You Can Save Israel's Unique Aquatic Habitats!

by The Tisch Family Zoological Gardens, the Biblical Zoo in Jerusalem
You Can Save Israel's Unique Aquatic Habitats!
You Can Save Israel's Unique Aquatic Habitats!
You Can Save Israel's Unique Aquatic Habitats!
You Can Save Israel's Unique Aquatic Habitats!
You Can Save Israel's Unique Aquatic Habitats!
You Can Save Israel's Unique Aquatic Habitats!
You Can Save Israel's Unique Aquatic Habitats!
You Can Save Israel's Unique Aquatic Habitats!
You Can Save Israel's Unique Aquatic Habitats!
You Can Save Israel's Unique Aquatic Habitats!
You Can Save Israel's Unique Aquatic Habitats!
You Can Save Israel's Unique Aquatic Habitats!
You Can Save Israel's Unique Aquatic Habitats!
You Can Save Israel's Unique Aquatic Habitats!
You Can Save Israel's Unique Aquatic Habitats!
You Can Save Israel's Unique Aquatic Habitats!
You Can Save Israel's Unique Aquatic Habitats!
You Can Save Israel's Unique Aquatic Habitats!
You Can Save Israel's Unique Aquatic Habitats!
You Can Save Israel's Unique Aquatic Habitats!
Photo credit: Dan Amichai
Photo credit: Dan Amichai

We are pleased to have opened a new exhibit in the Dead Sea section of the Four Seas Gallery.

The Dead Sea Tooth Carp (Aphanius richardsoni) is a unique species of killifish that lives in the freshwater springs, streams, pools and sinkholes of three fragmented areas near the #deadsea in both Israel and Jordan. It is found nowhere else in the world, and has been classified as critically #endangered on the IUCN Red List.

A breeding population for this species has been set up at the Aquarium to act as a backup or “ark” for the wild population given the fragile state of their habitat.

In Israel, it is found in a few small areas between Enot Zukim (En Fashkha) in the north to Ne'ot Ha'Kikar in the south. These areas are strongly impacted by water extraction which has dried out natural streams and ponds; low rainfall induced by climate change; and the decrease in Dead Sea water levels which causes severe damage to natural habitats.

Although the population in these areas number in the thousands, they are very unstable and population size has decreased drastically in Israel over the past 50 years.

The new exhibit
The new exhibit
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
The new exhibit design
The new exhibit design

The Dead Sea section of the Four Seas Gallery at the Aquarium will be fully renovated in the coming  weeks.

The upgrade will include the addition of a tank for the Dead Sea Tooth Carp - a unique species of killifish that lives in the freshwater springs, streams, pools and sinkholes of three fragmented areas near the Dead Sea in both Israel and Jordan.

It is found nowhere else in the world, and has been classified as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List. The Aquarium will establish a breeding nucleus for this species to act as a backup or “ark” for the wild population given the fragile state of its current habitat.

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

A few exciting changes planned in this new year at the Aquarium.

Firstly, Tank 33, the final tank on the circular route, which up until now has housed a school of red drum fish.

After two years of searching, we now have the stingrays: common, purple and cow-nose, which were part of the original zoological plan for this tank.

Following quarantine of the stingrays, a renovation of the tank and updating of the signs, the new exhibition will be opened to the public.

Secondly, the Dead Sea section on the Four Seas Gallery will be upgraded with the addition of a tank for the Dead Sea Tooth Carp - a unique species of killifish that lives in the freshwater springs, streams, pools and sinkholes of three fragmented areas near the Dead Sea in both Israel and Jordan.

It is found nowhere else in the world, and has been classified as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List. The Aquarium will establish a breeding nucleus for this species to act as a backup or “ark” for the wild population given the fragile state of its habitat.

Thirdly, we have started planning an exciting new exhibit, which will be in the area of tanks 16-18 (the clownfish (nemo) area) of nocturnal splitfin flashlight fish.

Splitfin flashlight fish have bean-shaped organs beneath their eyes that host light-producing bacteria. The fish can turn this light on and off by blinking, sending Morse code-like signals into the deep abyss.

In order to accommodate these fish, we will need to build a tunnel or partition which will allow them to be viewed in the dark.

We look forward to reporting on the completion of these new projects during the year.

 

Have a healthy winter, 

Rachael and the Aquarium Team

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Red Knob Starfish
Red Knob Starfish

The latest government regulations in Israel require that the Aquarium is operates under the 'Green Pass' system. This means that all visitors are required to show proof of vaccination, recovery from Covid, or a negative PCR test (for children over 3 years) before entry to the facility. 

The Aquarium staff are working hard to ensure an easy and smooth entry process for all our visitors.

As part of the efforts to complete and expand the zoological collection of the Aquarium, a large shipment from Kenya brought some new fish, stars, rays and even an octopus.  Included were red knobbed starfish, blue starfish and honeycomb rays.

In the past, we have received our octopuses from Israeli fisherman in the Mediterranean but in the past months, they have reported that all the octopuses seem to have gone done to depths below 50 m, making them more difficult to catch. The fisherman believe that this is a result of rising water temperatures this year, brought on by climate change.

The jellyfish exhibits in the Aquarium received a boost with the arrival of new moon jellies and Japanese sea nettles (Chrysaura pacifica) in a shipment from France.

Visitor viewing jellyfish
Visitor viewing jellyfish
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
The Coral Tank
The Coral Tank

One of the most important exhibits at the Gottesman Aquarium is the Coral Tank. This is the only exhibit which has real, live coral, the rest of the tanks having artificial coral displays.

Coral reefs are thought to be the equivalent of rainforests in terms of their importance to the environment, supporting an abundance of sea life.

In the Gulf of Eilat, in Israel's far south, scientists are studying why Israel's corals are proving to be more resilient to ocean warming that elsewhere in the world. The genetic reasons for their ability to survive the effects of global warming could be used to save and rehabilitate other reefs around the world.

The other month, the Aquarium rescued corals from the Red Sea that had been dislodged by construction work in the area and we were able to successfully integrate them into our coral tank. 

Corals are living organisms and it takes time for the interaction between the corals to reach a balance and some ten years for them to grow fully.

The Coral "safe" at the Aquarium allows us to educate the public about ocean conservation and to preserve these precious corals for future generations.

The new corals
The new corals
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
 

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating.

Get Reports via Email

We'll only email you new reports and updates about this project.

Organization Information

The Tisch Family Zoological Gardens, the Biblical Zoo in Jerusalem

Location: Jerusalem, Israel - Israel
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @BiblicalZoo
Project Leader:
Nicole Wexler
Jerusalem, Israel
$105,321 raised of $150,000 goal
 
381 donations
$44,679 to go
Donate Now
lock
Donating through GlobalGiving is safe, secure, and easy with many payment options to choose from. View other ways to donate

The Tisch Family Zoological Gardens, the Biblical Zoo in Jerusalem has earned this recognition on GlobalGiving:

Help raise money!

Support this important cause by creating a personalized fundraising page.

Start a Fundraiser

Learn more about GlobalGiving

Teenage Science Students
Vetting +
Due Diligence

Snorkeler
Our
Impact

Woman Holding a Gift Card
Give
Gift Cards

Young Girl with a Bicycle
GlobalGiving
Guarantee

Sign up for the GlobalGiving Newsletter

WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.