Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired

by INABLE, CORP
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Computer Labs for the Blind and Visually Impaired

A recent interview with a local radio station focused on the power of education and technology for the blind and visually impaired. Edwin, a beneficiary of the inABLE Computer Labs for the Blind Program, shared that the computer lessons boosted his dreams to pursue music. Using assistive technology such as screen readers (NVDA) and Talkback, he was able to learn how to play musical instruments, such as piano and guitar. Edwin would sometimes listen to YouTube videos that taught him how to play piano during the inABLE computer labs session. He confesses, “The computer labs were such a gate-away for me and luckily, I was able to understand the basics quickly. I was always interested in music and I really needed to know how to play the piano. For me, the computer classes were another chance for me to learn a few extra music lessons. I may have been cheeky, but that has really paid off in the end”.   

Edwin’s life is a true testimony to Benjamin Franklin’s saying that an investment in knowledge pays the best interest. Today, despite being blind, Edwin is a musician who plays a number of musical instruments including piano and guitar, and he also enjoys singing. He now has his own personal YouTube channel to teach basic piano skills, as well as display his musicality with a music band he formed with a group of friends. 

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At the new inABLE internship program it has been one month since Delvin, a 20-year old low vision high school graduate, began advancing her computer skills. Prior to this internship opportunity, Delvin participated in the inABLE computer-labs-for-the-blind program for three years at St. Lucy’s primary and high school. Now she’s focused on improving her coding competencies.

“For the past month, I have been taught about HTML, CSS, and bootstrap framework.  As of now, I can confidently work with HTML and CSS; and am still learning bootstrap in detail. My goal is to perfect in my coding and accessibility work by the end of the internship so that I am ready to take on new lessons and responsibilities.” Delvin

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Collins who has low vision due to Albinism, was among the special-needs student in Kenya who had the opportunity to benefit from the inABLE Computer-labs-for-the-Blind program. For eight years, Collins attended the computer lessons provided by inABLE in partnership with the Thika Primary School for the Blind. During this period he was very committed, disciplined, and self-driven. Collins excelled in coding class and participated in peer-to-peer training, where he helped other blind and visually impaired students improve their understanding the computer concepts.

During his primary-school education, Collins achieved good grades and was admitted into the Aquinas Boys High school, which an integrated school that admits students with special needs. Despite his vision challenges, Collins managed to beat all odds to score a very good grade of A- in the Kenya certificate of Secondary Education test. This achievement will help him fulfill his goal of attending a good University of his choice to work toward his dream of becoming a medical doctor.

Collins ‘ high exam performance was recently highlighted on one of the leading local TV stations.

As an organization, inABLE, is bursting with pride at the accomplishments of all of our students, including today the most capable and ambitious Collins. We join the loud chorus of praise to congratulate Collins and his family. And look forward to the day when Collins is living his dream.

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MasterCard Visit_Computer Lab
MasterCard Visit_Computer Lab

As the 2019 curtain comes down with a few weeks left to cross over to a new a new year, inABLE.org was fortunate to host a team of guests from a globally respected organization MasterCard Foundation.

MasterCard Foundation representatives Andrew Kaylee Stewart and Andrew Okuzuwa joined inABLE Board Member Joe Kiarie, Tangaza University College Lecturer Brenda Kiema, and inABLE Business Development Manager George Siso joined on a tour of the inABLE computer labs at the Thika Primary School for the Blind. They were all briefed about inABLE’s work toward its mission to empower blind and visually impaired youths in Africa through computer assistive technology. And discussed how the blind and low vision students learn to use the computers and the benefits of computer literacy.

The enthusiastic group engaged with the students, who were busy in the inABLE computer lab doing different assignments, including typing or using Microsoft office word application to coding using basic HTML. Our guests heard about the learning process from the students themselves and also observed how the students utilized different software applications on the computers.

Anthony Wambua, who is a blind intern in the inABLE Computer-labs-for-the-Blind program, had a chance to demonstrate his coding skills and that is what really impressed our MasterCard Foundation visitors. They could not believe how a blind individual could clearly explain how coding is done and how he teaches coding to blind students at the school.

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World Bank Visit_Computer Lab
World Bank Visit_Computer Lab

We were privileged to welcome World Bank Senior Social Development Specialist Kimberly Vilar and Social Development Specialist Annette Omolo to our program in Thika Primary School for the Blind. They came to see how the students with visual impairment are able to access technology.

Our guests interacted with students who were using a variety of computer devices, including desktop, laptop and iPads. Additionally, several primary school pupils were able to demonstrate:

  1. Research skills using google.com/youtube.com on desktop computer. It helps them learn different subject topics for in classes such as science.
  2. Typing skills using MsWord application software.
  3. Using a math game called mathflash they displayed their keyboard skills.
  4. Reading school textbooks using Kindle on iPad, and doing research using iPad too.
  5. Creation of simple websites by use of HTML coding.
  6. Searching for and reading online news online resources i.e. nation.co.ke, standardmedia.co.ke

Our students’ did an outstanding job presenting their computer-skills capabilities using assistive computer technology. They exhibited the value of computer literacy for the blind, inclusion and accessibility with confidence. We are so very proud of all of these students and their instructors and are even more energized to fulfill our mission “to empower the blind and visually impaired students in Africa through assistive computer technology”.

Thank you World Bank for your interest, support and enthusiasm for the inABLE computer labs for the blind. We appreciate the recognition and accolades for the impact and many benefits our programs give to blind and visually impaired youths in Kenya.

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Organization Information

INABLE, CORP

Location: Washington, DC - USA
Website:
Project Leader:
Irene Mbari-Kirika
Founder & Executive Director
Atlanta, GA United States
$9,361 raised of $30,000 goal
 
131 donations
$20,639 to go
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