Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger

by Wildlife Trust of India
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Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger

Project Report | Dec 17, 2023
Sundarbans Triumph: Guiding a Royal Bengal Tiger Home

By Monica Verma | Project Leader

The Male Royal Bengal Tiger Heading Home To Safety
The Male Royal Bengal Tiger Heading Home To Safety

Greetings from Wildlife Trust of India!

Today's highlights come from the Sundarbans delta in West Bengal, home to the world's only mangrove forest inhabited by tigers. This vast region also stands as the single largest continuous habitat for tigers across Asia.

Within the forests of the Indian Sundarbans reside approximately 100 tigers, while around 270,000 people inhabit the 46 forest fringe mouzas. Sixty-four percent of this population relies on collecting fish, crabs, and honey from the jungle for their livelihoods. This interdependence poses a constant risk of tiger attacks, leading to human-tiger conflicts that prove detrimental to both parties.

In a significant feat on December 11, 2023, the Wildlife Trust of India’s (WTI) Rapid Response Team (RRT) successfully guided a male Royal Bengal Tiger, initially spotted near human habitation, back to safety within the protected area of Sundarbans National Park. This remarkable achievement, vital for both human safety and tiger preservation, unfolded in the fringe forests of Bhubaneshwari village block. Tiger presence in the region posed imminent threats to both villagers and the tiger.

The intricate waterways surrounding the area presented a formidable challenge to the rescue team, necessitating strategic and collaborative efforts. WTI’s Primary Response Team (PRT) and Rapid Response Team (RRT) units worked relentlessly in tandem with the Forest Department to navigate the labyrinth of narrow channels and dense vegetation.

Despite deploying drones for the preliminary survey of the region, the dense mangrove canopy proved challenging. Undeterred, the team, displaying both patience and expertise, meticulously patrolled the area on foot and boat, eventually locating the stranded tiger through fresh pugmarks. Ensuring the tiger's safe passage, the ground team fenced the area with a nylon net, avoiding the need for capture.

The well-executed plan involved two days of careful preparation, with the final driving operation initiated on December 11. Led by the Forest Department and WTI’s RRT and PRT members, a team of volunteers closed in on the tiger, strategically shifting the nylon nets for safety. After all the efforts, the tiger was eventually guided across the river, and back into the safety of the National Park, symbolizing the successful culmination of this challenging rescue mission.

This incident underscores the delicate balance between humans and tigers in ecosystems like the Sundarbans. Collaborative efforts and deep respect for the natural world are imperative for ensuring the coexistence of these remarkable creatures and human communities. WTI’s PRT units, serving as a bridge between the community and the forest department, continue to play a pivotal role in handling such situations, contributing positively to human-tiger conflict resolution.

We would like to extend our heartfelt thanks to you. Your unwavering support makes such impactful interventions possible. Your commitment to wildlife conservation echoes in moments like these, where communities and this charismatic apex predator thrive together.

Warm regards,

Team WTI

Local Community; the people of Sundarbans
Local Community; the people of Sundarbans
Tracing the stranded tiger
Tracing the stranded tiger
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Nov 20, 2023
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By Monica Verma | Project Leader

Sep 2, 2023
Strengthening anti-poaching camp of Peechi wildlife division, Kerala

By Monica Verma | Project Leader

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Organization Information

Wildlife Trust of India

Location: Noida, Uttar Pradesh - India
Website:
Project Leader:
Monica Verma
Noida , Uttar Pradesh India
$119,666 raised of $150,000 goal
 
1,993 donations
$30,335 to go
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