Stop The Killing of Dogs & Cats in Japan

by Peace Winds Japan
Stop The Killing of Dogs & Cats in Japan
Stop The Killing of Dogs & Cats in Japan
Stop The Killing of Dogs & Cats in Japan
Stop The Killing of Dogs & Cats in Japan
Stop The Killing of Dogs & Cats in Japan
Stop The Killing of Dogs & Cats in Japan
Stop The Killing of Dogs & Cats in Japan
Stop The Killing of Dogs & Cats in Japan
Stop The Killing of Dogs & Cats in Japan
Stop The Killing of Dogs & Cats in Japan
Stop The Killing of Dogs & Cats in Japan
Stop The Killing of Dogs & Cats in Japan
Stop The Killing of Dogs & Cats in Japan
Stop The Killing of Dogs & Cats in Japan
Stop The Killing of Dogs & Cats in Japan
Stop The Killing of Dogs & Cats in Japan
Stop The Killing of Dogs & Cats in Japan
Stop The Killing of Dogs & Cats in Japan
Stop The Killing of Dogs & Cats in Japan
Stop The Killing of Dogs & Cats in Japan
Stop The Killing of Dogs & Cats in Japan
Stop The Killing of Dogs & Cats in Japan
Stop The Killing of Dogs & Cats in Japan
Stop The Killing of Dogs & Cats in Japan
Peace Wanco Project
Peace Wanco Project

A day on the road collecting abandoned dogs and strays from welfare centers 

Today is a day when stray and abandoned dogs that have been facing probable euthanasia will be rescued from state-run welfare centers. I accompanied staff en route to three different locations within Hiroshima Prefecture to collect the dogs and transfer them to kennels at a quarantine facility, where staff are already preparing for their arrival, drawing up evaluation documents and registering names on microchips, a device that can prove crucial should the animals ever become parted from their new owners. 

On this day, staff are scheduled to collect 15 dogs from the Mihara welfare center, 11 of them abandoned by one owner. As we drove along I was told that those 11 canines were taken to the welfare center simply because the owner could no longer look after such a large number of dogs.

“At first, I think the owner probably started keeping the dogs out of a genuine fondness for them, and while there are various reasons that could explain why the number of dogs increased to tat extent, it’s likely the owners eventually found they just couldn’t cope,” the staffer explained. “It’s difficult to put into words how I feel about this, but it’s pretty frustrating.” 

 After arriving at one welfare center, we are joined by the project leader, Makoto Abe, who has come over from the Kure Animal Welfare Center about 35 km away, where he has been since early in the morning. 

As we checked the condition of the dogs, Abe explained the condition of each one: This one was perfectly tame and could be stroked by anyone, he said; another, he thought, was ready for transfer, but just needed some more practice being walked. Yet another looked to be pregnant. 

As the checks were carried out, I couldn’t help wondering how the dogs themselves were feeling as they waited. 

The dogs that were collected were loaded into the vehicle, Abe talking to them reassuringly: “You may feel a little car sick, but hang in there ‘til we get to the quarantine kennel in Jinseki, okay?" he said, as he and the other staff headed toward their next port of call. “Sorry, you’re not going to get a nap today.”

At the next welfare center, too, the condition of the dogs was checked. “They seem well fed and in good shape,” Abe commented as he checked one of the dogs. “It’s okay, it’s okay, oh you’re a cutie,” he said as he picked up another, and loaded it with the others into the car. 

The day’s work is only half done. After returning to the shelter Jinseki Kogen, a highland area about 30 km northeast of Mihara, all the dogs are taken to quarantine kennels, where they are examined by a vet. In addition to an overall health check, blood tests are done and they are vaccinated and microchipped. 

But there’s still plenty of work to be done on this long day, the dogs now safely transferred to a safe and welcoming environment. 

Please check out the link below for a video of the work that was done on this fruitful day.

https://youtu.be/PhqQwwQ22L8

Peace Wanco Project
Peace Wanco Project
Peace Wanco Project
Peace Wanco Project
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The Peace Wanko Japan project was set up to rescues dogs who are in danger of being euthanized. Some of those dogs are wild, others abandoned. Many of them are sick and traumatized.

We believe every dog's life is precious. All dogs can be loving companions if they, too, are taken care of and loved. Many of those that have been abandoned have lost trust in that mutual love "agreement."

At Peace Wanko Japan we try to regain their trust, letting them know that humans can be their friends and are not to be feared. We do this by being their family—all staff members care for dogs with love and happiness, even the sick ones.

But our job is no where near complete. Every year, thousands of abandoned dogs are subjected to a pitiful end in the state's gas chambers. According to Japan's Environ Ministry, 5,635 canines were put down in 2019 alone. Every day, so-called "welfare" centers, which should be charged with protecting these animals, are responsible for killing them in those cruel and toxic gas chambers, known euphemistically as the "Dream Box."

People living with pets are on the rise as they spend more time at home during the Covid-19 pandemic. On the other hand, the number of people who are abandoning dogs is also growing. Many of the owners say raising pets is too difficult because they "don't listen" and are "noisy" and "smelly." Often, they simply don't realize the responsibility that comes with keeping dogs and other pets.

We are continuing our efforts to find responsible families who will provide continuous love and care for the dogs we have managed to rescue. We always welcome those people who love dogs and who make the necessary preparations to welcome them into their homes as one of the family.

We would like to express our deep appreciation for your support in these ongoing efforts. Please continue to send your love to our dogs so that we can find them homes and they can be happy once more. Through your help, we will strive to save as many lives as possible. Thank you!

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Organization Information

Peace Winds Japan

Location: Jinsekikogen-cho, Hiroshima Prefecture - Japan
Website:
Project Leader:
Hiroshi Kunita
Jinsekikogen-cho, Hiroshima Prefecture Japan
$4,952 raised of $50,000 goal
 
67 donations
$45,048 to go
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