Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal

by Doctors for Nepal
Play Video
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Make a Difference to Healthcare in Rural Nepal
Lalit celebrates with his colleagues
Lalit celebrates with his colleagues

We are delighted to announce that our very first doctor for Nepal, Lalit Jung Shahi, has qualified as a consultant.  Lalit has completed his post graduate studies in Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Cairo University in Egypt and has recently returned to Nepal.  Lalit writes:

“I would like to thank all who have donated money to DFN, and to thank the DFN trustees, DFN well-wishers, DFN family as a whole. It would not be possible without your kind support and help. Your financial help to me was a vital support. I would like to remember and give thanks specially to my boss, Dr Kate [Dr Kate Yarrow, founder of Doctors For Nepal] for trusting me for 16 years and continuously assisting, guiding, and supporting me to achieve this great moment in my life. I don't have words to express my feeling of gratitude to you Kate. We met not accidently, God send you to me to represent as a living God for me and many students from marginalize poor financial background in remote communities of Nepal. I will do my best to return the investment by working in most needed areas and populations. I will not let you down and will work for the DFN mission.”

On 18 November Lalit started a new job as a consultant at the government hospital in Surkhet, a remote village in Karnali province.  There is a huge patient flow through this hospital, and he will be kept very busy not only treating patients, but also helping to set up preventative programmes in other remote areas in the Karnali province.  Lalit is keen to continue supporting Manma hospital in his home village of Kalikot.

Lalit is also required to pass the Nepal Medical Council specialist exam which he will take at the end of December.  The Ministry of Health has allowed him to start his job before taking this exam, as they are in urgent need of doctors at Lalit’s level.

We wish Lalit all the luck there is to wish in his new role, and would like to extend our immense thanks to all our donors whose generous donations have made it possible for Lalit to reach new heights in his career.

Lalit presenting his thesis
Lalit presenting his thesis
Lalit with his professors
Lalit with his professors
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
DFN donated equipment arrives in Karnali
DFN donated equipment arrives in Karnali

In Nepal, from 3 January 2020 to 29 July 2021, there have been 690,642 confirmed cases of COVID-19 with 9,807 deaths, reported to the World Health Organisation. As of 25 July 2021, a total of 4,453,496 vaccine doses have been administered.

Back in May we launched an urgent Covid Nepal appeal to raise funds specifically to buy desperately needed equipment for rural hospitals in Nepal.  Our aim was to help tackle the Covid disaster that was rapidly spreading across Nepal. There had been a 668% increase in cases at the start of May (Oxford university data tracking site) with the charity receiving frantic daily pleas for help from our friends and colleagues in Nepal. Dr. Kamal (one of our DFN doctors who has just finished his internship in Kathmandu) wrote: “Our Health system has collapsed… hospitals cannot take patients because we don’t have any life-saving Oxygen… we are helpless”.

An “open border“ policy with India, had led to rapidly rising numbers of cases of the Indian Covid strain, and Nepal’s poor medical system and chaotic infrastructure are poorly placed to cope with such a disaster.

Patients were and still are presenting to hospitals and health-posts by the hundreds, and they are ill-equipped to do anything other than mutter quiet words of hope. Without international support, many more thousands would die, so we launched a fundraising campaign to urgently raise funds to provide oxygen concentrators & generators, pulse oximeters (to measure blood oxygen levels) and further supplies of high-quality PPE.

We worked closely with the NGO PHASE Nepal, with whom we have a long-standing collaborative relationship, to ensure the procurement of high-quality equipment, which, by the end of May, we are delighted to say arrived at ALL the remote locations we support – Mugu District Hospital, Karnali Academy of Health Sciences, Kalikot District Hospital, plus Patan Academy of Health Sciences in Kathmandu.  We had managed to raise enough funds to purchase this equipment which has helped to save lives of patients, and which has ensured the continued safety of our teams working in this high-risk environment.

At the beginning of July we got news from Dr Kamal and a picture of the DFN donated oxygen concentrator being used in the Covid ward at Mugu District Hospital.

Kamal says:
“Nepal is still in lockdown with Covid cases decreasing and recovery rate increasing. However, all help is being concentrated in Kathmandu and not in the remote districts of Nepal.

Testing facilities are very few and far between with community transmission of Covid rampant. In the remote areas of Nepal there is an extreme lack of testing facilities so there is a huge problem with identifying Covid cases early enough, and being able to put infected people into isolation.

There is a real need for many more testing kits and of course Covid vaccines.”

In other news we would like to offer our huge congratulations to Dr Kamal and Dr Apsara, who have both completed their 1 year internship at Patan Hospital in Kathmandu. They are now off to their remote regions of Kalikot and Jumla to take up jobs as doctors back in their home villages.  Their dream of bringing healthcare to rural Nepal has been realised - we are SO very proud of them.

Dr Kamal in full PPE
Dr Kamal in full PPE
Oxygen concentrator in use at Mugu Hospital
Oxygen concentrator in use at Mugu Hospital
Congratulations Dr Kamal!
Congratulations Dr Kamal!
Congratulations Dr Apsara!
Congratulations Dr Apsara!
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
New medical student Sangita
New medical student Sangita

We are very pleased to announce that we have started providing funds to cover board, lodging, and travel to Sangita, so that she can continue her 1st year medical studies at Patan Academy of Health Sciences (PAHS).

Before Sangita’s plight came to our attention, she was living a 2 hour bus ride away from PAHS making it 4 hours travelling every day to get to and from the medical school.

Sangita is on a full scholarship from the Nepal Government which covers all her tuition fees, but she has no other financial help. Her 4 hours of travel to and from PAHS was becoming untenable. This is where Doctors For Nepal has stepped in – we are providing Sangita with a partial scholarship so that she can live in the student hostel at PAHS, purchase a laptop (essential for completing her assignments), buy anatomy books that are needed for her course, and pay for her food in the student canteen. 

Sangita has just returned from her first residential posting as part of her Community Based Learning and Education (CBLE). She describes her experience in her own words:

"My first residentail posting went really very well.  I learn and enjoy a lot.  The CBLE posting was scheduled for 7 days. Our main objective was to familiarize about the physical, economic, environmental and socio-cultural determinants of health at ward level, and assess the existing health services at the Health Post.  We stayed at Padampokhari healthpost of Hetauda-13., Makwanpur. We tried to learn from community peopel. We conducted key informal interviews, with the the person in cahrg of the health post, the ward chairperson, the schol princiapl and the Budhist monastic, to find out about general status of health and its determinants. We also performed in-depth interview with 2 female community health volunteers to understand their duties and impact of their work on their life. The focus group discussion with a mothers' group was also conducted to find out about social problems existing there. I hope our posting was really very meaningly for my studies."

We have recorded a short video with Sangita in which she tells us why she wants to become and doctor and how, during the 2015 earthquake, her house in her village was completely destroyed.  Please see the link below.

Sangita is eternally grateful to Doctors For Nepal giving her financial support, as now she can concentrate on her studies to fulfil her dream of becoming a doctor in a remote area of Nepal.

Welcome dear Sangita to the Doctors For Nepal family.

Sangita's house, destroyed by the 2015 earthquake
Sangita's house, destroyed by the 2015 earthquake
Sangita measuring blood pressure at health post
Sangita measuring blood pressure at health post
Sangita (2nd left) with her project group
Sangita (2nd left) with her project group

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Dr Kamal gets ready for work
Dr Kamal gets ready for work

Nepal continues to experience rising numbers of COVID infections; a situation that will likely get worse as it moves into the bitterly cold winter.  Our team in Nepal have been greatly affected by the pandemic, and we strive to support them through these unimaginably difficult times. We held a fundraising auction at the end of the summer and successfully raised over £2000 to send PPE to some of the remote mountain hospitals, and we will continue to monitor and respond to their needs as the situation develops. Medical and nursing colleges sent all classes home at the beginning of lockdown, and our students have been desperately trying to keep up with their studies via online learning – often with limited internet access. They are expected to help out with daily chores in the family home, such as tending to crops and animals. Worryingly, many of our students and doctors have been personally affected by COVID.

"As the cases of corona viruses raising day by day here also, the mortality rate is increasing as well. At the start of October, Nepal had over 77,000 confirmed cases of Covid-10 with 500 deaths (Nepali Ministry of Health and Population). The symptomatic cases are increasing. Now, our country is in 2nd phase of lockdown. Even though the government made the strong intervention to combat with corona, it still fails to control the virus. This is because people are not following government rules strictly. Now it is claimed that the virus is transmitted in community level in remote part of country. This is bad because there are no required health facilities to fight against corona virus. In Karnali Academy of Health and Sciences Hospital (in North West Nepal) there are limited ICU beds and not much PPE. If large groups people are infected there will be no adequate facilities and people will just have to pray to God." Dr Kamal, junior doctor intern in Patan Hospital, Kathmandu

During lockdown, final year nursing student Yuna was unable to make it back to her village as all transport stopped, so has stayed in Kathmandu, studying online once her college re-opened.  She’s been keeping herself very busy – she joined the Nepal equivalent of the Rotary Club, and has been handing out food to street vendors and the poor of Kathmandu. She has also been teaching menstrual hygiene awareness to teenage girls and boys online and has been helping her local community, by measuring their blood pressure, taking their temperatures and providing health education. Great work Yuna!  

“In this pandemic I have done lots of thing for my community. I provided information about corona virus and how we can be stop ourselves from becoming a COVID patient. I try to put my medical knowledge into reality. I hope in the future that I can have a big impact on society; for this I would like to thank DFN.” Santosh (second year medical student)

We are extremely proud of all our doctors and student doctors, nurses and midwives, and all the work that they are doing to keep themselves and the people in their communitites safe from Covid-19.

 

Yuna hands out food in the streets of Kathmandu
Yuna hands out food in the streets of Kathmandu
Santosh helps his mother prepare food
Santosh helps his mother prepare food

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
PPE delivered to rural health post
PPE delivered to rural health post

COVID-19 NEWS: as COVID-19 lockdown measures begin to ease in many parts of the world, the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Nepal continues to rise. As of 24th July, there have been 18,374 cases of coronavirus infections active in 76 districts, with 44 deaths, but Nepal is far behind the West and the number of cases, and ultimately deaths, is certain to rise.Very few hospitals or health-workers in Nepal have any form of PPE, so Doctors For Nepal is currently hosting a silent online auction to purchase this much needed equipment to help protect our doctors, nurses, and students. Funds raised will be used to purchase PPE and ensure its distribution to our teams across Nepal. It is extremely challenging for us to raise funds in these extraordinary times as we try to help these forgotten communities, so If we succeed in raising over £5,000, the additional funds will go towards the continuing tuition fees of our students. Please do go to our website for more information.

3rd year DFN medical student Dhanendra has already been making his own efforts to find PPE.  He heard that health workers in his remote part of Nepal– Dailekh, Kalikot and Bajura – have no access at all to basic PPE. He really wanted to do something about this and was talking to his friend who is studying nursing in USA. Together they came up with a plan.

Dhanendra explains “I read news in national daily paper that health workers working in Bajura treating patients without PPE or even masks and that make me so sad. I shared the news with my friend in USA. We talked a lot on the phone and she told me that she can contribute if I can organise. Due to lockdown international flights are canceled and so it was impossible to send masks from USA. So what i did was I call to my friends who are living near city in Nepal. One of my friends sourced the masks in far west Dhangadhi. I called the shopkeeper and made a deal on the price – he was happy with 25 rupees per surgical mask. My friend on USA then put the money in the shopkeepers account and I arranged for a jeep to drive for 2 days to deliver the masks to my home town. We managed to deliver 1800 to 4 rural municipalities and 2 municipalities. It makes me very happy to do this.“

STUDENT NEWS: we are overjoyed to announce that 5th year medical students Apsara and Kamal have both passed their final year medical exams and are now our 5th and 6th Doctors For Nepal. HUGE CONGRATULATIONS to Dr Apsara and Dr Kamal - we are very, very proud of them. All their hard work over the past 5 years has paid off and they are both truly dedicated to serving the remote communities of Nepal. Both will now work as interns for a year at Patan Hospital in Kathmandu before hopefully finding jobs as doctors back in their remote regions.

Dhanendra sources PPE in Nepal
Dhanendra sources PPE in Nepal
Newly qualified Dr Apsara
Newly qualified Dr Apsara
Newly qualified Dr Kamal
Newly qualified Dr Kamal
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
 

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating.

Get Reports via Email

We'll only email you new reports and updates about this project.

Organization Information

Doctors for Nepal

Location: Hamsey, East Sussex - United Kingdom
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @DoctorsForNepal
Doctors for Nepal
Cesca Eaton
Project Leader:
Cesca Eaton
Eastbourne, East Sussex United Kingdom

Retired Project!

This project is no longer accepting donations.
 

Still want to help?

Find another project in Nepal or in Physical Health that needs your help.
Find a Project

Learn more about GlobalGiving

Teenage Science Students
Vetting +
Due Diligence

Snorkeler
Our
Impact

Woman Holding a Gift Card
Give
Gift Cards

Young Girl with a Bicycle
GlobalGiving
Guarantee

Sign up for the GlobalGiving Newsletter

WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.