Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger

by Wildlife Trust of India
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Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger

“Children are the living messages we send to a time we will not see”

-        John F. Kennedy

Dear Patron,

 ‘Munna’, the iconic tiger from Kanha Tiger Reserve in the state of Madhya Pradesh reached young children through an illustrated book. Madhya Pradesh Tiger Foundation Society (MPTF) curated a 32-page booklet on the life of a tiger titled “Baghon ki kahani, Munna ki zubani” (The story of tigers as narrated by Munna). The book was a joyride for the children in the age group of 10-12. This handy little edition is full of colored photos and caricatures of tigers in their natural environment. It covers interesting information about the species and its conservation status.   

Photos from wildlife photographers, text in the regional language (Hindi), and interesting caricatures of flora and fauna make this attractive to the target audience which is young school children. Munna’s first person account in a style that resonates with children of this age group explains tiger behavior, biology, threats to conservation and tiger corridors.

The book is meant to be distributed to school kids across all Tiger Reserves and Protected areas of Madhya Pradesh. MPTF planned to print 30,000 copies of which we assisted in printing 10,000 copies. The books were distributed across 16 conservancies, 6 Tiger reserves and 3 major Protected Areas – Kuno, Ratapani and Nauradehi Wildlife Sanctuaries— of Madhya Pradesh

WTI has been working in the Vidarbha landscape in Madhya Pradesh to ensure connectivity of tiger habitats. We have trained and equipped frontline forest staff across India to ensure protection of the species. Anti-snare walks, anti-poaching initiatives, ex gratia assurance to forest staff and working with communities in tiger landscapes are some of the key strategies implemented by WTI for holistic conservation.

We would like to thank you for supporting our project and such wonderful initiatives. With your support, we hope to continue the good work. We will keep sending similar updates to you. Until then, stay safe and take care.

Warm regards

Team WTI

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Hi Friend,

Hope you are safe and taking necessary precautions amidst the Covid-19 crisis.

We however, have some good news for you. After brainstorming for months to solve the disbursement issue, we have finally come up with a solution. Our fiscal partner has transferred the GlobalGiving funds to us a couple of days back.

We thank you for believing in our work and continuing to support us throughout the disbursement process. We look forward to doing better work on field with your support.

We will get back to you shortly with an exciting update from field.

Till then, take care, be safe.

Best Wishes,

Avrodita

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Dear Friend, 

We at Wildlife Trust of India, wish you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. 

As you might have been aware by now, Indian NGOs have been facing an issue with disbursement of funds from GlobalGiving. Disbursements have been stalled since July.

While GlobalGiving is constantly looking out for ways to mend this issue, we are facing a little difficulty in meeting our expenses, because of which our field work is getting affected.

However, do not worry. Your donations will reach us, hopefully soon. Please continue to support us. Your contribution goes a long way in conserving biodiversity.

We hope to bring you an exciting update from our field soon.

Till then, let us hope for the best. Sending you good wishes for the festivities.

Best Wishes,

Avrodita Chakladar

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Dear Friend,

Hope you are having a good day. We at Wildlife Trust of India have been ever grateful for the support and faith you have shown in our work. It is because of you that we have been able to work towards conserving biodiversity and mitigating threats that loom over nature and its associated species. However, of late we and other non-profit organizations registered in India have been facing an issue regarding receiving funds from GlobalGiving. We speculate there might have been an order issued by the Ministry of Home Affairs, Government of India, which has led to this disruption. GlobalGiving has been of immense support to us and has been trying tirelessly to come up with a suitable solution to this problem.

As you know, we are a conservation-action organization and our work stems from the efforts on ground, which in turn is largely dependent on the fund inflow. This temporary suspension in disbursement of funds has affected our work. We decided to apprise you, our supporters about the problem we have been facing since the past couple of months.

We are hopeful that this issue would be resolved soon. Please continue to support us and our work. Do not worry, all your contribution would reach us. GlobalGiving is making sure of that. We would be back with an update on our work very soon. Till then, please keep supporting us.

Best Wishes,

Avrodita

For Team Wildlife Trust of India

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Recovered snares
Recovered snares

Hello Supporter,

Wildlife crime has been a persistent threat to the mighty Bengal tiger. They are poached indiscriminately for their skin and other body parts. This month, we narrate to you our experience of dealing with snares- a tool to trap and kill animals.

A ductile metal is always considered to be a property of added advantage until wires were used as snares to choke our magnificent tigers and other wildlife, with a slow and painful death. In the last decade, as per records India has witnessed twenty-four tigers and hundred and ten leopards getting entangled in wire snares. States like Uttarakhand, Karnataka and Madhya Pradesh have been high on the snare radar. Snares are low investment traps made of easily available material such as clutch wires, fencing wire and others.  Being light weight and easy to carry around, make them the most effective way of trapping an animal without its notice.

Recently this June in Tipeshwar Wildlife sanctuary, a tiger was sighted limping with a nylon rope entangled in its paw. This raised some serious concerns across all tiger reserves in India. Wildlife Trust of India (WTI) has been consistently conducting anti-snare walks with the forest department and local organisations in Karnataka, Chhattisgarh and other states. Alarmingly, within a span of two months’ field teams have been able seize/destroy over 400 snares from a single landscape, which shows the rampant use of snares by hunters and the sad plight of our wildlife in their habitat.

Team WTI has been training the forest department’s frontline staff and involving local communities in the anti-snare workshops to help conduct regular anti-snare walks across landscapes. We are also working with selected people from the local hunting community who help share their traditional hunting insights with the forest department and thereby assist in identifying potential trapping sites and snaring techniques.

Many such anti-snare walks and workshops are being planned in wildlife habitats. We are eternally grateful for the support that our GlobalGiving family has lent us.  It is because of your faith in us that we can dream of securing the natural heritage of the country. As we continue resolving the threats looming over the tiger population, your support would be most sought after.

Best,

Team WTI

Forest officials with recovered snares
Forest officials with recovered snares
Tigress in Sal Forest
Tigress in Sal Forest
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Wildlife Trust of India

Location: Noida, Uttar Pradesh - India
Website:
Project Leader:
Monica Verma
Noida, Uttar Pradesh India
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