Life-saving treatment for kids in Ukraine

by Charitable Foundation Zaporuka
Life-saving treatment for kids in Ukraine
Life-saving treatment for kids in Ukraine
Life-saving treatment for kids in Ukraine
Life-saving treatment for kids in Ukraine
Life-saving treatment for kids in Ukraine
Life-saving treatment for kids in Ukraine
Life-saving treatment for kids in Ukraine
Life-saving treatment for kids in Ukraine
Life-saving treatment for kids in Ukraine
Life-saving treatment for kids in Ukraine
Bohdan
Bohdan

Dear friends,

thank you for standing with Ukraine and supporting our children!

Your contributions make it possible to support seriously ill children and their families who are in evacuation abroad and those who remain for treatment in Ukraine. In Kyiv and Lviv hospitals, more than half of the patients come from either the occupied territories, or the territories, where active hostilities occur. Here, they receive the therapies they need and psychological support to overcome anxieties and adapt to a new life situation.

2-year-old Bohdan, diagnosed with rhabdomyosarcoma, came to Lviv from occupied Melitopol, Zaporizhzhia Oblast. His parents noticed something wrong with the child’s eye after the beginning of Russia’s invasion. At that time, their town was already under occupation.

The father had to make six  (!!!) attempts before he managed to go through the Russian checkpoint with the ill son. The mother was not allowed to go and had to remain in occupation. Firstly, they reached Zaporizhzhia, then Odesa, where Bohdan was urgently operated on to remove the tumor. The doctors managed to save his eye.   

For chemotherapy, Bohdan and his father went to Lviv. There, the father took care of his son during the most challenging days of treatment. At the same time, he couldn’t stop worrying about his wife, who remained in occupation and could not often get in touch because of connection problems. The boy missed his mom very much, and the father tried hard to be as supportive as possible, hugging his boy all the time and cuddling with him.   

Eventually, Bohdan’s mother managed to pass all the checkpoints and the family united. They received all the necessary support to be able to renew their lost documents and settle down in the Lviv Oblast.  Now, between therapies, Bohdan can leave the hospital and have a rest staying with his parents. The family is happy to be together. For sure, that’s one of the things that makes the boy’s treatment successful. Your support is the other. Thank you so much for being there for us now! 

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Alla and Arina in safety
Alla and Arina in safety

Dear friends,

thank you so much for supporting kids with cancer in Ukraine in time of war. 

Little Arina is one of such children who can receive treatment in safety thanks to your support. Last September, Arina was diagnosed with nephroblastoma, kidney cancer. She was on treatment in Kharkiv, East of Ukraine, when the war started. Now she is in the Lviv Hospital with her mom Alla who tells their story:

"When I first heard the diagnosis, I had the feeling that I was falling into an abyss. Why my Arina? What did I do wrong? Now I understand that cancer can happen to anyone. And that no one is to blame for that. But in the first days, I couldn’t find any rest. To distract me, I was gluing wallpapers in the house for four days. It helped.

My husband and I decided that he and Arina would be in the hospital, and I would be at home with our children. We have a big family: the eldest son Artem is 13, Katya 9, Polina 6, Arina 3. The youngest, Oleksii, has recently turned one year old. We always wanted to have a big family together as happiness for us was to be surrounded by children.

The beginning of the war found us at home between therapies. In the morning my aunt from Kyiv called me: "Alla, the war has started. They’re bombing Kyiv, Kharkiv, all over Ukraine." I realized the impending catastrophe on the second day, when the hospital where Arina was being treated was bombed. My first thought: "Where will my daughter receive treatment?"

I called our doctor and he told us that we had to leave immediately. We started looking for transport. At the same time, a volunteer told us that it was possible to go to Poland for treatment. Without hesitation, I agreed. We began to pack our things quickly. My husband found a van and we left. I was praying all the way. We got safely to Lviv, from where we were supposed to go to Poland.

In Lviv, where we could breathe a sigh of relief, I was no longer so happy with the idea of going abroad. I didn’t feel very comfortable in an unfamiliar city, but at least I was in my home country. Who knows what could happen in Poland, where we would be among strangers and without speaking the language? What about my children? My husband?  When I got to know that we could continue treatment in Lviv, the decision was final. We stayed in Ukraine. 

Now Arina and I have a few days of rest between chemo cycles. My daughter is cheerful. I look at her and try to imitate her. 

I really want to go home. For two months now, I have been dreaming of one thing – to go back and then cook a huge pot of homemade borscht  for the whole family. That’s all, I dont want anything else. Only peace, my family by my side, and borscht".

Your contributions make it possible to save kids’ lives in the most difficult time in Ukraine. Thank you so much for being there for us now! 

In the Lviv Hospital
In the Lviv Hospital
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Yeva and Artemchyk are safe now
Yeva and Artemchyk are safe now

Dear friends,

thank you for supporting the Ukrainian kids during this terrible war.

From the first days of war kids with cancer in Kyiv and all over the country were in danger because they either had to receive chemo in the basement of the hospitals or couldn’t receive it at all because necessary drugs couldn’t be delivered in time.

Our team has been working to organize the evacuation of as many children with serious diagnoses as possible. We are working from Kyiv, from Lviv and in Poland where children and parents are firstly transported. Then their destinations depend on the diagnosis and the hospitals’ availability.  In the picture you can see Yeva, diagnosed with brain tumor, and Artemchyk, diagnosed with leukemia, who are ready to fly to Italy with special medical flight.

However, still many patients remain in Ukraine. We are working in close contact with doctors who give  information what medicines are required urgently. With the help of our partners we receive medicines as humanitarian aid in Lviv and then our brave volunteers take dangerous roads to bring the medicines to Kyiv to save kids’ lives.

Your contributions make it possible to save kids’ lives in the most difficult time of the modern Ukrainian history. Thank you so much for being there for us now!  

Kids arrive in Italy
Kids arrive in Italy
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Little Marichka on treatment in Kyiv
Little Marichka on treatment in Kyiv

Dear friends,

thank you for supporting kids with cancer in Ukraine!

For us in Ukraine, now is a challenging time of fear and uncertainty. We know from experience that the threat of Russian aggression is real, but we don't know if and when it can happen. The atmosphere is tense, and people cannot feel safe. The kids we help feel this tension from their parents and start playing war games with toy weapons they find in the hospital's playroom and the family house run by us. Just look at the picture below we made one of these days. 

Our kids' families will also be affected by possible war. Little Marichka, you see in the picture, is on treatment in Kyiv for nephroblastoma, a kidney tumor, with her mom. Her dad is a combat veteran of the Russia-Ukraine war in Donbas. Now he stays in their home town supporting the family and taking care of Marichka's elder sister, who has to go to school. He visits Marichka in Kyiv quite often and helps his wife in every possible way. However, he will be deployed to defend Ukraine in case of escalation. And Marichka, who still has to undergo more than 20 chemo cycles, will have to fight for her life without him.

In 2021, thanks to your generous contributions, 469 children like Marichka received the help they needed: medicines, medical supplies for chemo and surgeries, endoprostheses, physical rehabilitation, and psychological support. We don't know what happens later in 2022, but we know that Ukrainian kids with cancer and their families need as many people as possible to be there for them this difficult year.

Toys kids play now
Toys kids play now
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Zaporuka's First Graders
Zaporuka's First Graders

Dear friends,

thank you for supporting kids with cancer in Ukraine!

Every year, in September, we celebrate our first graders. All the kids you see in the picture have started school this year. All of them are cancer survivors whom we helped when they were on treatment.

We watched Myron, Emilia, Daniela, Oleksandra, Vania, and many other kids grow at the Cancer Institute Pediatric Department andthe Family House Dacha. Now we are happy to see their pictures from school and get news about their achievements.

Myron was diagnosed with kidney cancer when he was just four months old. Treatment was long and complicated, with more than ten chemo cycles and surgery. As Myron’s mom says, the time of the disease was hard, but, with so many good people around, they managed to overcome it.

Emilia underwent complex pancreatic surgery at the Cancer Institute four years ago. It was one of those rare cases when the doctors suspected a malignant tumor, but, fortunately, it turned out to be benign. When her family received the test results, it was the happiest moment in their life.

Daniela received cancer diagnosis when she lived inthe Luhansk Oblast, the occupied territory, where there was no treatment available. She came to Kyiv and, between hospitalizations, stayed with her family at our Dacha house. When Daniela went into remission, her mom Olga was diagnosed with cancer too. Now both of them are survivors.

Oleksandra was on treatment at the Cancer Institute three years ago. At that time, our psychologists and volunteers, with whom the girl loved to spend time, were her consolation as she suffered being so far away from home, from her relatives and friends. Oleksandra’s mom says that the psychological support was a lifeline that helped their family to live through the disease.

Vania had a specifically located tumor, so it was impossible to remove it without the MIBG scan that was not available in Ukraine. We organized the exam for him in Italy. In 2021, Vania had to go for a follow-up checkup, and we managed to arrange a visit during the pandemic with the authorization of the Italian Ministry of Health. The scan confirmed that everything was fine. 

Your support makes it possible for these kids and many others to enjoy such important life event as starting school.

Thank you for helping kids in Ukraine survive cancer!

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Organization Information

Charitable Foundation Zaporuka

Location: Kyiv - Ukraine
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @_zaporuka
Project Leader:
Iana Dashkovska
Kyiv, Ukraine
$153,816 raised of $200,000 goal
 
1,859 donations
$46,184 to go
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