Help raise Philipina's offspring to release

by Wildlife Conservation Trust
Play Video
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release

Project Report | Dec 7, 2023
Separation preparation for Philipina's offspring

By Lente Roode | Project Leader

Enjoying the shade under the tree
Enjoying the shade under the tree

Philipina’s offspring have now reached sexual maturity, which means it is time to start separating them. In the wild, female cheetahs are solitary animals, and will only be seen in the presence of other cheetahs if they are with their cubs, or near a male cheetah during breeding season. Male cheetahs tend to stay in groups called coalitions.

At the Hoedspruit Endangered Species Centre, they keep a close eye on the cheetahs to see when it is time to begin the separation process. At the moment, two of Philipina’s offspring are together in the one area, two in another, and the female King cheetah on her own. If you follow us on social media, you will recall from our post on the 19th of April this year, that the female King cheetah was separated from the others so that a wound on her hip could be attended to. While alone in recovery, she already showed signs of preferring solitude, so it was decided to keep her separate from this point on, which we posted about on the 12th of June.

When the time comes, if the others show signs of wanting to be alone, they too will be moved, with the male cheetah being placed with a suitable coalition at the Centre.

We will now be closing off this project, as Philipina’s offspring are adults and their next step will be to stay at the Centre until a suitable reserve is found for their release. Many factors go into the choice of reserve, including the existing cheetah metapopulation, as well as the DNA of the cheetahs.

We would like to thank each and every person who so generously donated towards their care. Please do continue to follow us on social media as we will bring you news of their releases here.

A couple of the photos below show the cheetahs in their feeding area. This is a cordoned-off cemented space where their food is placed, and a trap door opened to allow the cheetahs to enter and be fed. This is done so that their food intake can be monitored. Once they have eaten, they are then left to go back out into their natural wild areas.

One of the cheetahs approaching the feeding area
One of the cheetahs approaching the feeding area
Tucking into a specially developed meal
Tucking into a specially developed meal
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

Aug 10, 2023
Philipina's cubs are now officially adults!

By Lente Roode | Project Leader

Apr 14, 2023
Dr Rogers to the rescue

By Lente Roode | Project Leader

About Project Reports

Project reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you can recieve an email when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports without donating.

Sign up for updates

Organization Information

Wildlife Conservation Trust

Location: Pretoria - South Africa
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @Trust_Wildlife
Project Leader:
Lente Roode
Pretoria , Gauteng South Africa

Funded Project!

Combined with other sources of funding, this project raised enough money to fund the outlined activities and is no longer accepting donations.
   

Still want to help?

Support another project run by Wildlife Conservation Trust that needs your help, such as:

Find a Project

Learn more about GlobalGiving

Teenage Science Students
Vetting +
Due Diligence

Snorkeler
Our
Impact

Woman Holding a Gift Card
Give
Gift Cards

Young Girl with a Bicycle
GlobalGiving
Guarantee

Get incredible stories, promotions, and matching offers in your inbox

WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.