Apply to Join
 Education  India Project #25767

Give Them a Future: Educate a Tribal Girl in India

by Agragamee
Give Them a Future: Educate a Tribal Girl in India
Give Them a Future: Educate a Tribal Girl in India
Give Them a Future: Educate a Tribal Girl in India
Give Them a Future: Educate a Tribal Girl in India
Give Them a Future: Educate a Tribal Girl in India
Give Them a Future: Educate a Tribal Girl in India
Give Them a Future: Educate a Tribal Girl in India
Give Them a Future: Educate a Tribal Girl in India
Give Them a Future: Educate a Tribal Girl in India
Give Them a Future: Educate a Tribal Girl in India
Give Them a Future: Educate a Tribal Girl in India
Give Them a Future: Educate a Tribal Girl in India
Give Them a Future: Educate a Tribal Girl in India
Give Them a Future: Educate a Tribal Girl in India
Give Them a Future: Educate a Tribal Girl in India
Give Them a Future: Educate a Tribal Girl in India
Rasmita's essay on her beloved teacher.
Rasmita's essay on her beloved teacher.

When teachers love their children, they enjoy their work, and children reciprocate in full measure. In Agragamee School, we build up close ties with the children and the families of each of the children, and a deep bond is established with the children, their parents and the community. 

Children express their love and affection for us in different ways - sometimes, it is a quick hug, or it could be the little ones shouting out Guruma come to our class! or a bunch of them just coming and sitting down beside you in the teachers' room or office, curious, inquisitive, eager to share.......... 

As they grow older, some of them put down their feelings in writing, which is all the more precious, and treasured. We bring you here a small essay along with the illustration about Kanaka Guruma (Head Teacher), the Head Mistress of Agragamee School  by Rashmita, translated from Odiya.

“Kanaka Guruma is the Head Mistress of our school. Guruma teaches us very nicely. Guruma teaches mathematics, language, English etc. She likes us a lot. When Kanaka Guruma teaches us, we are able to understand very well. Kanaka Guruma likes us all a lot. Guruma teaches all the classes in our school very nicely. She takes care of every need of ours. During the morning prayer, she asks us to read newspapers. Then she explains the news to us. Kanaka Guruma gives us pencil, rubber, cutter, compass etc. if we are sick, or have other problems, Guruma takes us to the hospital. Kanaka Guruma is from Mayurbhanj District and teaches us very nicely. Kanaka Guruma puts Sindura on our foreheads and distributes coconut whenever she returns after puja in the temple.  If we do not understand our lessons, then Guruma explains them to us several times. Guruma has a son. Guruma is like my mother”

Rasmita,  Class V,

Rasmita passed out of Agragamee School last year, and is continuing her studies in a residential school for tribal girls. There are many more eager, young girls like Rasmita studying, learning, and dreaming of a bright career ahead. This has been possible because of your generous support to Agragamee School!


- Write us back at vidhyadas@agragamee.org

Rasmita and Kanaka Guruma, illustration by Rasmita
Rasmita and Kanaka Guruma, illustration by Rasmita
Female literacy in these tribal districts is 38%
Female literacy in these tribal districts is 38%
Group picture - Agragamee School Team
Group picture - Agragamee School Team
Innovative learning methods
Innovative learning methods

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Rupadhar (Tribal Education Supporter) and children
Rupadhar (Tribal Education Supporter) and children

"Rupadhar (Education Supporter) says Schools were mundane when he used to study (6 years ago) and they were deprived of colorful charts, toys or wall arts. Schools can be portrayed as dark rooms with blank walls and fear lingering around. Illustrated and colorful charts help classroom to look vivid and pleasing to children’s eyes." 

In a multi-grade classroom, it is important to find interesting ways to engage children while the teacher is involved in teaching other grades. This helps in preventing children's interest in education and school. Early graders are unable to decipher Regional language in these story charts as the regional language and tribal language are extremely dissimilar. Images help them visualize the story and relate symbols to weave new stories.

We reached Uparjhiri village, Odisha at 7.00 AM while Rupadhar was teaching children of I and II graders in School’s verandah. We found other children were involved in playing with toy cars and games. Rupadhar does not restrict the usage of toys and books unlike other schools in villages. It is often found that these toys are locked upon for bounding children to break them apart. In this school a sense of ownership and sharing among children is common. Walls are carefully illustrated with story charts, action charts, poem charts and others.

Moving around classroom we came across an impactful visual. A group of six girls was playing with their monkey soft toy facing the chart. After close observation we found, three of them were trying to read from the story chart and was helping each other to read. They were also constructing their own stories. Two idle girls were watching them read and trying to hear stories. With all this, they were laughing and playing with their soft toy too. The last one tried to read the chart about vegetables and leaves.

It is interesting to notice that these visual aids are encouraging them to read and to imagine and construct their own stories. These Teaching-Learning Methods is helping us to create a playful and lovable ambiance for children. 

Children and our education supporters belong to the same village and their community speaks Tribal language called "Pengo". They inspire each other to reach school on time and attend schools regularly. Chances are if Rupadhar is late to school, children will come and knock at his door. 

Speaking same tribal language helps children to look upon their teachers as immediate inspirations and studying an alien language becomes easier for them to comprehend. 

Understanding language with visual aid and friends
Understanding language with visual aid and friends
School with one Multi-grade classroom.
School with one Multi-grade classroom.

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Tiger Outwitted!
Tiger Outwitted!

School children love events and workshops which help to break the monotony of the daily routine. In Agragamee School, children also love to report on the events with lively illustrations which make the whole thing more attractive. We give below the translation of a report of a Writers' Workshop by Ranjita, a student of Class V. The workshop was conducted by Dr. Jitendra Das, awarded by 'Sahitya Academy' for his extensive contribution to children's literature. We also attach the image of her original writing in Odiya, along with an illustration: 

About the Story told to us by Jitendra Sir

On Sunday, 19.3.2017 Jitendra Sir, and his wife, Jayanti Guruma came to our school. Jitendra Sir, Jayanti Guruma, Bado Guruma, Director Sir, Kanaka Guruma and other teachers and Sirs were present.

Jitendra Sir asked Namita what was her name. She said my name is Namita. He asked Gita what she liked; singing, stories, playing or dancing. Gita replied she liked singing songs. Jitendra Sir asked Gita to sing a song. Gita sang ‘Sambalua’ (Caterpillar) song. Sir asked us who wants to be a girl and who wants to be a boy? Panjuri, Namita, Sangita, Dolly, Manisha raised their hands. Sir called them to him, Manjuri said that she would rather be a boy. Dolly said she was happy being a girl. Sangita also said she wanted to be a girl, so also Manisha. Sir asked each one of them to tell a story, Sangita told the story of a Mother and Son, Namita told the story of an Old man and Old woman, Panjuri told the story of a Snake and a Snake Charmer. After that Dolly told the story of a Brahmin and a tiger, Manisha told the story of Rabbit and Fox. Namita sang a song ‘Ehi Mati Ehi Pani Pabana’. Situn sang ‘Sango he Chalo Bano Ku Jiba’.

Then Sir made the picture of a log on a road, and asked us what it was. We identified it. Sir told us to return after lunch. So we returned to the big hall after lunch. Sir asked us to write about any topic we felt like. We wrote. Then he asked us riddles. We answered the ones we knew, and could not answer those we did not know. Then Sir asked us to write out riddles we knew. We wrote.

Then Sir asked us to listen to a story about ‘A lizard and a tiger’. There was a village. In that village, there were an old man and an old woman. The old man went to plough his land one morning. He found a tiger, which had a lizard in its nose. The old man was frightened. However, he told himself, I shall be brave, and not be afraid of this tiger. The tiger told him, I will not eat you, my belly is full. There is a lizard inside my nose, please pull it out. The old man said if I pull it out, you will eat me. The tiger said no I will not eat you. The old man pulled out the lizard. The tiger said do not tell anybody that I had a lizard in my nose. The old man assured that he will not tell anybody. The tiger went off to its cave.

The old woman brought food for the old man. The old man laughed out loudly. Old woman wanted to know why he was laughing. The old man said I had gone to plough the fields. There I found a tiger with a lizard in its nose. The tiger was twitching and tossing, so I removed the lizard from his nose. The old man also told the story to the village. In the night when the old man was sleeping, the tiger came. It lifted the man along with the cot, and was carrying him away to the jungle. The old man suddenly found there were trees around him. He looked down, and found that he was being carried away by the tiger. The old man caught hold of a branch, and managed to slip away and return home. The tiger felt the cot was lighter. He looked up and found the old man was not there. Wondering what to do, he went back to his cave.

And so I finish my tale.

1st part of Ranjita's report in Odiya
1st part of Ranjita's report in Odiya
Final Part of Ranjita's report
Final Part of Ranjita's report

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Rasmita's Annual Report
Rasmita's Annual Report

Mukta Gyana Kutira, Agragamee Vidyalaya are schools for girls from very poor families in the underdeveloped tribal districts of Odisha in India. These communities have never had school education, and find it very difficult to educate their children, as they cannot even monitor their classroom learning. Children from these communities do go to Government Schools, but they do not even learn to read and write at the end of middle school.

Our schools provide uniform, a wholesome meal, text books, and a stress free learning ambience for children who would have otherwise never had an opportunity for school learning in their life. As part of our commitment towards these lovely but much neglected children, Mukta Gyana Kutira has developed a pedagogy of teaching for first generation school students which helps them learn with ease and fun. We have  been pleasantly surprised time and again at how effective this model is, when little girls of 11, 12 and 13 years write stories and reports detailing things even better than many adults! These stories find place in their newsletter, Danagar Katha or stories from the hills, monthly wall magazines, as also in the Mukta Gyana Kutira Annual Report. 

Given the context of their communities, where the literacy rates are barely above 0%, these are achievements we are really proud and happy to show case. We are giving below a report written by Rasmita from Grade V. We are also attaching along with the images of her original writing in Odiya as this is a translation from the Odiya language. Rasmita's report in Odiya is really a great acheivement for our school, as her mother tongue is Kui and not Odiya. All over the tribal regions of Odisha, schools find it difficult to teach tribal children because of the language barrier. We feel truly happy we have been able to successfuly cross this barrier to help Rasmita and many other tribal girls like her.

What we Learnt In School This Year: Report by Rashmita, Grade V

The name of our School is Mukta Gyana Kutira, Agrgaramee Vidyalaya, Kashipur. The teaching is good in our school. We learn five subjects in our school these are Language, Maths, English, Science, and Social science. Here Prayer is at 9. After finishing prayer, we have general knowledge questions, and newspaper reading. Then the students’ attendance is counted. After the counting we go to our class. The classroom teaching starts at 10.00 ‘o’ clock. First of all language is taught. This was previously taught by Trinath Sir. After he left Kanaka Guruma (head teacher) is teaching us language. The topics include Ama Jatiya Dhwaja Ude Farafara (Our National Flag Is Flying High), Upajukta Besa Pakai Aasa (Come with Proper Dress), Nuakhai (New Rice Celebration), Phula (Flower), Maniaru Madam Curie, Japanara Anubhuti (Experiences in Japan), Dukhidhana Nilamanire (O poor Nilamani), Jethae Para Upakare (One who is in Service to Others), Biswasta Sathi Yantra Mane (Faithful Friendly Machines), Nain` Gala Aape Matha (Our Heads were Bowed), Kal Veria Kanduchhi (Kal Veria is Weeping), Sukhila Patrara Katha (the Story of a dry leaf), Utkalputra Pyari Mohan (the Proud Son of Utkal Province), Dalapati Pada Tumaku Sape (I offer the team-leader position to you), Desabhakta Laxman Nayak (Great Patriot Laxman Nayak), Aame Bharatara Sisu (We Are the Children of India).

I find these topics very interesting. We read the lessons, then we do various exercises which include writing the story, answering questions, and identifying the difficult words, the opposite words and sentence formation. In this way I have learnt many things. At 11.00 clock we have Mathematic lesson. This subject is taught by Kanaka Guruma. The lessons includes introduction to Numbers, addition and subtraction with 7-8 digit numbers, multiplication and division, average, LCM and HCM, simple profit and loss, percentage, interest and decimals, bracket, time and distance, area and perimeter, geometry and circle. I liked all these topics a lot.

Then the English class starts at 12.00 ‘o’ clock. Earlier, this subject was being taught by Trinath Sir and after he left Jyoti Didi is teaching that. First, we read the English story, then we note the difficult words for their meaning. We practice writing these word to remember them. The next day, we write the words with their meaning on the blackboard. If we are not able to spell or read properly, our Didi writes the pronunciation in Odiya, so that we can pick it up easily. All this has helped me learn English quickly.

At 1.00 ‘o’ clock we have our launch. Then we play for sometime and when our teachers have finished their lunch we go to our classrooms. Science is taught every Monday, Tuesday and Saturday. Previously Trinath Sir used to teach us this subject but after he left Kanaka Guruma teaches us. Social science is taught every Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. Soma Didi teaches this subject. We note down the points, which helps us to remember and recall when asked questions the next day in the classroom by her. The school closes at 4 ‘o’ clock. We celebrate Republic Day, Independence Day, Children’s Day, teachers’ day, Gandhi Jayanti and Annual Function every year.

Rashmita, Class V, Village: Katali, Mukta Gyana Kutir Kashipur, Rayagada

Illustration by Rasmita
Illustration by Rasmita
Illustration by Gomati
Illustration by Gomati
Illustration by Rajeeta Grade IV
Illustration by Rajeeta Grade IV
Illustration by Tulasi Grade V
Illustration by Tulasi Grade V
Illustration by Nilabati Grade V
Illustration by Nilabati Grade V
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
A Creative Writing Workshop
A Creative Writing Workshop

Give Them A Future: Tribal Education in India

 Project Report

 

The training program was animated, and lively, as all the Shiksha Sathies had much to share, and also learn, the first feed back day was very useful in encouraging all Shiksha Sathies to share their efforts, and achievements, and also describe the problems they faced. Most of the Shiksha Sathies spoke about children with behaviour and attention problems, including children who found it difficult to sit in class and would frequently run out of class, children who would be very quiet, and not participate in the activities, and children loosing their pencils frequently. They shared about the problems they faced due to extremely crowded class room situations, the need for skills in multi-grade teaching, and having to take up other teaching work, including language teaching.

They were also happy to report that despite these problems, they had made visible improvements in the Government Primary Schools where they worked. They had helped the children overcome their fear of schools and teachers. This had not only improved attendance but also made a significant difference in children’s participation in classroom activities. The classrooms were now filled with laughter, and chatter, and children came to school early looking forward to the learning activities of the day. Many teachers were proud to report that they came singing songs they had learnt in class. The most significant change that had come about was in the attitude of the Government School teachers. In 3 instances, the Shiksha Sathies reported that the teachers had developed keen interest in teaching, and no longer found their work boring. They were also keen to provide the books that had been designed for early grade reading by Agragamee for children in higher grades who were not able to read well. In all 18 schools, the teachers who had been irregular, became more regular, and took their work more seriously.

Agragamee’s efforts for helping children in remote tribal villages in India get quality education has been recognized by the State Government, who have invited them to take up work in Government Schools to upscale their model of teaching and teacher training.

The training programme described above is one of a series of training programmes helping 'Shiksha Sathies' or support teachers take up innovative and child centred methods of teaching in Government primary schools. These have provided a demonstration of a better teaching model for Government School teachers as well.

In a very short period of time, schools which had poor attendance, listless children, who came because they were compelled to have shown dramatic changes. Children now come to school with much enthusiasm, and tribal parents also feel that the school is helping children read, and learn.

Training has been one of the key factors in this effort. The training programmes carried out with the help of Professor Indira Vijay Simha from Azim Premji Uniersity, have helped to bring about a paradigm shift in the conceptual understanding, and thinking of the teachers. This quarter has focused on training, and organizing common forums for stakeholders, and building up contacts with the tribal community, as the schools have been closed for summer holidays.

Active support from donors has also served to draw the attention of the state government as well as the media to the problems affecting primary education in the tribal regions. It resulted in an involved and multi-stakeholder State Level Workshop for Reading and Language development in Tribal Regions on the 8th and 9th June, 2017. The participation of Government Secretaries, Academics from different universities, representatives from the tribal community, teachers, non-profit organizations, and funding agencies helped to draw everybody together to address the common cause of poor educational levels in the tribal regions.

Tribal regions in India have some of the lowest literacy rates in the world. Much concerted and combined work is required to bring quality education in these regions for first generation school children. We are really happy to be part of a large community with the help of GlobalGiving who are helping bring about positive change in the education scenario of the tribal regions.

 

Making TLM during a Training Workshop
Making TLM during a Training Workshop
Teacher Training in progress
Teacher Training in progress
Agragamee primer holds children's attention
Agragamee primer holds children's attention
Children eager for fun games in Rasijhiri school
Children eager for fun games in Rasijhiri school

Attachments: Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
 

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating.

Get Reports via Email

We'll only email you new reports and updates about this project.

Organization Information

Agragamee

Location: Kashipur, Orissa - India
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Agragamee
Achyut  Das
Project Leader:
Achyut Das
Mr.
Kashipur, Odisha India

Retired Project!

This project is no longer accepting donations.
 

Still want to help?

Find another project in India or in Education that needs your help.
Find a Project

Learn more about GlobalGiving

Teenage Science Students
Vetting +
Due Diligence

Snorkeler
Our
Impact

Woman Holding a Gift Card
Give
Gift Cards

Young Girl with a Bicycle
GlobalGiving
Guarantee

Sign up for the GlobalGiving Newsletter

WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.