Ducks & Geese Need You! Be a Waterfowl Warrior!

by Pacific Waterfowl Rescue
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Ducks & Geese Need You!  Be a Waterfowl Warrior!
Fern
Fern

What are the chances of receiving two pekin ducklings from different parks on the same day, each with a broken leg? Well, that is exactly what happened to us. Read their stories below! 

Fern 

Fern was rescued by Judy from  a park in Sacramento with a fracture and dislocation of the right femur. Judy took her to a local veterinarian where she was splinted. Judy also rescued Fern's two friends, a pekin and a runner. All three were just young ducklings and had been dumped at the lake the night prior. Fern was then taken to Medical Center For Birds for evaluation of her femur with hopes it could be repaired surgically. Unfortunately, her injury was such that it could not be repaired. She was placed in soft hobbles for 2 weeks and they dramatically improved her ability to walk. Fern is also all grown up now and she is thriving at Pasquetti's Animal Resort, our second rescue location in Sacramento.  

Dallas

Dallas came from a park in Concord with a compound fracture of the left leg. We don't know what happened but we are very grateful to Gretchen who found him, took him home, and contacted us for help. She transported him to Medical Center For Birds where it was initally thought he would need complex surgery to repair the leg. The leg wounds were cleaned extensively and the fracture was splinted. He was started on anti-inflammatories until the swelling went down. Lo and behold a few days later, the fracture had already started healing and after a veterinarian pow wow, they decided he did not need surgery after all. Being a very young duck, they believed he would heal fully without surgery. Today, Dallas is fully grown and he doesn't even have a limp. He is one lucky dude and we are so glad we could help him. 

We are so thankful to all of you who continue to support our birds. Current times are difficult and while the rescue has felt the effects with a decrease in donations, we are confident that we can continue our work to save the lives of dumped ducks and geese. We send our positive thoughts of love and peace to all of you. 

Dallas
Dallas

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Max with his doctor, Dr. Fitzgerald
Max with his doctor, Dr. Fitzgerald

Wow!, Time flies and we are late with our project update. Since our last update, we have taken in 14 new birds. I'd like to introduce you to three that have received veterinary care and are now healthy and enjoying life, all because of your support as Waterfowl Warriors on our team! 

Max is a Runner hybrid that was turned in as a stray to the shelter. Volunteers were able to pick him up and get him to Medical Center For Birds for treatment. He was malnourished, exhibited balance problems, had bumblefoot, a wing injury, and dirty, crusty eyes. He was hospitalized for x-rays, blood work, and treatment. Thankfully, he did not have a neurologic condition as his balance has returned. He was treated for a parasitic condition, bumblefoot, and his weight began climbing up on good nutrition. Max pals around with his friend Ming Ming, a pekin duck. 

Martinez, or Tina was another shelter bird. She is a Chinese goose and came from the Martinez Shelter in Antioch and the shelter veterinarian called us asking if we would take her due to an infection in her mouth and some tears in the skin of the jaw. Dr. Baden was able to clean out chuncks of debris from underneath her tongue and placed her on antibiotics. She was also malnourished because her injury wouldn't allow her to eat properly. She later received surgery to repair the tears in her lower jaw and lift her tongue back up in a more normal position. Tina has become friends with Emily here at the rescue and she is doing great. If left in the wild, she would have died from her condition. 

Mel is a Chinese gander and was a victim of fish hooks. He had a fishing luer stuck in the corner of his mouth and a large treble hook stuck in the skin near his shoulder. A concerned woman from the park notified us and we met up with Harvest Home Animal Sanctuary to rescue him as well as a few other birds that were doing poorly. All of these birds had been abandoned by people who believe that dumping their pets at the lake is acceptable. It is not and we will continue to educate the public that dumping domestic ducks and geese in public areas is a death sentence. Mel was treated by our local veterinarian who sedated him and removed the hooks. He had a 10-day course of antibiotics and he enjoys running around with his buddy, Jackson, who was rescued from the same park. 

We would like to give special mention to Sparky, a much loved goose from Los Medranos College pond. A volunteer got her to Medical Center For Birds but her condition was untreatable. Sparky was at least 18 years old and had quite the following of people who loved her. 

We thank you for being a part of the #WaterfowlWarrior journey. We could not do this without you. 

Tina (Martinez)
Tina (Martinez)
Mel and his buddy, Jackson #bestfriends
Mel and his buddy, Jackson #bestfriends
Sparky with his rescuer, Susan
Sparky with his rescuer, Susan

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Mazie
Mazie

In August of last year, we took in little Mazie, a call duck that had been surrendered to Medical Center For Birds. She was positive for pneumonia and was on antibiotics as well as an anti-fungal for aspergillosis. After over 4 months of treatment, her medications were discontinued and she was declared healthy! 

In January of this year, she was checked by Dr. Speer as we had a potential adopter for her. She received a clean bill of health and went to live with a flock of call ducks to see if she would fit in with the group. Our foster noticed that Mazie had a lot of poop caked around her vent and inspected her to clean it up. She found large scabs with bloody skin underneath. Upon physicial exam, Dr. Speer found that Mazie was missing the lower half of her vent as well as a large amount of necrotic skin and tisse on her abdomen. While being treated for this, her respiratory condition returned with semi-labored breathing.

Mazie's breathing improved and Dr. Speer took her to surgery to reconstruct the vent and skin. Mazie went into respiratory distress, coughed up a large chunk, and surgery was immediately halted. That chunk was cultured and sure enough, the asper was confirmed again. Once a bird has been diagnosed with asper, any kind of stress can cause it to return.  

Since then, Mazie has been hospitalized on antibiotics, anti-fungals, and twice daily nebulizer treatments. She is also receiving medicated ointment to her vent and abdomen to prevent further damage. 

Lorraine was able to visit Mazie last week and was encouraged to see her progress. She was bright, quacking loudly, and her feathers looked healthy. 

Mazie's medical care is costing about $110 a day right now. We want what's best for her and are committed to support her march to full recovery. 

We truly appreciate you and your donations. Mazie is in need for donations and she can use any extra support that you can provide for her. She is a sweet, sassy girl!

Will you march for Mazie too?

Sassy girl!
Sassy girl!
Getting better
Getting better
In the nebulizer tub
In the nebulizer tub

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Butterbean has become quite the celebrity here at Pacific Waterfowl Rescue. From his early diagnosis of a testicular tumor, to a bumblefoot infection that became septic arthritis with the inability to walk, episodic E.coli gastrointestinal infections, and testicular surgery, he has triumphed over all! 

Just yesterday, he took steps on his own! Watch the video here

At Butterbean's recheck visit this week, Dr. Speer stated he thought a minor orthopedic procedure could help him walk even better! We are excited about the possibilities once he is fully healed from surgery and has gained more strength. The best news of all is that there is NO cancer, an amazing discovery as the majority of testicular tumors in watefowl are cancer. 

Butterbean's veterinary expenses have been very high and thanks to you and other donors, we have been able to support him financially. 

We are very grateful for your support and Butterbean sends his Quacking Thanks! 

Thank you for being a #WaterfowlWarrior! 


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Rigley Love
Rigley Love

This last March, an employee of a feed store contacted one of our board members to let her know that someone had returned a duckling and the duckling had a severely twisted neck. We soon realized that the little baby had Wry Neck, a neurological condition that causes twisting of the neck and depending on the severity, the bird may not be able to stand, eat, or balance. It can be caused by a nutritional deficiency, head injury, genetic abnormality, or by ingesting toxins.

We named the little baby, Rigley.

We quickly got Rigley to Medical Center For Birds the next day. Dr. Olsen assessed him and due to several positive Wry Neck cases in the past, he was confident that Rigley could beat it. Rigley was treated with medication and vitamin injections. 

Rigley went to live with a volunteer where he gots lots of love, attention, and physical therapy. Rigley grew, enjoyed eating and drinking, and snuggling with his foster mom. He began to improve slowly and even learned to walk a few steps on his own. Rigley delighted every person he met. He had a sparkle in his eye and a zest for life. 

Two weeks later, Rigley woke up lethargic and weak. He died in his foster mom's arms very peacefully, It was very sudden and we were shocked as Rigley had been doing so well. 

Your donations had a positive impact on Rigley's life. Even though short, Rigley had a chance and he experienced love. He touched our lives and placed an imprint on our hearts. 

Baby Rigley
Baby Rigley
Look! I'm growing!
Look! I'm growing!
I can balance!
I can balance!

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Organization Information

Pacific Waterfowl Rescue

Location: Tehachapi, CA - USA
Facebook: Facebook Page
Project Leader:
Pacific Waterfowl
Tehachapi, CA United States
$27,008 raised of $50,000 goal
 
567 donations
$22,992 to go
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