Give Support to 800 Syrian Refugee Families

by Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe
Give Support to 800 Syrian Refugee Families
Give Support to 800 Syrian Refugee Families
Give Support to 800 Syrian Refugee Families
Give Support to 800 Syrian Refugee Families
Give Support to 800 Syrian Refugee Families
Give Support to 800 Syrian Refugee Families
Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe
Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe

The Syrian war is in its eleventh year. Living conditions remain catastrophic. According to the UN, 6.7 million people are displaced within the country. The humanitarian situation in Syria continued to deteriorate in 2021. 13.4 million people are in need of humanitarian assistance. This represents an increase of more than 2 million people in need of assistance (up 21%) compared to the previous year.

Aid measures
By creating income opportunities, the project makes an important contribution to food security. 60 people without vocational training are trained as seamstresses for eight months in a sewing center. In the first six months, they learn various patterns and sewing techniques, and in two additional months they are trained in important professional and business skills. A total of 14,000 winter jackets, 60,000 face masks and 2,500 sets of children's clothes are sewn and distributed to children and adults in camps or collective shelters. Subsequently, 40 dedicated beneficiaries will receive startup kits to either start their own business or equip their workplace in an existing textile factory. The beneficiaries are able to build a new livelihood with the training they acquire, while at the same time the clothing produced supports winter relief efforts for children in need.

Another project component provides vital humanitarian aid through cash-for-work: 180 men repair water channels and rehabilitate disused pipes. In return, they receive around 116 euros a month and are able to cover vital needs. In addition, 200 farmers benefit from the canal repairs. More than 1,100 women are also taking part in the cash-for-work program: they knit 2,800 sets of clothing at home and also receive 116 euros a month for this. In the first month, gloves, scarves and hats are knitted. In the second and third months, sweaters are knitted. The clothing is distributed to needy children and makes a further contribution to winter aid.

Complementing this, the project sponsors a community center and creates more shelter for those with special needs through community-based approaches. In addition to awareness-raising educational sessions, psychosocial assistance is also provided. For example, more than 270 group sessions and more than 100 individual sessions on psychosocial help are offered. More than 1,800 children can be cared for at the community center during the project period and sensitized to important topics such as hygiene, non-violent problem solving in a child-friendly manner or receive psychosocial support. The community center's services also include a mobile team that reaches a further 660 needy people in very remote areas.

Thank you very much for your continuous support of the People in and around Syria.

Yours, Michael Tuerk

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Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe
Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe

The Syrian war is in its eleventh year. Living conditions remain catastrophic. According to the UN, 6.7 million people are displaced within the country. The humanitarian situation in Syria continued to deteriorate in 2021. 13.4 million people are in need of humanitarian assistance. This represents an increase of more than 2 million people in need of assistance (up 21%) compared to the previous year.

What we do
By creating income opportunities, the project makes an important contribution to food security. People without vocational training are trained as seamstresses for eight months in a sewing center. In the first six months, they learn various patterns and sewing techniques, and in two additional months, they are trained in important professional and business skills. Winter jackets, face masks and  sets of children's clothes are sewn and distributed to children and adults in camps or collective shelters. Subsequently, beneficiaries will receive startup kits to either start their own business or equip their workplace in an existing textile factory. The beneficiaries are able to build a new livelihood with the training they receive, while at the same time the clothing produced supports winter relief efforts for children in need.

Complementing this, the project promotes a community center and creates more protection for people with special needs through community-based approaches. In addition to awareness-raising educational sessions, psychosocial assistance is also provided. For example, group sessions and individual sessions on psychosocial help are offered. More than 1,800 children can be cared for at the community center during the project period and sensitized to important topics such as hygiene, non-violent problem solving in a child-friendly manner or receive psychosocial support. The community center's services also include a mobile team that reaches out to other needy people in very remote areas.

Please stay strong and continue to support us in these uncertain times.

Yours

Michael Tuerk

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Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe
Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe

10 Years of conflict

After more than ten years of war, there is hardly any media coverage of the living situation of the people in Syria. The Syrian conflict has become a forgotten catastrophe. And this despite the fact that more than 14 million inhabitants are now dependent on humanitarian aid - more than ever before. 600,000 children in Syria are chronically malnourished. We are continuing our aid projects in Syria and neighboring countries. A particular focus is on winter aid, as the cold winter months further exacerbate the plight of the population.

The situation of the more than 6.7 million internally displaced persons in Syria is particularly difficult. They often live in completely overcrowded camps or under catastrophic conditions in ruined buildings and destroyed houses. These living conditions also affect people's health. They fall ill with measles, typhoid fever and severe diarrhea. The Corona pandemic poses an additional challenge to the suffering population - there is hardly any testing capacity, not to mention protective clothing or respirators.


"More and more people are suffering from hunger"

Eighty percent of Syrians now live below the poverty line, and some 2.5 million children do not go to school. "The need for aid has continued to rise since last year. In addition to protective shelter, families increasingly lack sufficient food," reports Isabelle Freimann, Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe's project officer for Syria. "More and more people are suffering from hunger."
How Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe is helping

Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe is on the ground helping: together with our Syrian partners, we are taking care of restoring housing for internally displaced people. Many of those affected have already been displaced several times during the conflict, which has lasted for more than ten years. In the cold winter months, many families lack heating oil and warm clothing.

Together with its Syrian partners, Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe has therefore developed cash-for-work programs, for example, in which people are trained so that they can then work independently and earn money.

Thank you for the strong support, even in times when this conflict isn't present in media.

 

Yours

 

Michael Tuerk

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Children carry drinking water into their tents.
Children carry drinking water into their tents.

It has become quiet around Syria. After more than ten years of war, there are hardly any media reports about the living situation of the people in the country - the Syrian conflict has become a forgotten crisis.
The years of war have destroyed the livelihoods of the population and permanently damaged the agricultural infrastructure. Repeated displacements and ever new hotbeds of conflict have taken a heavy toll on the people's powers of resistance. Where the world public hardly looks anymore, more than 13.4 million inhabitants are now dependent on humanitarian aid - more than ever before.

The situation of the more than 6.7 million internally displaced persons is particularly difficult: they often live in completely overcrowded camps or under catastrophic conditions in ruined buildings and destroyed houses. These living conditions also affect people's health. There are increasing reports of measles, typhoid fever and severe diarrheal diseases. The Corona pandemic is putting the suffering

population faces another challenge - there is hardly any testing capacity, not to mention protective clothing or respirators.
80 percent of the population now lives below the poverty line, and some 2.5 million children do not attend school. "The need for assistance has continued to grow since last year. In addition to shelter, many families increasingly lack sufficient food," reports Isabelle Freimann, Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe's project manager for Syria. "More and more people are suffering from hunger.

Where there is silence, there is also hope

Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe is continuing its aid projects in Syria. A particular focus is on winter aid, as the plight of the population is once again significantly exacerbated in the cold winter months. Due to the economic crisis and the massive devaluation of the Syrian pound, many families can afford neither warm clothing nor heating oil to protect them from the cold.
Together with its Syrian partners, the relief organization is implementing a cash-for-work program, for example, in which caps, scarves and winter clothing for children are produced. In addition, housing for internally displaced persons is being restored so that families who have been displaced several times can finally feel safe again.

Please support us in winter aid.

Thank you so much, yours

Michael Tuerk

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Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe
Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe

Mohammed's small, two-story house was damaged when a mortar shell hit the neighboring house. Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe enabled him to repair the house with a metal roof. The 57-year-old father of four is visibly grateful for this.

Before the war, Mohammad worked as a building contractor. He was therefore able to lend a hand and, together with his son, set up a small but beautiful second apartment on the upper floor. His son and his future bride will move in there after their wedding. The small house is located in a huge garden in the middle of old Homs. Mohammed has cleared the garden of debris as best he could and is keeping chickens there again. He also grows vegetables, flowers, lemon and orange trees. To protect the garden, our partnerorganisation staff also helped him rebuild the old brick wall, which was also hit by mortars.

When asked why he puts so much time and effort into his garden, Mohammad jokes, "Others spend their money on cigarettes, I spend it on my garden and produce fruit." As a gift, he picks lemons from a tree in his garden and distributes them to the visiting team from our partner and Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe.

We are very encuraged by stories like this to continue and strenghen our work in Syria. If you think the same please support us with your donation. For the people in Syria.

 

Thank you so much.

 

Yours Michael Tuerk

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Organization Information

Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe

Project Leader:
Michael Tuerk
Corporate Fundraising Manager
Berlin, Germany
$43,143 raised of $52,430 goal
 
504 donations
$9,287 to go
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