Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger

by Wildlife Trust of India
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Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger
Vanishing Stripes: Save the Bengal Tiger

Dear Friend, 

We at Wildlife Trust of India, wish you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. 

As you might have been aware by now, Indian NGOs have been facing an issue with disbursement of funds from GlobalGiving. Disbursements have been stalled since July.

While GlobalGiving is constantly looking out for ways to mend this issue, we are facing a little difficulty in meeting our expenses, because of which our field work is getting affected.

However, do not worry. Your donations will reach us, hopefully soon. Please continue to support us. Your contribution goes a long way in conserving biodiversity.

We hope to bring you an exciting update from our field soon.

Till then, let us hope for the best. Sending you good wishes for the festivities.

Best Wishes,

Avrodita Chakladar

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Dear Friend,

Hope you are having a good day. We at Wildlife Trust of India have been ever grateful for the support and faith you have shown in our work. It is because of you that we have been able to work towards conserving biodiversity and mitigating threats that loom over nature and its associated species. However, of late we and other non-profit organizations registered in India have been facing an issue regarding receiving funds from GlobalGiving. We speculate there might have been an order issued by the Ministry of Home Affairs, Government of India, which has led to this disruption. GlobalGiving has been of immense support to us and has been trying tirelessly to come up with a suitable solution to this problem.

As you know, we are a conservation-action organization and our work stems from the efforts on ground, which in turn is largely dependent on the fund inflow. This temporary suspension in disbursement of funds has affected our work. We decided to apprise you, our supporters about the problem we have been facing since the past couple of months.

We are hopeful that this issue would be resolved soon. Please continue to support us and our work. Do not worry, all your contribution would reach us. GlobalGiving is making sure of that. We would be back with an update on our work very soon. Till then, please keep supporting us.

Best Wishes,

Avrodita

For Team Wildlife Trust of India

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Recovered snares
Recovered snares

Hello Supporter,

Wildlife crime has been a persistent threat to the mighty Bengal tiger. They are poached indiscriminately for their skin and other body parts. This month, we narrate to you our experience of dealing with snares- a tool to trap and kill animals.

A ductile metal is always considered to be a property of added advantage until wires were used as snares to choke our magnificent tigers and other wildlife, with a slow and painful death. In the last decade, as per records India has witnessed twenty-four tigers and hundred and ten leopards getting entangled in wire snares. States like Uttarakhand, Karnataka and Madhya Pradesh have been high on the snare radar. Snares are low investment traps made of easily available material such as clutch wires, fencing wire and others.  Being light weight and easy to carry around, make them the most effective way of trapping an animal without its notice.

Recently this June in Tipeshwar Wildlife sanctuary, a tiger was sighted limping with a nylon rope entangled in its paw. This raised some serious concerns across all tiger reserves in India. Wildlife Trust of India (WTI) has been consistently conducting anti-snare walks with the forest department and local organisations in Karnataka, Chhattisgarh and other states. Alarmingly, within a span of two months’ field teams have been able seize/destroy over 400 snares from a single landscape, which shows the rampant use of snares by hunters and the sad plight of our wildlife in their habitat.

Team WTI has been training the forest department’s frontline staff and involving local communities in the anti-snare workshops to help conduct regular anti-snare walks across landscapes. We are also working with selected people from the local hunting community who help share their traditional hunting insights with the forest department and thereby assist in identifying potential trapping sites and snaring techniques.

Many such anti-snare walks and workshops are being planned in wildlife habitats. We are eternally grateful for the support that our GlobalGiving family has lent us.  It is because of your faith in us that we can dream of securing the natural heritage of the country. As we continue resolving the threats looming over the tiger population, your support would be most sought after.

Best,

Team WTI

Forest officials with recovered snares
Forest officials with recovered snares
Tigress in Sal Forest
Tigress in Sal Forest
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Tiger Seminar Memento, Photo Credit: Dr Sudip
Tiger Seminar Memento, Photo Credit: Dr Sudip

Dear Supporter,

The national animal of India has admirers all throughout the globe. We have received considerable support for our Bengal Tiger project and we are extremely thankful to GlobalGiving for connecting us with passionate individuals like you. This month, our update focuses on how sensitization of the urban population, especially the youth can fuel long-term conservation efforts. We bring to you an activity from West Bengal, a state that harbours one of the most unique and conducive habitats for the mighty Bengal Tiger.

The cluster of islands at the convergence of the mighty river Ganges, Brahmaputra and Meghna form the “Sundarban Tiger Reserve”. They represent the world’s largest mangrove habitat and lie between West Bengal (India) and Bangladesh. These fragile tidal creeks hold an array of species, both rare and endangered. Noted ones like the Royal Bengal Tiger (Panthera tigris), Gangetic river dolphin (Platanista gangetica gangetica), estuarine crocodile (Crocodilus porosus), small-clawed otter (Aonyx cinereus), marsh mongoose (Herpestes palustris) and others are harboured in this UNESCO World Heritage site. Along with 103 tigers (2015 Tiger census record India) the mangroves are also home to 4.5 million people. As per records, between 2010 and 2017, there have been 52 human deaths due to tiger attacks in the landscape. The main occupation of the fringe communities is fishing, honey and timber collection, which often compel them to often venture out into the swamps, bringing them dangerously close to tigers. Apart from the antagonism faced by local communities due to the daily threats they face on field, it Is sadly the lurking stories of man-eaters and the danger around tigers that the urban population of any city immediately relates to. The lack of exposure to nature and wildlife often makes people turn a blind eye to our unique and biodiverse Natural Heritage.

Along with conservation initiatives carried out with communities directly affected by Tigers, it is important to engage the urban sector and sensitize them on the current conservation issues and the threats Tigers in India face. Sensitizing students always plays a vital role in voicing ideas to older generations and the future. While on one hand, most Asian cultures have historically admired the tiger for its energy, strength and courage, on the other hand, tales of trophy hunting and man-eaters still give jitters to people. To cumulate the varied emotions towards this majestic species, Wildlife Trust of India supported a seminar titled “TIGERS” organised by a reputed autonomous college “Ramakrishna Mission Vidyamandira”, affiliated to the University of Calcutta. The seminar was organised by the Department of English to create an interest on Tigers and its significance across all disciplines ranging from science, art to literature. There was active participation of over 100 students from various universities and colleges across West Bengal and other states. The students were given the opportunity to submit proposals related to their respective disciplines keeping “Tigers” as the theme of interest. From the excellent response received, the best thirty papers and six posters were selected. The selected students were asked to present their research findings to the assembled audience. Eminent guests such as Newspaper editors, authors and professors were invited for the seminar. Mr Shiv Sahay Singh, Assistant Editor of The Hindu as the Chief guest, eminent author Anjana Basu and well-known Graphic Designer, Dr Pinaki De were some of the speakers invited to talk to the students on their areas of expertise. As a token of appreciation to all students presenting papers and posters, the book titled “Tiger by the Tale” by Venita Coelho was awarded to each. This book also reads about the cases of missing tigers in the Sundarbans Landscape and the stories behind them. The seminar helped as a creative gathering of students and professors celebrating our National Animal.

We hope to conduct more such activities in urban sectors to interact with students on India’s Wildlife. Along with such sensitization workshops and seminars, Wildlife Trust of India has also initiated a long term project to engage with the Sundarban landscape community and understand the ground realities to help mitigate the Human-Tiger conflict in the region. As we move forward and address critical conservation threats, your support would be most sought after.

Best Wishes,

Team WTI

Tiger Seminar Participants Photo Credits: Dr Sudip
Tiger Seminar Participants Photo Credits: Dr Sudip
Tiger Seminar, Photo Credits: Dr Sudip
Tiger Seminar, Photo Credits: Dr Sudip
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Tiger killed by snare
Tiger killed by snare

2018 has been an increasingly tense period for Tigers all over the world. Beginning with China loosening their ban on the trade of tiger bones to shooting of T1 Tigress, Avni mother of two cubs in Maharashtra, to name a few have raised some serious concerns for the majestic species survival. According to National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) till December 2018 there were 95 tiger deaths in the country. Shockingly, 41 out of the 95 cases were reported outside Tiger Reserves.

Maharashtra, home to 190 tigers as per the 2014 Tiger census accounted for 14 tiger deaths in 2018 with more than 70% occurring outside Protected Areas. The states Madhya Pradesh and Karnataka closely followed with 22 and 15 tiger deaths respectively. Tigers are constantly running out of space and spilling out of Tiger reserves, (imaginary boundaries dictated by us) into villages and highways bringing them in conflict with humans. Apart from poaching and hunting, the constant fear of livestock depredation and being attacked by a meandering carnivore lead to retaliation among communities.

To tackle this issue, Wildlife Trust of India (WTI) has been constantly working with fringe communities of Tiger Reserves and equipping frontline forest staff to help monitoring and safeguard tiger habitats. WTI works to prevent crime against wildlife in India by addressing issues like poaching and hunting. Since 2011, WTI has been regularly conducting anti-snare walks in Karnataka and recently in Chhattisgarh. These are joint operations with the forest departments to identify and remove snares. These walks are organised along park boundaries along with selected youth from the communities. Along with capacity building, WTI also conducts awareness workshops and regular meetings with village communities on conflict mitigation strategies near Tiger Reserves. We are currently carrying out awareness workshops near Maharashtra where due to the lack of awareness people approach tigers at very close quarters. To add on, the communication gap between the forest department and community makes it more challenging to crowd-control and monitor transient tigers of the landscape.

As we have stepped onto a New year, we hope to put an end to the atrocities on India's National Animal. In this journey of ours, your support will be most sought after. Global Giving has been our pillar of strength and we at WTI could not be thankful enough. With the onset of 2019, let us join hands and make the world a better place to live in.

Tiger in Bandipur, Southern India
Tiger in Bandipur, Southern India
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Wildlife Trust of India

Location: Noida, Uttar Pradesh - India
Website:
Project Leader:
Monica Verma
Noida, Uttar Pradesh India
$87,119 raised of $90,000 goal
 
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