation for African Women (www.hopefaw.org) and other community programs. The most recent one was Social Change Communication (SCC) skills to end FGM gained from a recent The Girl Generation (TGG), (www.thegirlgeneration.org) training.

I have also had big moments as I advocate for FGM eradication. Apart from being an Anti-FGM ambassador in my home ground schools, churches and market forums, this year alone I was invited to share my story at Kenya Women Parliamentarians (KEWOPA) regional conference in Nairobi with PLAN International. Recently, I was invited to share with council of elders at West Pokot on how to end FGM. I facilitated a declaration for them to identify the FGM as a major issue as well as create avenues for dialogue on the way forward to help the community abandon FGM. This gives me hope that a child will be saved from this practice and that FGM may end in one generation. Furthermore, now equipped with SCC skills of ‘Do No Harm’ as they have proved to be most effective, I feel more confident to continue advocating against the practice of FGM and that FGM can end in one generation.’

NB: Dear partners, Gladys’ story is just but one out of themore than 50 positive stories of change we have in our work, however, this could not have been possible without your support. Thank you!

Gladys with clan elders in West Pokot to EndFGM
Gladys with clan elders in West Pokot to EndFGM
Gladys at school outreach on FGM and child abuse
Gladys at school outreach on FGM and child abuse
Gladys with Anti-FGM messages at a market event
Gladys with Anti-FGM messages at a market event
Gladys during 2017 International Women
Gladys during 2017 International Women's Day
Gladys feedback during Popular Education training
Gladys feedback during Popular Education training
Feb 6, 2017

Poverty in Our Minds, Wealth in Our Hands

People are not passive recipients but active parti
People are not passive recipients but active parti

Dear Friends, Colleagues and supporters,

Towards the end of 2016, many participants in our finance literacy workshop with women majority were wearing a yellow HFAW t-shirt with words written on the back “Poverty in Our Minds, Wealth in Our Hands.” We were able to endorse kiva zip loans worth over $35,000 to our village women (including a few men), thanks to our friend and donor among you who introduced us to kiva zip Kenya. After a while we noticed that the businesses were not growing that much. We were so convinced that access to credits alone is not enough to ending poverty. 

Workshop facilitator, Carol, a middle aged woman who works in a local financial institution and speaks local language was invited to handle this topic in Kisii language using hands on methodology. As she emphasized the value of practicing saving, Gladys challenged her. “But Madam how is it possible to save? Our incomes are very low; we hardly are able to cater for our basic needs?  We are poor.” She stated.  Carol went on to state that “I see wealth all over you. I am from this region and I know each one of us is rich. Let me ask you something,” Carol continued. “What do you have in your garden”? She said bananas, “and what do you have in and around your home?”  She said the number of goats, cows, trees, chickens, and children and “I dig in my family garden,” Said Gladys.  Carol asked if there are participants in the room with similar or more things. Everybody raised their hands up. Gladys went on to argue that “those things do not make us rich. We have no school fees, medicine, and  money. Every day we wake up and struggle. The rich people are not like us.”

Carol went on to explain in simple terms issues concerning budgeting, savings, debt management and capital building including access to credits. Let us talk about budgeting. She asked Alice who rears chickens to explain how much money she invested and how much profit she has made so far. Alice explained that she just keeps buying chickens when she gets the money and sells them when she gets a customer. She might find a customer interested in eggs and she will sell. She will use the money in buying milk for the children. She confirmed that she has never kept a single record of anything. Carol explained how it is impossible to build wealth with random activities, no budgets and no planning.  It turns out that most activities ranging from agribusiness are considered way of life and is treated as “they come and go” without any seriousness.

Carol asked where the bananas go since everybody seems to have them, Agnes explained that just two weeks prior, “a relative visited from Nairobi and carried in her vehicle because in Nairobi there are no gardens and people seem to be buying everything.”, Then Carol walked them through some costing and it turns out the bananas, if sold could have earned  her Kenya shillings 10,000. That is equivalent of $100, money that is impossible to raise from women who earn a dollar a day.  The women seemed shocked. They asked who will buy their bananas since all villagers own their own bananas. Carol then explained that she could have connected with people in Nairobi and those bananas could have earned her perhaps 20,000 shillings ($200). The room went quiet with shock.

When Carol explained how women could save milk, maize, chickens etc. and save, Erick  complained. “Madam, do you want our wives to begin denying children milk so that they can sell and save? “Everybody laughed and applauded. Carol commended the man for his great question and explained how saving is possible without starving the children and the family. How many litres of milk do you harvest? Carol asked Joyce. Joyce said she only gets three a day. Is the cow well fed? Joyce said there is drought and there is no fodder. Did the cow get enough water? Was the cow inseminated by a vet nary doctor? And so many other questions that were important that no one was paying attention to. It turns out that Lawrence keeps only one cow but is able to harvest slightly more than 15 litres a day. “Lawrence can  you explain what you are doing to get more milk?. And he went into details of how he even keeps fodder during the rainy season and use during the dry spell. He explains that he has to sell all morning milk and everybody has more than enough to use from evening milking. There were rounds of applause in the room.

“Raise up your hand if you are here and know someone who harvests 15 litres of milk”, Carol requested.   Everybody raised their hands up. Story after story of how people took things for granted, misused or underused resources, never planned, never budgeted, had poor loan repayment record and did not even inform themselves where to sell products when they had plenty left everyone in the room thinking that they are poor.  Carol used discussion groups, and question and answer method as well as Manila paper work to make her points clear. She also used her own personal stories. “A few years ago, my husband passed on and left me with four children. I was desperate and felt poor. But that was a wakeup call for me. I have saved, I have budgeted and I have taken loans and repaid them. I am educating my children in good schools and I am never stopping. “She went on.  “I was inn worse situation than you are. You can do more than what I am doing.” She emphasized to a pin drop silence.

At the end of second day, people were emotional.” Madam, when we were invited to this training, we thought it was a waste of our time because such math education should be for the children, but now I am grateful” said Eucabeth. “You have spoken to our hearts and in a way we feel very sad how ignorant we have been.” She continued.

HFAW provides holistic program combining economic empowerment with self-driven community interventions by the community women themselves such as tackling GBV beginning with FGM. But HFAW understands that for transformative communities we need strategies that help people change their mindset. For economic empowerment to occur we must provide avenues for credits but women and communities have to learn how to budget, save, make effective loan repayments and build capital. They have to access mentors, learn to network and be able to develop strategies for real markets beyond their village. We have only taken the first step in unlocking one barrier to success and after just this one training we saw people thinking hard and wondering about things they often don’t think about. Karen emotionally expressed “For the first time, I know the meaning of these words on my T-shirt. Very true that poverty is in our mind, we have so much and we think we are poor.” She continued.

You have been with us from a distance when we began this journey. You helped us in training women to be community activist; then you linked us to kivazip loans through which they launched individual economic activities. You have been there when we have been doing various advocacies against FGM, child abuse and early pregnancies. Women have launched their own credit society to access credits and pay back. How can we forget you who have unwavering support and have even donated to the credit society? We wish you were physically present to witness the joy these women experience when they discover something so profound about themselves and when we share with them that you are their angels who support these projects. They know that none of these could be possible without your support.

We have now embarked on a schedule of finance and entrepreneurship literacy and agribusiness trainings, mentoring and technical support to be conducted through the 2017. All in addition to the continuing advocacy work against GBV especially FGM. We proudly welcome you to continue supporting us. Log on and give us your advice as well and how else we can do to address changing the poverty mindset. And thank you for believing in our cause.

With much gratitude

Grace Mose-Okongo

Carol in Blue captured their attention
Carol in Blue captured their attention
How can we save, we have low income
How can we save, we have low income
An environment for people to share ideas &experien
An environment for people to share ideas &experien
People learn more when they are having fun
People learn more when they are having fun
Effective group discussions
Effective group discussions
Poverty in our minds t-shirts/room full of activit
Poverty in our minds t-shirts/room full of activit
Kivazip certificate of appreciation of HFAW
Kivazip certificate of appreciation of HFAW

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