Help raise Philipina's offspring to release

by Wildlife Conservation Trust
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Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release
Help raise Philipina's offspring to release

Project Report | Apr 14, 2023
Dr Rogers to the rescue

By Lente Roode | Project Leader

The growth area is shaved for surgery
The growth area is shaved for surgery

Philipina’s cubs are now 22 months old and are nearing the end of their adolescence phase before being classified as adults. They are still together in the same enclosure but the curators at the Hoedspruit Endangered Species Centre will be keeping a close eye on them to see whether they need to be separated. Female cheetahs are independent and spend time alone in the wild, while male cheetahs tend to stay in groups called coalitions.

Part of taking care of these cubs involves making sure that they are in good health. This means that they are monitored often to check for any changes that may occur. Such an incident happened recently when the curators noticed a growth on the hip of the female King cheetah cub. Wildlife vet Dr Peter Rogers was called in and the cub was taken to the clinic where she was given surgery to remove the growth. She is being kept separately for now so that she can be monitored to ensure that the wound heals properly.

It is thanks to all our loyal supporters that veterinary treatment and care for these cubs is possible. We want to make sure that these cheetahs get the best start in life so that when they are finally released into the wild, they are in the best position to thrive.

Dr Rogers dressing the wound post-surgery
Dr Rogers dressing the wound post-surgery
Wound dressing completed
Wound dressing completed
In the clinic and ready to be woken up
In the clinic and ready to be woken up
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Organization Information

Wildlife Conservation Trust

Location: Pretoria - South Africa
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @Trust_Wildlife
Project Leader:
Lente Roode
Pretoria , Gauteng South Africa

Funded Project!

Combined with other sources of funding, this project raised enough money to fund the outlined activities and is no longer accepting donations.
   

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