Navajo Horses Rescue and Recovery Mission

by Wild for Life Foundation
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Navajo Horses Rescue and Recovery Mission
Navajo Horses Rescue and Recovery Mission
Navajo Horses Rescue and Recovery Mission
Navajo Horses Rescue and Recovery Mission
Navajo Horses Rescue and Recovery Mission
Navajo Horses Rescue and Recovery Mission
Navajo Horses Rescue and Recovery Mission
Navajo Horses Rescue and Recovery Mission
Navajo Horses Rescue and Recovery Mission
Navajo Horses Rescue and Recovery Mission
Navajo Horses Rescue and Recovery Mission
Navajo Horses Rescue and Recovery Mission
Navajo Horses Rescue and Recovery Mission
Navajo Horses Rescue and Recovery Mission
Navajo Horses Rescue and Recovery Mission
Navajo Horses Rescue and Recovery Mission
Navajo Horses Rescue and Recovery Mission
Navajo Horses Rescue and Recovery Mission
Navajo Horses Rescue and Recovery Mission
Navajo Horses Rescue and Recovery Mission
Navajo Horses Rescue and Recovery Mission

This project serves to fill the essential needs for up to 20 rescued horses and burros in need, and advocates for the protection and preservation horses and burros on Native and public lands.

With a focus on the prevention of cruelty as the primary goal, WFLF strongly urges a strong and united voice for the protection of wild horses and burros from roundups, slaughter, and extinction. We also advocate for conservation measures that benefit the environment without causing harm to indigenous species, and that most certainly includes America’s wild horses and burros.

The Wild for Life Foundation’s (WFLF) Navajo Horse Rescue and Recovery Mission (NHRRM) was founded in 2013 to provide lifesaving rescue and sanctuary services for victimized wild horses and burros facing life threatening circumstances including roundups, slaughter, and other forms of cruelty.

The Wild For Life Foundation (WFLF) has been at the forefront of bringing the un-whitewashed truth to the public on the issue of horse slaughter and the protection of wild horses and burros in the wild.  In 2013, WFLF brought international attention to how the USDA and US Forest Service threaten tribal leaders with the cancellation of grazing permits if they fail to remove wild horses from public lands. (Learn more)

When the dots are connected – the horses, the ranchers, the BLM, the USDA, FWS, Forestry, and the BIA, it’s clear that the central force driving the round ups is the BLM, a government agency under the Department of Interior. And with a look into how the BLM was set up and how they are governed... the records reflect that the BLM’s administrators are primarily ranchers governing from separate offices in each state which enables them to control the policies in which they are regulated.

Wild horse removals on the Navajo Nation were reportedly halted in 2020. Roughly 3000 equines were reportedly removed in 2018. 1500 were reportedly removed in 2019, and the last number reported as removed in 2020 was 600. Independent reports indicate that more effective measures must be enacted for the protection of Navajo horses and burros from abuse, killing, roundups and slaughter.

Although the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) have full knowledge of the true heritage of America’s wild horses and burros, and the many ways that they complement the environment, the BLM and BIA continue to hide the truth and misinform the public and our lawmakers. By labeling them an invasive species, America’s indigenous wild horses and burros are denied the legal status and protection they deserve. As a result, they have been harassed, shot, rounded up, and hauled off to slaughter by the BLM and BIA. The BLM has aggressively escalated these and other insidious activities including experimental sterilization, and now the last remaining free roaming horses and burros are being driven to extinction.

America’s wild horses have been denied any genuine status or protection in the US. They have instead been labeled as “feral” and “invasive” which allows them to be legally harassed, shot, rounded up and hauled off to slaughter.

Horses and burros were previously thought to have disappeared from the continent roughly 10,000 years ago. However, a surmounting body of evidence confirms that horses never totally died out in America. Substantial evidence proves that the Equus species survived the ice age in America, and evidence of their continued presence has become too substantial to ignore.

Incontrovertible and indisputable fossil records and molecular biology evidence confirms that today’s Genus Equus (HORSES, BURROS and ZEBRAS) originated and co-evolved with the habitat of North America. Many people don’t even realize that the genus EQUUS, today’s horses and burros are GENETICALLY THE SAME as those that lived in the U.S. before their presumed extinction.

Why is this important? As a native species, wild horses and burros compliment the natural environment of North America. They are recognized by scientists all over the world for restoring rangelands, boosting biodiversity, and helping to the return of a wide variety of plants and invertebrates to the lands where they roam. Scientists and conservationists have indeed found that the re-introduction of wild equines to open lands is a positive way to restore ecosystems and wildlife.

WFLF is committed to meeting the challenge of sustaining this lifesaving project and to increasing protection for all horses and burros from the torturous agony of roundups and slaughter through permanent federal bi-partisan legislation that forbids slaughter on American soil and forever bans the export of live horses to slaughterhouses in other countries, and that safeguards wild equines from extinction, exploitation, harassment, and killing through responsible, humane and nonlethal management practices on both tribal and public lands.

We at WFLF believe that the circle of life is eternal and in realizing how we came to be where we are, we must also look ahead at where we are going. We as native people we honor our horse relatives, and we know that the American public, without a doubt is adamantly opposed to slaughtering them. Horses are as much a part of the land as we are; their future is our future.

As the remaining number of Wild Horses in the U.S. nears extinction, education and appreciation through their protection in the wild becomes tantamount to their survival as a species. America’s Wild Horses cannot be reproduced once they are gone!

In addition to raising awareness, this project helps WFLF to provide safe harbor habitats and essential provisions for the continuum of quality care and protection of rescued wild and domestic horses and burros in need, including a number of rescue horses, burros and Navajo mustangs whose lives had become at risk due to roundups and slaughter.

WFLF’s rescue and crisis assistance missions have saved hundreds of horses and burros over the years—the majority of whom would likely have gone to slaughter without the meaningful support of devoted supporters like you.

Please join us by making a difference and share this update with your friends. Your support matters and can help save lives today, tomorrow and for generations to come.

The Wild for Life Foundation’s (WFLF) Navajo Horse Rescue and Recovery Mission (NHRRM) is a lifesaving program which provides rescue and sanctuary services for wild horses and burros that have been saved from roundups, slaughter, and other forms of cruelty.

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The Wild for Life Foundation’s (WFLF) Navajo Horse Rescue and Recovery Mission (NHRRM) was founded in 2013 to provide lifesaving rescue and sanctuary services for victimized wild horses and burros facing life threatening circumstances including roundups, slaughter, and other forms of cruelty.

This project serves to fill the essential needs for up to 20 rescued horses and burros in need each year, and advocates for the protection and preservation horses and burros on Native and public lands.

With a focus on the prevention of cruelty as the primary goal, WFLF strongly urges a strong and united voice for the protection of wild horses and burros from roundups, slaughter, and extinction. We also advocate for conservation measures that benefit the environment without causing harm to indigenous species, and that most certainly includes wild horses and burros.

America’s wild horses have been denied any genuine status or protection in the US. They have instead been labeled as “feral” and “invasive” which allows them to be legally harassed, shot, rounded up and hauled off to slaughter.

Horses and burros were previously thought to have disappeared from the continent roughly 10,000 years ago. However, a surmounting body of evidence confirms that horses never totally died out in America. Substantial evidence proves that the Equus species survived the ice age in America, and evidence of their continued presence has become too substantial to ignore.

Incontrovertible and indisputable fossil records and molecular biology evidence confirms that today’s Genus Equus (HORSES, BURROS and ZEBRAS) originated and co-evolved with the habitat of North America. Many people don’t even realize that the genus EQUUS, today’s horses and burros are GENETICALLY THE SAME as those that lived in the U.S. before their presumed extinction.

Why is this important? As a native species, wild horses and burros compliment the natural environment of North America. They are recognized by scientists all over the world for restoring rangelands, boosting biodiversity, and helping to the return of a wide variety of plants and invertebrates to the lands where they roam. Scientists and conservationists have indeed found that the re-introduction of wild equines to open lands is a positive way to restore ecosystems and wildlife.

Although the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) have full knowledge of the true heritage of America’s wild horses and burros, and the many ways that they complement the environment, the BLM and BIA continue to hide the truth and misinform the public and our lawmakers. By labeling them an invasive species, America’s indigenous wild horses and burros are denied the legal status and protection they deserve. As a result, they have been harassed, shot, rounded up, and hauled off to slaughter by the BLM and BIA. The BLM has aggressively escalated these and other insidious activities including experimental sterilization, and now the last remaining free roaming horses and burros are being driven to extinction.

America’s wild horses and burros need you to act on their behalf; to help protect them from roundups, slaughter, and extinction, before it’s too late!

Please join us by making a difference by sharing this report with your friends. Your support matters and can help save lives today, tomorrow and for generations to come.

The Wild For Life Foundation (WFLF) has been at the forefront of bringing the un-whitewashed truth to the public on the issue of horse slaughter and the protection of wild horses and burros in the wild. We thank you for your continued support.

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ALERT: Thousands of wild horses’ and burros’ lives and the future of America’s free-roaming wild horses and burros are under immediate threat of destruction.   

The U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) have accelerated their violent roundups and their intended removal of the last wild horses and burros from America’s public lands.

Time is Running Out

At the turn of the 20th century there were over 2 million wild horses and burros on America's public lands. However, according to the BLM’s own 2020-2021 estimate, the actual number of wild horses and burros on the open range has drastically declined by more than 96%.  Truth be known, this drastic decline was caused by The BLM, which is the same government agency that is charged by Congress to protect America’s wild horses and burros. In fact, according to the BLM’s most recent submitted report to Congress, BLM 2020 WHB Report, the BLM fully intends to severely diminish their natural presence in the wild to less than 98%.

As revealed by the BLM 2020 WHB Report, the BLM is complicit in their methodical plan of genocidal intent to wipe out the last 1.3% of America’s precious wild horses and burros through escalated violent roundups and permanent sterilization. (It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out what happens when you sterilize the last 1.3% of any population.)

It’s a modern day “Trail of Tears” for America’s horses and burros which are being zeroed out from their native lands. We as native people honor this sacred relative; horses are as much a part of the land as we are; their future is our future.

Need-to-Know facts about the use PZP on free-roaming wild horses and burros

The off-label use of pesticides (aka PZP) is widely accepted for use by wild horse advocates to suppress fertility in captive Mustangs in nonbreeding environments such as sanctuaries and preserves. However, the repeated use of these chemicals on equines in the wild could spell total disaster for wild equines due to the long-term adverse effects. As such, PZP (aka Spayvac) has come under fire by a growing number of concerned advocates. Evidence sited by critics shows the use of Spayvac and Gonacon on wild free roaming horses has been found to sterilize the mares and suppress their natural hormonal behaviors. Their fitness is altered, as is their ability to survive in the wild.

PZP is a pesticide-sterilant that was registered without toxicity-testing. It tricks the immune system into producing antibodies that cause ovarian dystrophy, autoimmune oophoritis, ovarian cysts, and premature ovarian failure. It causes out-of-season births, where foaling occurs nearly year-round rather than in the Spring. After just 3 consecutive treatments, return to fertility could take up to 8 years, if ever, and the if the first dose is given before puberty it can trigger sterility.

Some wild horse advocates are pushing for implementation of PZP fertility control to move away from BLM's cruel and costly helicopter roundups. However, the use of PZP on naturally living free roaming wild horses and burros may very well result in unintended consequences. Another words, if the last of America’s free-roaming wild horses and burros are repeatedly treated with PZP, their existence in the wild will be over.

About the Navajo Horses Rescue and Recovery Mission
This project serves to fill the essential needs for up to 20 rescued horses and burros in need for 1 year, and advocates for the protection and preservation horses and burros on Native and public lands.

The Wild For Life Foundation (WFLF) has been at the forefront of bringing the un-whitewashed truth to the public on the issue of horse slaughter and the protection of wild horses and burros in the wild.  In 2013, WFLF brought international attention to how the USDA and Forest Services threaten tribal leaders with the cancellation of grazing permits if they fail to remove wild horses from public lands. (Learn more)

When the dots are connected – the horses, the ranchers, the BLM, the USDA, FWS, Forestry, and the BIA, it’s clear that the central force driving the round ups is the BLM, a government agency under the Department of Interior. And with a look into how the BLM was set up and how they are governed... the records reflect that the BLM’s administrators are primarily ranchers governing from separate offices in each state which enables them to control the policies in which they are regulated.

Wild horse removals on the Navajo Nation were reportedly halted in 2020. Roughly 3000 equines were reportedly removed in 2018. 1500 were reportedly removed in 2019, and the last number reported as removed in 2020 was 600.

With a focus on the prevention of cruelty as the primary goal, WFLF strongly urges a strong and united voice for the protection of wild horses and burros from roundups, slaughter, and extinction. Supporting conservation measures that benefit the environment without harming our horses and burros is one sure way that people can make a compelling difference.

America’s wild horses and burros need you to act on their behalf; to help protect them from roundups, slaughter, and extinction, before it’s too late!

Please join us by making a difference and share this update with your friends. Your support matters and can help save lives today, tomorrow and for generations to come.

The Wild for Life Foundation’s (WFLF) Navajo Horse Rescue and Recovery Mission (NHRRM) is a lifesaving program which provides rescue and sanctuary services for wild horses and burros that have been saved from roundups, slaughter, and other forms of cruelty.

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

America's wild horse and burro herds across the west are under siege. The U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) are aggressively moving forward with their plan to continue helicopter roundups, and remove and stockpile tens of thousands of wild horses and burros whom currently reside on America's rangelands. 

The 1971 Wild Horse and Burro Act is supposed to protect America’s wild horse and burro population from cruelty and harassment, however there is no enforcement of the law and the BLM has not been held accountable for the enumerable atrocities they have caused, and which continue to this day.

The BLM would like to remove as many as 90,000 wild horses and burros from public lands.  They have continued to accelerate their cruel helicopter roundups this year, and without intervention, they intend to continue conducting a combination of barbaric ovariectomies and permanent chemical sterilization as well.

The practice of surgical sterilization raises multiple red flags. Surgical sterilization has been found to be painful and dangerous for individual animals and would threaten the diversity and health of whole herds. These procedures have reportedly put mares at serious risk of infection, hemorrhaging and other post-operative complications, some of which can result in painful death. Plus, the cost associated with sterilizing large numbers of equines in the field is unknown.

The off-label use of pesticides (aka PZP) is widely accepted for use by wild horse advocates to suppress fertility in captive Mustangs in nonbreeding environments such as sanctuaries and preserves. However, the repeated use of these chemicals on equines in the wild could spell total disaster for wild equines due to the long-term adverse effects. As such, PZP (aka Spayvac) has come under fire by a growing number of concerned advocates. Evidence sited by critics shows the use of Spayvac and Gonacon on wild free roaming horses has been found to sterilize the mares and suppress their natural hormonal behaviors. Their fitness is altered, as is their ability to survive in the wild.

PZP is a pesticide-sterilant that was registered without toxicity-testing. It tricks the immune system into producing antibodies that cause ovarian dystrophy, autoimmune oophoritis, ovarian cysts, and premature ovarian failure. It causes out-of-season births, where foaling occurs nearly year-round rather than in the Spring. After just 3 consecutive treatments, return to fertility could take up to 8 years, if ever, and the if the first dose is given before puberty it can trigger sterility.

Some wild horse advocates are pushing for implementation of PZP fertility control as a means to move away from BLM's cruel and costly helicopter roundups. However, the use of PZP on naturally living free roaming wild horses and burros may very well result in unintended consequences. Another words, if most of the wild horses are rounded up and removed with only small numbers of mares who are repeatedly treated with PZP before being released back into the wild, America’s wild horses would soon be extinct.

Wild Horse and Burro Issue Background:

The BLM misleads the public by saying that wild horses and burros are over populating, starving and dying of dehydration out on the range, and they use this misinformation to justify their removal and killing.

The BLM claims to care and protect our wild horses and burros on the range and in captivity, by touting the laws which are supposed to keep them safe from cruelty, harassment and death. In truth America's horses and burros need protection from the BLM. The mislabeling and eradication of wild horses and burros on America’s public rangelands is a clear demonstration of BLM's support for the competing economic value of commercial livestock and the BLM's defiance of their mandate to protect wild horses and burros.

Navajo Roundups:

Wild horse removals on the Navajo Nation were halted in 2020. Reportedly 3000 equines were removed in 2018, 1500 in 2019 and the last number reported as removed in 2020 was 600.

Protecting America's Wild Equines:

Through this and other WFLF outreach projects, we also raise awareness about the true heritage of horses and burros. For example, did you know that horses and burros are Native to North America? It’s true! But their indigenous heritage to North America is ignored by those who manage our lands in order to satisfy competing land use interests. In fact, horses and burros are routinely labeled as an “invasive species” to justify their extermination. Without the enforcement of strong safeguards to protect wild horses and burros on tribal reservations and U.S. public lands they will continue to be targeted for violent expulsion through roundup, slaughter and even hunting.

WFLF advocates for recognition of the wild horses’ and burros’ rightful Native status in the U.S. as part of the natural ecosystem which yields their protection from extinction under the law.

A surmounting body of evidence underscores the value of wild equids as keystone herbivores in our failing ecosystems, as wildfire fuel reducers. In the Soda Mountain Wilderness area of California, wild horses have been found to reduce both the frequency and intensity of catastrophic wildfire! Their presence in the wild also helps to slow climate change via a reduction in CO2 emissions from catastrophic wildfires. In the United Kingdom and other parts of the world, entire rangelands are successfully being rejuvenated through the return of wild equids in conservation grazing.

America's wild horses and burros are living symbols of the historic spirit of the West. They contribute to the diversity of life forms within the environment and enrich the lives of the people. However, they are sadly disappearing from the landscape and must be protected.

WFLF is committed to meeting the challenge of sustaining this lifesaving project and to increasing protection for all horses and burros from the torturous agony of roundups and slaughter through permanent federal bi-partisan legislation that forbids slaughter on American soil and forever bans the export of live horses to slaughterhouses in other countries, and that safeguards wild equines from extinction, exploitation, harassment, and killing through responsible, humane and nonlethal management practices on both tribal and public lands.

We at WFLF believe that the circle of life is eternal and in realizing how we came to be where we are, we must also look ahead at where we are going. We as native people we honor our horse relatives, and we know that the American public, without a doubt is adamantly opposed to slaughtering them. Horses are as much a part of the land as we are; their future is our future.

As the remaining number of Wild Horses in the U.S. nears extinction, education and appreciation through their protection in the wild becomes tantamount to their survival as a species. America’s Wild Horses cannot be reproduced once they are gone!

In addition to raising awareness, this project helps WFLF to provide safe harbor habitats and essential provisions for the continuum of quality care and protection of rescued wild and domestic horses and burros in need, including a number of rescue horses, burros and Navajo mustangs whose lives had become at risk due to roundups and slaughter.

With a focus on the prevention of cruelty as the primary goal, WFLF strongly urges a strong and united voice for the protection of wild horses and burros from roundups, slaughter and extinction. Supporting conservation measures that benefit the environment without harming our horses and burros is one sure way that people can make a compelling difference.

America’s wild horses and burros need you to act on their behalf; to help protect them from roundups, slaughter and extinction, before it’s too late!

Please join us by making a difference and share this update with your friends. Your support matters and can help save lives today, tomorrow and for generations to come.

The Wild for Life Foundation’s (WFLF) Navajo Horse Rescue and Recovery Mission (NHRRM) is a lifesaving program which provides rescue and sanctuary services for wild horses and burros that have been saved from roundups, slaughter and other forms of cruelty. These animals come to us traumatized, shattered, desperate and betrayed. Through our program they find love, quality care, safety, compassion, dignity, trust, hope and a new beginning.

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The Wild For Life Foundation (WFLF) is sending out our deepest gratitude to the countless frontline workers, essential workers, volunteers and others who have been there to help both people and animals in need, as best possible during these uncertain times. 

As we reflect on all the horses and burros we have saved from life threatening circumstances since founding the NHRRM, we are also humbled and extremely thankful for the ongoing support that’s made it possible for us to place these majestic animals into our sanctuary program and also into new loving homes.  Although we realize that not all animals can be saved, our commitment is to do our utmost for all animals that remain under our custodial care.  We believe that every life matters and we will keep doing everything possible to meet the needs of the vulnerable animals served through WFLF.

Through this project and our equine sanctuary program, we continue to provide ongoing health and veterinary medical care, food and housing to all the unadoptable and special needs wild and domestic equines we have rescued over the years, including a growing number of senior equines who ages range between 20 – 35 years old. 

Again, we thank you for supporting our work, by following us here at GlobalGiving, and for sharing information about our mission with your likeminded friends and family. We especially thank those of you who have been able to continue donating in support of our work.  Your donations are helping to save lives every day.

On behalf of WFLF’s Navajo Horse Rescue and Recovery Mission and the animals we serve, we send our warmest wishes to you and your family, with many blessings of peace, good health, joy and prosperity for the coming year and beyond.

Yours for the horses and burros,

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Wild for Life Foundation

Location: Studio City, CA - USA
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Project Leader:
Katia Louise
Studio City, CA United States
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