Hands-on science for 3500 underserved kids

by Science is Elementary
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Hands-on science for 3500 underserved kids
Hands-on science for 3500 underserved kids
Hands-on science for 3500 underserved kids
Hands-on science for 3500 underserved kids
Hands-on science for 3500 underserved kids
Hands-on science for 3500 underserved kids
Hands-on science for 3500 underserved kids
Hands-on science for 3500 underserved kids
Hands-on science for 3500 underserved kids
Hands-on science for 3500 underserved kids
Hands-on science for 3500 underserved kids
Hands-on science for 3500 underserved kids
Hands-on science for 3500 underserved kids
Hands-on science for 3500 underserved kids
Hands-on science for 3500 underserved kids
Hands-on science for 3500 underserved kids
Hands-on science for 3500 underserved kids
Hands-on science for 3500 underserved kids
Hands-on science for 3500 underserved kids
Hands-on science for 3500 underserved kids
Hands-on science for 3500 underserved kids

The year is off to a great start. Kindergarteners recently played Air Soccer by using straws to blow a ping-pong ball around a table and try to score a goal. In the process they learned that force has size and a direction and that we don't need to touch an object to move it. The classroom was full of shouts of "Gooaaaal!". 

Fourth graders learned about kinetic and potential energy. Using rulers and rubber bands, they observed that rubber bands that are released after being more stretched, fly faster and make a louder noise when they hit a pan, showing that potential energy and kinetic energy are related.

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We are excited to begin the new school year! This year we are working in six school districts.

We are recruiting and training new and returning volunteers. Volunteers are telling us that they love working with the kids, seeing their eyes light up when they arrive in the classroom, and as they ponder and understand new scientific concepts.

We are also welcoming 475 new students to our program! Most of them are Kindergarteners.

We'd appreciate your help in supporting these youngest learners. Will you make a contribution so that we can provide supplies for hands-on experiments for them?

Thank you for your support!

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The end of the school year is here and it's time to celebrate our students and plan for next year. Thank you notes from the students have been pouring into our office.  Tristan, a 1st grader wrote "Thank you for everything.  My favorite experiment was when we used the toothpick and marshmallow. I learned very amazing stuff."

Another student, Jahanara, drew a picture of her favorite teacher and wrote about the many experiments she loved.  

It was another amazing, inspiring year for bringing hands-on science to our local schools!

 This summer we'll work on:

  • Refreshing our curriculum
  • Analyzing student assessments
  • Finalizing schools for next year
  • And much more!

Thank you for your support this school year, we couldn't have done it without you!


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Spring has (almost) arrived in the Bay Area. Our third graders are learning about simple machines: inclined planes, levers, pulleys, and more. The thing simple machines have in common is that they reduce the force needed to movbe objects. How do they do that? What is the mathematical relationship that is common to all of them? Ask one of our third graders!

Our second graders just finished a unit on water - a very unique liquid! How can water move against gravity (capillary action)? Why does water bead up? What is it about the particles (molecules) of water that enable this? Ask one of our second graders!

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This fall we started working at two schools in Oakland: Acorn Woodland and Cox Academy. We are working with the schools' youngest students: Transitional Kindergarten (TK), Kindergarten, and First Grade!

TK students are learning about gravity ("gravity pulls everything down") and explore what happens when we let go of objects, when we throw them up, and when they roll down a ramp.

Kindergarteners play Simon Says Forces as they learn that forces have a size and a direction. They explore ways of using forces to change the speed of an object or its direction of motion.

First graders explore how different materials interact with light (opaque, transparent, translucent, reflective) and that in order for us to see an object, it must reflect light. The picture shows students modeling how light rays might reflect off a door and into our eyes so we can see the door.

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Organization Information

Science is Elementary

Location: Mountain View, CA - USA
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @SiEscience
Project Leader:
Tzipor Ulman
Mountain View, CA United States

Funded Project!

Combined with other sources of funding, this project raised enough money to fund the outlined activities and is no longer accepting donations.
   

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