Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq

by RED International
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
Relief for 1900 displaced families - Northern Iraq
A family receiving their hygiene kit
A family receiving their hygiene kit

Thanks to your support, RED International’s partner in Iraq, Operation Mercy (OPM) conducted 6 hygiene kit distributions over a period of 8 months in camp Domiz 2. They wanted to improve the hygiene conditions of the 1895 families (8531 individuals) who find themselves displaced in Northern Iraq. On average 1799 families showed up for each distribution.

Many beneficiaries shared with OPM that the project helped them as their meagre income is supplemented by these hygiene products. One mother shared that receiving toothbrushes on every distribution helped her to regularly change the toothbrushes for her children, which she otherwise wouldn’t have done.

Zahra* comes from Hasakeh and fled Syria all by herself and got married in Iraq. She is living with her husband now in Domiz 2 and dreams of becoming a teacher at a primary school. She expressed her gratefulness to OPM as now that she receives the hygiene products she is able to spend her money on other needed items.

There were four objectives to the project:

1) To meet urgent material needs to contribute to an improvement of the hygiene conditions. The target was that 90% of the families would receive six times out of the six distributions. The distributions were spread out over eight months. The camp is divided into three sections: Adar, Gulan and Harem. Of Adar 86%, of Gulan 88% and of Harem 60% of the families received all the six distributions.

There are several reasons why the target hasn’t been reached. Families were not always informed well by the leaders of the camp that a distribution was happening, many mentioned that they were not present because of medical appointments and travels, in Harem many houses were vacant at the beginning of the project and lastly many families were moving in and out the camp.

2) To empower the community by involving the community in the distribution process.

 Before OPM started the distribution several women and men from the camp were asked about their situation, what their needs are, and which services they would receive. Then they were consulted about which hygiene products were most needed. Based on their outcome nine products were chosen. During the second distribution OPM conducted a product survey with 58 women and based on this the number of some of the products distributed was changed. Halfway the project 42 families were visited in their homes to get their feedback about the distribution in general.

3 & 4) To employ local staff for distributions with the aim to build their capacity in multiple ways, like increasing their skills in organizing distribution systems, increasing their monitoring and evaluation skills and growing their acceptance of other people groups.

OPM employed two extra local staff to help the two Project Coordinators and invested in those four employees through basic training in order to improve the skills needed for the project. They were debriefed after the first 3 distributions. Furthermore, OPM conducted a leadership training and started mentoring them. Unfortunately, two of the distribution staff left OPM during the project. OPM employed day-labourers that assisted with packaging, registration and distribution from the camp itself. In total 126 different men and women were employed at least once and around one third of them was employed multiple times. Fifteen day-labourers that assisted during the distribution days, received a training in registration and OPM values.

OPM conducted two other projects in Domiz 2, one on mobility and another on women's empowerment. The layering of these projects in the same location enhanced the touches with the local community and had a larger impact on several individuals.

Many beneficiaries shared they were treated with respect and kindness by OPM staff on distribution days. Quite a few people specifically mentioned on the evaluation that they were welcomed by many smiles.

Fatma* is married and has two daughters. She loves her family but her life isn’t easy. Like all her neighbours she is a refugee, but on top of that, her husband has a handicap and can hardly walk. This means she needs to provide for her family on top of caring for her family and household. She was always asking God “Why me? Why do I need to suffer this much?” And she kept comparing herself with others. Then one day, OPM asked her to come work for them during the distributions. Without hesitation, she started to work. Although it was not much work, it still supplied some income. Simultaneously the OPM mobility started to visit her husband to see how his life could be improved. A few months later she became part of the OPM Shine project where she was told she is valuable, no matter who you are and what your circumstances are. During this program, her self-perspective changed completely; she has been comparing herself way less with others and started to believe that she is valuable. OPM staff that work with her during the distributions can tell she has changed by just looking at her face.

Due to the success of the distribution in Domiz 2 between February to September 2017 and ongoing need for hygiene kits, Operation Mercy has decided to continue the project for another 6 months.

*names changed

 

Sadly, RED International will cease operations from the end of 2017. However, Operation Mercy successfully completed the process of joining GlobalGiving in September and now have their own project pages.

The Northern Iraq Relief Project will move Over to Operation Mercy and the RED International page will close. We are very grateful for all the support you have giving to this project over the last three years. The needs in Northern Iraq are still increadibly great and so we would encourage you to please consider continuing to support the work done by the Operation Mercy team there in Northern Iraq especially in December.

To continue to support the relief work in the refugee camps please follow the link below.

https://www.globalgiving.org/projects/relief-for-1900-displaced-families-northern-iraq

Thank you so much for helping this individuals and families to find hope and a way forward in such challenging circumstances. Please do continue to follow their progress through the new link to the project.

You can see all of Operation Mercy's Projects with GlobalGiving here https://www.globalgiving.org/donate/42851/operation-mercy/

RED International owes the greatest debt of gratitude to all those individuals and organisations who have supported projects over the last 12 years through donations and sponsored events. The funds which have been given to support many different projects have made a lasting impact on transforming lives and communities among the poor and marginalised. RED International and our partners want to thank all those who have joined with us to make this possible.

Thank you for your faithful support of this project through RED International over the last few years. Please continue to support the project through the new Operation Mercy Project Page and also share this with your friends and networks and encourage them to give before the end of 2017.

https://www.globalgiving.org/projects/relief-for-1900-displaced-families-northern-iraq

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Giving out hygiene products continues to be vital
Giving out hygiene products continues to be vital

Buckets of love come in many forms.

Thanks to your support, in July RED International's partner in Iraq, Operation Mercy, distributed hygiene items to 1799 Syrian families in Domiz 2. Many families expressed their gratitude and told the staff of Operation Mercy how great it was that everyone received help instead of just a part of the population. Around 35 Syrians were also hired for the registration, packaging and distribution process. Including local people in the process provides value and ownership to individuals and the community.

We are also very grateful for the support this project has received through a grant from the GlobalGiving Syrian Refugee fund in April 2017.

As need continues more relief is scheduled to be delivered from August 31st. Thank you for helping to make such widespread distributions like these possible. 

Please share this with your friends and families so more people can be given an opportunity of surviving this difficult time and starting a new life.

Buckets of love comes in many forms
Buckets of love comes in many forms
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

Thanks to generous support from donors around the world, RED International’s partner, Operation Mercy (OPM), has distributed hygiene kits 3 times to the Syrian Refugees in Domiz 2 Camp, Northern Iraq.

In February, distribution #1, hygiene kits were distributed to 1761 families.
In March, distribution #2, hygiene kits were distributed to 1810 families.
In April, distribution #3, hygiene kits were distributed to 1823 families.
On May 25th OPM will distribute hygiene kits again.

Around 75 men and women have been employed as day labourers for 1-4 days helping out with packaging the items, registration of beneficiaries, distributing the items and conducting evaluations among the beneficiaries. The beneficiaries have been really satisfied as all of them (instead of just a targeted group) have received hygiene kits and many mentioned that they felt respected by OPM staff during the distribution.

Alongside the hygiene distribution project, OPM has also been working with pregnant women and infants. The World Health Organization recommends that “infants should be exclusively breastfed for the first six months of life to achieve optimal growth, development and health. Thereafter, to meet their evolving nutritional requirements, infants should receive nutritionally adequate and safe complementary foods while breastfeeding continues for up to two years of age or beyond.”

According to Nurture Project International, an international NGO specializing in care for refugee mothers and babies, “Approximately a fifth of all deaths among children under 5 years in the developing world could be prevented through safe infant feeding practices. Infants fewer than six months old who are not breastfed in non-emergency situations are already more than 14 times more likely to die from all causes than are exclusively breastfed children. These risks are amplified in emergency situations and mortality rates are often greatly elevated.”

Operation Mercy, has been operating a pregnancy and lactation support project in Domiz I refugee camp since September 2016 with the following goals:

1) To increase support systems for refugee women who are pregnant and/or lactating in the refugee camps

2) To provide training to key local staff members of the Dohuk Department of Health that provide direct care to women in the camps, in order to address commonly-identified barriers to breastfeeding.

Breastfeeding does more than just support physical health for mother and baby; it is a holistic lifeline in times of crisis, laying down foundations of attachment and emotional resilience that stretch years into the future. In the words of one mother in Domiz 1 who was supported by our project, “I cried the last two nights when I thought my baby didn’t want my milk… but now, when I put her skin-to-skin and look into her eyes, I just feel so happy.”

The Pregnancy and Lactation Support project has had a rare opportunity to address all five areas of Operation Mercy’s core competencies simultaneously: empowering women, improving health, caring for children at risk, equipping the next generation, and responding to crisis. OPM has been honoured to play a role in this vital work. All these qualities fit with RED International’s goals and our vision to support women and children through the 1000 days initative. If you would like to know follow the link below.

Thank you for helping to bring health and hygiene to so many families in Northern Iraq through RED International and its partner. Lives are transformed thanks to your support.

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Do you feed your family or keep them clean?
Do you feed your family or keep them clean?

Imagine having to choose between toilet roll, toothpaste or food.

Syrians living in refugee camp settings with little income, have to put hygiene materials as a second priority to food even though they may live in an unsanitary situation. Even though they may acknowledge that hygiene is vital their priority must be on the survival of their families. Without the materials necessary for hygiene, families’ health suffers, and the distribution of hygiene kits can curtail that. RED International's partner, Operation Mercy (OPM) has been working in Domiz. They now hope to distribute a hygiene kit to every family in Domiz 2 between February and July 2017. Currently 1891 families / 8808 individuals reside in Domiz 2. This distribution alleviates the need for families to spend their meagre incomes on hygiene products and instead they can purchase food and other necessities

OPM has been made aware of a current gap in the distribution of hygiene materials to refugees living in Domiz 2 camp, a camp built to help meet the overwhelming needs present in Domiz 1, the largest Syrian refugee camp in Iraq. Therefore Domiz 2 has a higher percentage of particularly vulnerable families with disabled, widows, orphans, and sick. Other international NGOs that were previously providing hygiene kit support to Domiz 2 have had their funding re-allocated focusing on the current offensive on Mosul.

OPM are interested in doing the same hygiene project in a camp with Internally Displaced Peoples (IDPs) from Mosul as they are doing now in Domiz 2, however they will only start that process if enough funds are coming in, as it would mean another US$100-200,000.

They have been able to help the Shekhan hospital in Ninewa province which lacked necessary operating equipment to sufficiently help those injured fleeing from and fighting on behalf of Mosul, both civilians and Peshmerga (Kurdish military). The Department of Health Dohuk requested assistance to furnish these operating theatres for three reasons:

  1. Shekhan is closer to Mosul so patients can get their faster to receive urgent surgeries.
  2. This provides a closer place for IDP’s in nearby camps such as Garmawa, Nargizlia and Keimawa to receive needed medical attention without having to go to Dohuk and put strain on the already overburdened emergency hospital there.
  3. There are security concerns for people fleeing Mosul to enter the Dohuk province so it is better to have a viable treatment option in Ninewa Province.

Therefore, OPM contributed towards furnishing the third operation theatre with an OT table, anaesthesia machine, suction device, vital signs monitor and electrocautery machine to increase the capacity of Shekhan hospital.

Thank you again for your support of RED International and Operation Mercy. Only together can we respond to the ongoing critical needs of refugees and internally displaced families and partner with them to build hope for their future. Please share these updates with your friends and think of them next time you grab your toilet roll or tooth brush.

Crowds gathering at Domiz camp
Crowds gathering at Domiz camp
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Boy with items from a food pack
Boy with items from a food pack

Thanks to your support RED International’s partners in Iraq were able to successfully complete phase two of the food and hygiene distribution project that began in May and ended in October 2016.

During the last 6 months, Operation Mercy (OPM) conducted a total of 6 distributions in different locations. The project was started as phase 2 of the food and hygiene distribution project in Var City which was conducted from December 2015 to March 2016. However, because OPM had to change partner halfway through the project this also meant a change of location as well.

In consultation with the World Food Program (WFP) and Zalal Life, a local NGO, seven other locations were chosen: six villages around Sharia and a targeted group in Domiz Camp. Overall OPM has served 3852 families / 19098 individuals. This report will cover the different locations separately.

Var City
Located about 20 kilometres outside of Dohuk, Var City is currently home to around 1505 families. Of these families, 925 are Syrian refugee families and 580 are internally displaced Iraqi families from and around Mosul. Many of the Syrians fled Syria after the start of the civil war in March 2011. Others, like the internally displaced people (IDPs)from Mosul, fled from ISIS’s brutal invasion during the summer of 2014. There was also a number of IDPs that moved to Var City between April and June 2016.

"Var City" is not an official camp, but an apartment complex that is mainly rented by Syrian refugees and Iraqi IDPs. Because it is not a formal camp setting, it has received little attention and assistance from the UN and the international community. Due to lack of funding, WFP had to stop providing food rations in September 2015. The pressure to meet their basic needs is one of the factors which caused an estimated 200 Syrian refugee families to attempt migration from Var City to Europe in search of hope. Our partner organization, HOME, was one of the few organizations continuously providing health services and English classes. Var City was chosen in part because our partner organization shares OPM’s long-term vision to see a transformational impact through empowering, training, and mentoring relationships in the community.

Operation Mercy (OPM) conducted 2 distributions in Var City in May and June 2016 (both food pack distributions) and served 1505 families / 6550 individuals. Unfortunately, HOME had to close down their activities in June 2016.

The villages around Sharia
South of Dohuk lies the town Sharia in the heart of a valley. Around this town several villages are situated against the slopes of two mountain ranges. Yezidi IDP’s have moved into the mostly unfinished houses that make up these villages. OPM decided to distribute food and hygiene kits in these villages in order to build the capacity of Zalal Life, their local partner which works in this area.

All the people living in these villages are Yezidis. The Yezidi people group are an ethnoreligious group of less than one million people who live primarily in Iraq’s northern Ninewa province.

They are ethnically Kurdish, speaking the Kurmanji dialect of Kurdish, as well as Arabic in some villages. Throughout their history they have been targets of ethnic violence over 70 times, and in the summer of 2014 they were once again targeted as the Islamic State attacked their heartland in Sinjar. An estimated 5,000 men were killed and 5,000-7,000 women captured for use as slaves and brides for ISIS fighters. The people residing in the villages around Sharia have managed to flee and were able to settle in this valley. Many families have no regular income and live off their savings and distributions by NGOs.

In total six villages were served with one hygiene kit and three food pack distributions: Rekava (211 families), Gre Pane (199 families), Shekhedre (135 families), Kharshany (197 families), Galy Badre (177 families) and Sharia Keven (338 families). In total 1257 families / 7134 individuals were served in these villages.

One of the recipients in Sharia Keven, Omar, lives in a small brick house that he built himself with the help of other NGOs. He comes from Qahtaniya, a village close to Sinjar, and fled up the mountains when ISIS was coming close. He has 8 children, of whom six are blind. He had to carry those six up the mountain one by one. He would walk 100 meters with one of his children on his back and walk back to get the next one. All the while ISIS was getting closer. They stayed on the mountain for 7 days in the soaring sun without food and hardly any water. They had a chance to get to Sharia and were able to settle in Sharia Keven. However, other Yezidi families arrived before him and had already occupied all the empty buildings. For two extra nights he and his family had to sleep outside. Then they received a tent from an NGO.

Now, two years later, he has managed to build a simple home. Omar mentions that no-one is helping him or his family.  His wife became sick and needs treatment. He has got no job and no money, but has to provide for his family and his sister. He was very grateful for the OPM food and hygiene kits, as without these kits they would not have enough food.

Domiz Camp
World Food Program (WFP) in coordination with the local government was looking for an NGO to help out distributing food kits in Domiz Camp. This camp is one of the oldest camps in Dohuk province and was established in April 2012 to host Syrian Kurds. The majority of Domiz’s refugee population comes from Hassakeh and Damascus.

Although the camp has 31,000 people, WFP and the local government presented a list of around 500 families for every distribution. These families were targeted as the most vulnerable families of the camp.

Zalal Life works in this camp as well and therefore partnered with OPM during the distributions. For each distribution a different list was provided. Although many families received a food or hygiene kit 2 or 3 times, there were only 33 families which received a kit in all four of the distributions. Altogether OPM served 1090 families / 5414 individuals in total.

Some of the families served were very poor. One of the families, visited by OPM in their tent, had just arrived from Syria. All they had for food for the coming days was one bag of rice and a crate of rotten tomatoes. Families like these were overly thankful for receiving the food pack from OPM.

Employment
One of the objectives for the project was to employ 80 men and women from the communities as day labourers in order to provide them with extra income. In total, 152 men and have been employed for a day’s work; 50 of these men and women have been employed multiple times.

Thank you for helping make this phase of the project so successful.

The Current Situation and plans for the coming months.

The current situation on the ground is that there are 2,400 new IDPs (around 450 families) from Mosul who have come to the region where Operation Mercy is working. They have been placed in Zilikan IDP camp, where around 17 NGOs are currently operating. According to the assistant governor of Dohuk, there is a lot of support from these NGOs to provide for the new arrivals in the reception centres and in Zilikan.

This has meant that some of the existing IDPs are still struggling to survive. There provision has been made for large numbers of IPDs to come into this region and there are stockpiles of supplies for new arrivals. In general NGOs are scaling back their support for existing IDPs and refugees.

Operation Mercy will continue to focus on existing IDP’s and refugees and will look for gaps in the IDP and refugee community where the next main focus of their relief work will take place. Providing assistance to new arrivals will depend on how the situation in Mosul develops and when more IDPs come this region. Operation Mercy is currently looking at the possibility of supplying medical equipment for a hospital which will serve IDPs, including new arrivals from Mosul.

50% Matched Funding Opportunity on 29th November 2016 #GivingTuesday

We would be grateful if you would encourage others to support this project on 29th November 2016 which is designated #GivingTuesday. All donations of up to $1000 will be increased by 50% with matched funding while the funds last. Please consider sharing this project with your friends, colleagues and wider networks. GlobalGiving US have an incredible $500,000 of matching funds available. Donations can be made from 00:00:01 EST on Tuesday 29th November 2016.

GlobalGiving UK also have a 50% matched funding opportunity on 29th November with £20,000 of matching funds on donations up to £600.

A family with the supplies they have received
A family with the supplies they have received
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
 

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating.

Get Reports via Email

We'll only email you new reports and updates about this project.

Organization Information

RED International

Location: Oswestry, Shropshire - United Kingdom
Website:
RED International
Andrew Sinclair
Project Leader:
Andrew Sinclair
Oswestry, Shropshire United Kingdom

Funded Project!

Combined with other sources of funding, this project raised enough money to fund the outlined activities and is no longer accepting donations.
   

Still want to help?

Find another project in Iraq or in Disaster Response that needs your help.
Find a Project

Learn more about GlobalGiving

Teenage Science Students
Vetting +
Due Diligence

Snorkeler
Our
Impact

Woman Holding a Gift Card
Give
Gift Cards

Young Girl with a Bicycle
GlobalGiving
Guarantee

Sign up for the GlobalGiving Newsletter

WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.