Will Howl for Food!

by Full Moon Farm, Inc.
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Will Howl for Food!
Will Howl for Food!
Will Howl for Food!
Will Howl for Food!
Will Howl for Food!
Will Howl for Food!
Will Howl for Food!
Will Howl for Food!
Will Howl for Food!
Will Howl for Food!
Will Howl for Food!
Rudy gets treats
Rudy gets treats

Three Tales of Two Tails

Adoptions of rescued animals require knowing the animals good points and bad points, interviewing adopters, home visits for required fencing and legalities and good old intuition. Here are three stories!

Tale: Three adoptions, two dogs, three homes, three states.

Tail 1: Meet Rudy – a gray stray with an attitude! Rudy got his name because he was “rude”. Crate reactive, fence reactive and leash reactive. He came to the farm needing full vet care, neutering and a ton of patience. Rudy decided who he liked and who he didn’t like and made those facts known with aplomb!

It was hit and miss with the volunteers, but I instinctively knew his “human” was out there waiting to adopt him. We listed Rudy on “Petfinder”, complete with all his flaws. There were quite a few inquiries about him, but none “felt” right. Then, Josh from TN wrote to me. I sent the application and requested pictures of his fencing, and crossed my fingers. Pics and application came back immediately and a request to meet Rudy. Fencing was 6 foot chain link and was the whole yard, not just an enclosure!

An appointment to meet was set and I checked references.

Meeting day: Josh came to meet Rudy and we explained his reactivity issues and let the magic happen. Josh was Rudy’s human! In 20 years I have never seen a dog so smitten with a person! We made arrangements to deliver Rudy to complete the home visit and adoption. Kismet!

Tail 2: Meet Phoenix – an older gentleman, shy and fearful. Phoenix too, like Rudy, was particular with his “friends”. No real bad habits like Rudy, but he was not going to be “Add collar, instant pet” either! We knew he was going to need patience and work.

Received an inquiry through “Petfinder” for Phoenix from a younger man who said he dreamed about him. Sent an application and requested fencing pictures. The fencing needed some work, so I contacted a friend and former rescuer to complete the home visit and make recommendations to bolster the fencing.  She explained to Shane that Phoenix was an older dog that was going to need some work and would not be an animal that would go to the pub or dog parks. The potential adopter said that was ok, Phoenix was the dog he wanted. Check references and made arrangements for Paulina to transport Phoenix to his new home. Introductions seemed to go well, so we let Phoenix stay. After two weeks, I received an email that Phoenix was howling and wouldn’t come in the house. My friend and former rescuer contacted Shane and offered to help work with him and Phoenix, but Shane never responded. Three and a half weeks later I got an email that he needed to return Phoenix, as it wasn’t working out.

Home checker, friend and former rescuer stepped up and arrangements were made to return Phoenix to FMF.

Tail 2.2: The day after Phoenix came back, I got an email from a friend, Robyn, to visit and talk. She had to give up her woofer in a custody battle, and was heartbroken. She needed a woofer fix. She came to visit, bringing treats for the animals. After hugs and treats dispensed, I asked her if she would like to work with Phoenix, who had just been returned. Well, it was love at first sight!

Robyn made many trips to the Farm to build up trust with Phoenix, and reinforced her fencing as needed. Phoenix has gone to his FOREVER HOME.

Josh: Rudy has given him “Renewable Happiness”.

Shane: Come and get him and I’ll try to take care of him until you get here.

Robyn: Phoenix has made my life complete again.

Thank you all for reading this story and for your continued support!

Joyous Howls from the Mountain

Nancy and the Pack

Rudy loves and trusts
Rudy loves and trusts
Rudy Happy Gotcha Day
Rudy Happy Gotcha Day
Phoenix at home
Phoenix at home
Phoenix is spoiled
Phoenix is spoiled
Phoenix going for a ride to the river to swim
Phoenix going for a ride to the river to swim

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Yicha and Theran
Yicha and Theran

Hello Supporters!

I am taking things to a different level this month. I have asked an adopter to write about her experience adopting a Full Moon Farm Alumni and what a difference, (if any) it has made in her life. She wrote a her story, and has started her own Wolfdog Rescue - known as Red Riding Hood Rescue Project, Inc. in Ohio. 

Joyous howls from the mountain, 

Nancy and the Pack

From Susan, adopter of Theran, a rescued wolfdog from Full Moon Farm, Inc.

********************************************************************************************************************************************

Rescue has changed the course of my life. It may sound glib but it is a fact. 

The adoption of Theran has created Red Riding Hood Rescue Project, Inc., an Ohio non-profit, with 501 (c ) (3) status pending!

 My life with wolfdogs started over 9 years ago when I said ‘yes’ to a chained up wolfdog with no social skills.  He was left behind on a vacant lot after his owner moved away. The mobile vet that was called to put him down sought help instead.  Were we qualified to say ‘Yes?’  No!  We were like so many uneducated people that end up with wolfdogs.  Porter came with 6 years of the type of problems that come with living on a chain and having no socialization. But 2 years later and lots of hard work paid off.  I learned so much along the way and he became my best, most loyal friend living to be 14.5 years old, and enjoyed a life rich in adventures!

 It was Porter who led me to a wolfdog group in my area and from there to Full Moon Farm.  When I rescued Theran, it was after I had already taken in a high content puppy to be Porter’s friend.  But as a senior citizen, an energetic female puppy was the last thing he wanted in his golden years.  Yicha loved him but Porter couldn’t get away from her fast enough.  So now I had a problem.  I had a lone senior citizen not wanting a friend, but now I also had a puppy desperately needing companionship.  So, what was the logical solution?  Get another wolfdog - a friend for the puppy.  And when I did, Nancy at FMF had just the right boy.  I struck gold with Theran.

 Theran’s adoption was remarkable for a couple of reasons.  He was not only the perfect best friend to my puppy; he was also a bridge to Porter.  (Theran was the only dog Porter tolerated, probably because Theran was a pen mate with another senior citizen, Glacier, who basically raised him.)  But it was also remarkable to see how committed Nancy was in bringing me this pup.  She and Kirby, (a volunteer), traveled 8 hours each way to deliver him.  They placed his crate in my enclosure and then watched the interest between Yicha and a crated Theran unfold and only when they were sure it was safe to do so, Theran was released from the crate to run and play with Yicha.  It was love at first sight.  After spending a few hours watching them get to know each other, Nancy and Kirby headed back to the Mountain. All in a day’s work!  Every detail was purposeful and thought through.  It was amazing to see the commitment to the animal throughout the entire process.  And now I had the perfect collection of friends: Yicha adored TheranTheran loved Yicha and respected Porter. And Porter accepted Theran. (Note here: Theran was altered and completely vetted and traveled with a USDA Interstate Health Certificate.)

 Theran enjoys quiet evenings sitting with me under the stars. He loves treats. He respects and understands his place in ‘the yard!’  He runs nicely with me in the morning.  He loves adventure walks in the evenings. I never thought I could feel for another the way I did Porter.  What I have come to learn, is that each animal is so exceptionally grand in their own way, that I am blessed with each of these unique relationships.

 I now understand that saying ‘yes’ to adopt an animal in need, is a contract  for the rest of their life.  It also means making personal sacrifices and being fine with those sacrifices.  I want to have happy, fulfilled animals. 

 The flood of animals needing rescue lately is alarming and so tragic for the innocent pup that finds itself on a euthanasia list through no fault of its own.  So my circle now is larger.  I am reaching beyond my own animals, beyond my own backyard, beyond my little Wolfdog community. I want to create a safe place for all the Therans of the world that I can help.  Nancy has created a name for herself that is respected throughout the community.  I want to continue that effort. I hope to do it as well.

 

Susan Vogt

Inspired by Theran


Theran by GB
Theran by GB
3-3-3 rule for rescues
3-3-3 rule for rescues

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Action Jackson aka Jax
Action Jackson aka Jax

For a very important date!

Yikes!

This newsletter has been 3 months in the making, so I hope you can/will forgive my delinquency.

What a year...

I wrote our last newsletter from the hospital, but I never disclosed that information. In fact, it was my first trip to the local hospital, Advent Health in Fletcher, NC. (Great people and great care!)

A tummy ache turned out to be diverticulitis. OUCH.

However, as so much of my life good comes from bad. I drove myself to the hospital with stomach pains and the ER ran a CT Scan to see what was going on. The diverticulitis was found, but so was a 7cm mass on my left kidney. I was shocked, as was everyone else that knew me. I had always been very healthy. I was sent home three days later with some antibiotics for the peritonitis that was going on. I made it about three days fighting a severe reaction to the antibiotics before my friends and neighbors took me back to Advent. I stayed a week that trip, coming home with a pic line for three weeks of IV antibiotic therapy and a referral to Wake Forest for surgery - kidney removal. The urologist was booked out for 8 weeks, but I was put on a standby list. I was able to be seen in three weeks and surgery was scheduled for the next week. The mass had grown .5cm in that short of time. Went from Stage 1, renal cell carcinoma to Stage 2. Cancer...

Once again, Terri and Paulina stepped up and I am grateful. I was able to have the much-needed surgery, a complete nephrectomy. The pathology came back as we suspected, but the margins were clear and all looked great as in textbook good! I have to have yearly follow up blood work, CT scan and chest x-rays forever. I recuperated for two weeks at my son's wonderful home in High Point. Back in the saddle in mid-October to go to MI for a high-profile court case on behalf of the defendants. 

And, once again, you, our donors, supporters and volunteers carried the torch in my absence. Thank you all.

We welcomed in Loki, Spirit, Jax, Zeal, Pretty Girl and Gage, said goodbye to River, Dodger, Bob, Rocky and Glacier. Loki, Hercules, Hiro, William and Rudy found their "forever homes", so we are currently at 39 animals with homes pending for two of our girls. :-) 

We are still in the market for a newer model AWD minivan to replace our Toyota Sienna and a UTV to replace our aging side x side. Please contact me if you have ideas! nancy@fullmoonfarm.org

Tropical Storm Fred caused tremendous damage to our driveway and undermined 3 culverts. Estimates have been higher than we had hoped. I requested help from FEMA, but was turned down since the property is leased to FMF although I am the owner. :-( So, I requested a grant from a foundation and we did a bit of fundraising. The work will start in December with the remaining balance to be covered by a generous donor. 

We have had a bit of press too! Please check us out in the links below.

Thanks for reading and for all your prayers and support.

Joyous howls from the mountain,

Nancy and the Pack

(PS - I took my birth name back on what would have been my father's 103rd birthday, hence the new name but same me!)

Old man Gage. 16 and still going strong.
Old man Gage. 16 and still going strong.
Zeal! Living up to his name.
Zeal! Living up to his name.

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From the President's Pen, (aka enclosure!)

Hello Everyone!

I know it has been way too long since an update from us, so here we are!


COVID 19 put a hurting on our donations, our events, our volunteer base and our ability to help more wolfdogs. Please consider donating and/or volunteering!  We need you!

Please note that we are solvent and holding our own, (current 990 forms available upon request). We are very thankful to our donors and to Tito's Vodka, for their generous grant. Paulina, worked wonders and got us set up with a super donation from Tito's Vodka, known as Vodka for Dog People!


"Do you love brands that support animal causes? Well, we have a vodka for you! Tito's Handmade Vodka found us on Instagram and is now a Full Moon Farm sponsor through their Vodka for Dog People program. Tito's goal is to better the lives of pets and their families far and wide. This contribution will help get the ball rolling on some of our bigger projects and the box of Tito's swag is going to make some cute wolfdog pictures! "
 
We are so thankful for their support and generosity, so please support Tito's!
 
We were blessed and had a 2019 Ford Transit 15 Passenger 350 donated to us! Arrrrrrooooooo! It will be going to have its windows tinted soon, as the summer sun is hot, even with air conditioning. Its maiden voyage was to take William, the GSD to meet his new trainer and daddy. Second transport was to get Derek and GiGi to their new homes in CA!
 
As the Universe is in charge, within days of the donation, our daily driver, a 2005 Toyota Sienna, 181,000 miles,  AWD decided to throw codes and the AC went out. We have limping along with a "sometime" code to the catalytic converter, (CA vehicle), and now the O2 sensor is coding. We need an AWD vehicle up on this mountain that can get to the vets in an emergency! 

So, we are on the hunt for a late model, low mileage Toyota Sienna AWD minivan, or a Chrysler AWD minivan, (only new this year I understand)! If you can help us find a deal or get one donated, that would be awesome!

And...

We are in need of 1 or 2 newer model camper trailers for intern housing.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
First one to replace is a 2000, 30' Dutchman that has a sagging floor among other problems. We bought carports last year to protect them, but it was too little too late. We are needing a 27' to 32' camper trailer. An 18" slide out will work, but nothing deeper.

Second would be to replace a 2005, 18' Pioneer that has been well used. Things are wearing out and it is cheaper to get a newer unit than to replace them.
 
Thank you for any and all considerations of 1 or 2 decent campers. I have been unable to strike a deal with every camper dealer within 200 miles. They do not want to donate or even discount! 

I have a fiduciary responsibility to YOU, my donors and supporters to get the most bang for your donated dollars. I am beating my head against the wall, and I refuse to pay what Joe Schmoe off the street will pay. Don't you agree?

We have had to say goodbye to a few seniors since I last wrote, and doing our best to keep Dodger, Sissy, Sheba and Mr. Toes happy with supplements and pain protocols.

We welcome back Sedna, fka "Teally Bean", one of the OH pups that her adopter lost her job and had to return her to us. 

DNA testing showed that Hercules has DM - Degenerative Myelopathy, and he is already suffering mobility issues. He is two years old and should have never been bred. Also, Bosco has Degenerative Disc Disease, but has not presented any problems to date. With these two, and our senior population, our veterinary costs are on the upswing. Your donations keep these wolfdogs healthy, happy and in reduced pain. 

I would like to take a minute and publicly thank Terri Wallace, (my right-hand animal person), and Paulina Romanelli, (my right-hand media person), for their dedication to these animals and to Full Moon Farm. I could not do it without them. A tip of the hat to Dr. Beverly Hargus and Animals R Us Veterinary Clinic and to Jenna and her crew at Patton Avenue Pet Company for their discounts and great customer service. 

As I am approaching my 20th Anniversary in Wolfdog Rescue and my 65th birthday, I am humbled by the generosity, the friendships and the blessings of you, the friends and supporters of Full Moon Farm, Inc. I could not have done it without you.

Joyous howls,

Nancy

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The beginning
The beginning

For something different this report, I asked "adopters" to write a story about their animal.

I offer the following Love Story.

“The Ace of Hearts” 

                                                                      By: Amanda and John R. Allen 

 

 

If our furry friends could speak our language, I am most certain they would have a story or two to tell. Like us they hunger, they love, they connect, and can be let down and failed by the humans that were supposed to love and protect them. However, when their stories are told, they are told by us, by those who have sworn to keep them safe. Sometimes they find more than more than just a meal, and a warm bed at the end of their rescue. Sometimes they find all the love they need. They find family. They find their heart. And this is one of those true success stories, from chains to couches.  

It started with a roadside zoo. Ace’s mother was a mid content wolfdog bred to a higher content coydog. The pups were supposed to be cool display animals. The pregnant mother was then sold to an eighteen-year-old, with no prior experience in dealing with such an animal to make room for more of the man's big cats. Once the mother gave birth, her pups were given away to the kid’s high school buddies. Other than Ace, the rest of his brothers and sisters didn’t fare so well. In each of their attempts to escape their new homes, sadly, they didn’t make it. Ironically Ace only survived due to being chained and confined in the barn. 

It was August of 2014 when Amanda Allen was contacted. As an advanced EMT, she had been working a 24-hour shift when a coworker reached out. That friend had explained that a friend of theirs had recently moved into a new house. Along with the house, there was an existing barn. The people who had just moved in had found something unusual. Chained to the rafters of the barn was what they claimed to be a wolf/coyote/dog. In similar cases it isn’t a “wolfdog,” but merely a husky mix. Other than the people that are dedicated to rescuing these particular animals, and the ones that take them in or own/breed them, most couldn’t tell the difference between a husky and a wolf.  

Amanda, however, had some experience considering the fact that she had two low content wolfdogs of her own. And with this her coworker thought she would be someone to contact. She was someone that would know what to do. When she had visited the barn to take pictures, it was with that visit that she discovered what we now know to be a true mid content coydog, wolfdog cross.  

The situation was deplorable. Living in an old barn run down by time, he picked through a bowl of molded food. And what water could be found had grown a thick film of what could be aptly described as “green muck.” However, the conditions and the fear he exhibited said enough. Amanda’s first thought was that he needed to be removed from that situation. And her second thought was how somebody could leave him there like that. She took him home the next morning after finishing another shift. And from there “Ace” began his new life. 

Full Moon Farm quickly sprang into action, giving Ace an evaluation and medical care. Amanda intended to take him in temporarily. He was only supposed to be a foster while Full Moon Farm searched for another placement. Amanda and Ace quickly decided that his home was with her. Amanda entered a lifetime foster agreement with Full Moon Farm 

His first two days with Amanda he would not come out of his kennel. Ace was completely shut down and was completely “broken.” He had to have a reinforced kennel built. It became a small enclosure inside Amanda’s dining room. He spent a lot of time in there. It was his safe place, as he was terribly afraid of just about everything. Outside was frightening for poor Ace. The snow, rain, and even the wind, scared him to death. He was around six months old. His socialization windows were pretty much closed, resulting in him being almost feral. It was within the first year of his stay at Amanda’s that he needed the most attention and care. He still does to this day, but at that time it was imperative for a sustained wellbeing. 

Also, within that first year, he was getting accustomed to normal canine manners. Ace was getting used to being on a leash, human touch, and even walking in the grass. But even with these small strides, there was still some work to be done. He was reactive to everything. Traffic, people shouting, and noises associated with urban life. He couldn’t be trusted around small children because of the high-pitched noises children often make. Children set off his prey drive. He viewed them as a “toy” that needed the “squeaker” removed. His first year was filled with reactive fear nips, whirlwinds of fear poop, and carrying him almost everywhere. 

Amanda was taking him to Full Moon Farms periodically where Nancy Brown aided in his behavioral modification. He had been destructive all around. Ace jumped on counter tops and stove hoods. He ate couches and destroyed other pieces of furniture. All attempts to correct the behavior were very slow going. But with help from Nancy Brown, love, patience, trust, and special accommodations in the home, he started improving. 

Although his temperament was better, he still had a fear of men specifically. However, I am proud to say that when I met him three years ago, I became one of the only men he has liked. It safe to say that he has gone so far as to love me. But it was with Amanda that he hyper bonded. She refers to him to this day as her “heart dog.” She sees him as her child. And to him, she is all the mother he will ever need.  

In the last three years he has grown immensely. Ace was slightly apprehensive. But he took to me pretty quickly. Nowadays, he highly enjoys my company. He takes pleasure in me scratching behind his ears and under his chin.  Again, if he could speak, I bet he would tell you that he surely doesn’t mind his nightly back rubs.  

He sure has come a long way. Ace has blossomed into a regular social butterfly, taking trips to the park, and greeting strangers on his walks. Which before would’ve have resulted in fear pooping or peeing. Amanda is so proud of how much he has improved within the last three years. During our wedding, which took place at our house, he stole the show. Ace was social, playful, and engaged. He showed no fear of a guest list of fifty or more people. He now spends his days lounging on couches rather than devouring them, and finds enjoyment in almost everything.  

The two biggest hurdles that he had left, he has jumped this year. It has been proven to be as natural for him as chasing the possums up our tree. It was for the first time that he has played in the snow, frolicking, rolling, and making his version of snow angels. He also has found love for a small child. The undying affection for a little girl, our granddaughter. It all comes down to love. The love he has been given, and the love he has given back. He is adored by everyone. And just as Amanda had won his heart, he has won all of ours. He’s definitely the Ace of hearts. 

The chain
The chain
Ace and Amanda
Ace and Amanda
Ace relaxing
Ace relaxing
Ace wears pajamas
Ace wears pajamas
Ace with John
Ace with John
Happy Ace
Happy Ace
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Organization Information

Full Moon Farm, Inc.

Location: Black Mountain, NC - USA
Website:
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Project Leader:
Nancy LaPorta
President
Black Mountain, NC United States
$44,201 raised of $50,000 goal
 
948 donations
$5,799 to go
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