End animal suffering in KCMO urban core

by Chain of Hope KC
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End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
End animal suffering in KCMO urban core
Apollo on the way to the vet when he was rescued.
Apollo on the way to the vet when he was rescued.

Chain of Hope operates and serves in the lower income areas of Kansas City, Missouri, assisting pet owners with their animals. We have had some extremely cold weather here, so we would head out on outreach, looking for dogs living outside. We would talk to the owners or drop off a bag of straw for their dog house if no one answered. On Super Bowl Sunday we were out. It was a brutally cold day. We spotted a dog whose chain led into his dog house. We stopped and went to the door. No one answered. We left our information, a bag of straw and some treats. We were really hustling, trying to get to as many outside dogs as we could. The next day, I drove by this house to make sure the owner had put the straw in the dog house and he had. On to the next house-the wind chill that night was going to be below zero and we had many dogs to get straw to. 

Two days later, we received a message from someone who said that he thought his dog was sick. I called him back and he told me that he had found his dog with his head hanging out of the dog house the next morning and he was “asleep”. He had brought the dog in the house and said that he was starting to come around. I knew immediately what had happened, but the man didn’t seem to realize it. I told him that his dog had almost frozen to death last night. He seemed very surprised that this had happened. I told him to put a hot water bottle up next to him and/or a heat pad wrapped in a towel, cover him with blankets and I would be right there. This was the house that we had left straw at and I had driven by the next day to make sure the straw was in there. Thank God we had stopped and left our information on his door.

When I walked in his house, I saw a pit bull with a large heating pad across his back and a space heater going. He kept trying to stand up, but kept falling over. It was difficult to watch him struggle. I was talking to the owner and trying to access the situation. As the dog fell down again and was turned away from me, I could see hip bones sticking out underneath the heating pad. I lifted up the heat pad and it was then that I saw that this poor boy was completely emaciated! He was skin and bones and he had almost frozen to death. The owner was mentally challenged and did not seem to understand the severity of this situation. I told the owner that the dog needed to come with me and I needed to get emergency veterinary care for him. He signed him over to Chain of Hope and I headed to the vet.

This poor dog’s temperature didn’t even register on the thermometer. The vet said that thermometers start registering at 92 degrees and even at that, a dog would be close to death if not dead. He was in terrible shape. I left him at the hospital for the day so they could get him warmed up and get him going on fluids and medications. They had him on a heat pad and warm IV fluids. He had deep sores on his legs. He only weighed 38 lbs. He had barely made it and he might not have had we not given this owner straw a couple of days before and he had put it in the dog house. That straw might have been the only thing that kept poor Apollo from truly freezing to death. The low temperature of the night he barely made it through was 11 degrees.

Apollo is now doing amazing! In two weeks, he put on 19 lbs!! The sores on his legs are healing up and he is a very happy boy. He did test positive for heart worms, so he will have to undergo that expensive treatment in the near future. We are so happy that Apollo made it! We know some of them don’t and that is why it’s so important that Chain of Hope is operating in the urban core, finding these animals that are neglected and abused. Thank you for keeping us out there for the animals. We couldn’t do it without you!

Apollo was totally emaciated. So sad.
Apollo was totally emaciated. So sad.
Skin and bones and terrible sores on his legs.
Skin and bones and terrible sores on his legs.
Apollo getting a refreshing, warm bath!
Apollo getting a refreshing, warm bath!
Apollo is doing great! Handsome boy!
Apollo is doing great! Handsome boy!
Apollo, 2 weeks after rescue! Thank you donors!!
Apollo, 2 weeks after rescue! Thank you donors!!
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We trapped Charlie in the woods.
We trapped Charlie in the woods.

Chain of Hope was called several months ago about a stray dog that was hanging out in the woods. He appeared to have an injured neck. The caller told us that there appeared to be dried blood around his neck and that even though no one could get very close to this dog, they could smell a horrible smell coming off of him from a distance away. She had been putting food and water out for him, but no one could get close to him. I told her that I would head over with a trap.

I saw this dog when I first got over there, but then he ran back into the woods. He was a large, black and white male and I could see a lot of dark-colored fur all around his neck. I showed the woman how to set the trap, and left a pack of hot dogs and some canned food. When we still didn’t have this boy the next day, I took the trap and dragged it far back in the woods and set it. I got a call later that day that the dog was in the trap! Success! Now we could help him.

When we got this boy back to our facility and got him out of the trap, he was very sweet and happy to be rescued. He did stink very badly from his wound. There was a lot of pus coming out of his neck from an obvious infection.

We named this boy Charlie and this began a long journey of trying to get Charlie’s neck to heal. He was sedated more than once and the wound flushed and cleaned with a drain put in it. His neck still didn’t heal. The veterinarian finally x-rayed Charlie’s neck and discovered that there was a broken needle in his neck! Charlie had somehow swallowed a needle, it had broken and it was lodged in his neck! That was what was causing this infection. Charlie went back into surgery to retrieve the broken needle, which was not an easy task.

Even after this, Charlie’s neck did not heal. It got a little better, but something was still very wrong! Charlie went back to the vet. We remembered what the vet had told us when he had found the needle. He told us that the only thing that he was worried about was that he hadn’t found a thread or string. Well, Charlie ended up going back into surgery. It was a difficult surgery trying to find a thin thread in all of the tissue in the neck. It was quite a surgery, but the vet found a fairly long piece of thread! That’s why his neck would not heal completely, poor guy. He had had five surgeries, four drains and endured a lot of discomfort until we could figure it all out.

Charlie recovered in a foster home and did very well. He had also tested positive for heart worms and had to endure that treatment next. Heart worms are parasites that are passed to dogs from infected mosquitoes and the treatment can be hard on the dog. Poor Charlie went through that medical procedure as well.

Charlie’s wonderful foster mom who had cared for him so well through much of his ordeal, decided to adopt Charlie! Charlie lives with her forever now and will have a great life! When we first trapped this boy, we never would’ve guessed that he’d swallowed a needle and thread. We never would’ve guessed that his care was going to cost us about $5,000, but we think Charlie is worth every penny! Thank you for your support so that we can help dogs like Charlie!

Charlie, injured, laying by the woods.
Charlie, injured, laying by the woods.
X-ray of broken needle in Charlie's neck.
X-ray of broken needle in Charlie's neck.
Charlie after his final surgery.
Charlie after his final surgery.
The thread gotten out of Charlie's neck.
The thread gotten out of Charlie's neck.
Charlie with his new mom!
Charlie with his new mom!
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Cletus, eye infections, living under a camper.
Cletus, eye infections, living under a camper.

This is quite the story of just one rescued dog. What we want you to know is that we do this all year long, over and over again for so many animals. It is only possible because of your support. Here is the story of Cletus’s transformation.

 

Chain of Hope was asked for help at a house where a man had four pit bulls. Three of them seemed to be favored, but the 4th one was not well cared for at all. While the other three dogs were inside/outside dogs, poor Cletus was always on a chain in the back yard. He was 10 yrs. old and he was the sweetest dog in the world!

When we first went over there, it was winter time. Cletus’s “shelter” was a camper shell on the ground that he could get under. He was pretty thin, had an eye infection and just didn’t appear healthy at all. He sure needed a lot of help. Our hearts broke for him. We began a relationship with the owner and he finally let us take Cletus into the vet. Cletus tested positive for heart worms and received eye medication for his eyes.

This owner did not step up and Cletus continued to deteriorate. We had been asking the owner if we could take Cletus for good and he always said no. However, we were very persistent. We knew Cletus had to be treated for his heart worms of he would die from them. Eventually, the owner signed Cletus over to us. It took multiple visits to the home and constantly talking to the owner to get him to see that Cletus would really be better off with us. It was a very happy day when he signed our relinquishment form and we left with Cletus for good-never to return.

We were able to get Cletus’s eye infection cleared up. He does have “dry eye” and has daily eye drops for the rest of his life. We got him through his difficult heart worm treatment. Cletus was eventually adopted by a young couple that love him so incredibly much. They recently were married and they included Cletus in their engagement photographs. Don’t they look great? Cletus is the picture of health now! He is much loved and shows his new parents just as much love right back to them!

Thank you for your support so that we can continue to turn these animals’ lives around and save them-just like Cletus! 

Cletus's home when we first met him. Horrible.
Cletus's home when we first met him. Horrible.
Cletus, looking good at one of his doctor visits!
Cletus, looking good at one of his doctor visits!
Ten years old, visiting Santa for the first time!
Ten years old, visiting Santa for the first time!
Cletus with his wonderful new parents! Happy boy!!
Cletus with his wonderful new parents! Happy boy!!
Cletus's entire life changed! He is loved!
Cletus's entire life changed! He is loved!
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Montana was a skeleton. On to better things!
Montana was a skeleton. On to better things!

Chain of Hope works in the urban core of Kansas City, MO every day of the week helping animals and their owners. We receive numerous requests for help every day. Sometimes, the situation is literally life or death for an animal. Our response is critical in saving a life. Montana is one of those dogs. Read on.

Chain of Hope received a call from a maintenance man who had seen a dog in the inner city that was in horrific shape. When I called him back, he told me that it was emaciated and that it looked like it would not make it until morning. He said that he had gone to the door of a house where the dog was laying, kind of off to the side. Someone answered the door, they were impaired and mumbled something about “that dog sure needs some food”. The man who was trying to help didn’t know if it was the home owner’s dog or not. He left and called Chain of Hope. I told him that I would head over to look for this poor dog.

When I got over there, I drove back and forth looking and around the neighborhood. I could not find this dog and it was going to be getting dark and much colder soon. After looking for quite a while, I decided that I was going to go to the door of that particular house again and try and talk to them. As I was getting out of my car, I looked over and I saw the dog! It was almost camouflaged in the tree line, just laying there curled up in a ball in the leaves, trying to get warm.

I grabbed some canned dog food and started lobbing some chunks close to the dog as I walked towards it. I didn’t want it to try and get away. It had no interest in the food at all. I crept closer to her, still tossing food and coaxing her to come to me. She finally stood up and tried to take a step towards me and collapsed. She was totally emaciated and very weak. There is no way she would have made it through the night. I picked her up and put her in my car and drove her to the emergency clinic that we use.

When I got to the emergency clinic, they brought a stretcher out. Her head was hanging over the side of the gurney as they whisked her to the back. I was so worried about her making it. I hoped and prayed we’d gotten her in time.

The nurses at the clinic started calling her Montana. They all took excellent care of her! Montana stayed at the emergency clinic the entire weekend, receiving life-saving IVs and expert care. Her bill was almost $2500, but we know she’s worth every penny! Montana is doing great now! We got rid of her parasites and she is gaining weight. She is gaining confidence and now wags her tail almost constantly! Her entire life has changed.

Chain of Hope is called to emergencies all the time. Montana is just one example. We appreciate you donating to us so that we can continue to help the neediest of the needy in the inner city. We could not do this difficult work with you!

Montana, day 3 at the emergency clinic.
Montana, day 3 at the emergency clinic.
When I first saw Montana and she couldn't get up.
When I first saw Montana and she couldn't get up.
Montana was starved and full of parasites.
Montana was starved and full of parasites.
Montana is beautiful inside and out!
Montana is beautiful inside and out!
Montana is putting on weight and feeling good!
Montana is putting on weight and feeling good!
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This homeless woman had 2 dogs, well cared for.
This homeless woman had 2 dogs, well cared for.

Chain of Hope helps thousands of people and animals every year in the inner city of Kansas City, MO. A large group of people that we help with their animals is the homeless population. Many of the homeless in our community have animals. These animals are often their only true companion and friend that they have in this world. Being homeless, it’s hard to provide for yourself, let alone an animal. The truth is that homeless people often hook up with homeless animals and take them under their wing. But due to their circumstances, they need help. Chain of Hope is there, offering help with no judgement.

We have spayed and neutered many animals for homeless people. It can be hard to connect, but we usually can come up with a meeting spot to pick up and drop off their pet. Communication can be difficult because often the homeless have no phone or they are only able to keep their phone on sporadically. We are patient and figure it all out for the sake of the animal that needs help.

Most homeless people love their animals dearly. These companions help them emotionally and mentally to connect to the world. Most of their pets are well cared for with a little assistance from Chain of Hope. If they are not well cared for, we work to get them relinquished and into a better situation. Drugs and alcohol can play a part in the owner’s attitude toward their pet. If things turn ugly for the animal when the owner is compromised, we get it out of there. These cases are in the minority, though. For the most part, they dearly love their animals and just need a little help with food, shelter and veterinary care.

We’ve encountered people that will sleep on the streets with their animals if they can’t find housing where they can take their pet. They would rather do that than get into a facility where they cannot keep their beloved animals. We understand this and help them all we can. It is because of your support that we can step in and help the homeless retain their pets. We appreciate all of you!

Putting an ID tag on a homeless man's dog.
Putting an ID tag on a homeless man's dog.
Giving cat supplies to this homeless young man.
Giving cat supplies to this homeless young man.
People and 3 dogs living in their truck.
People and 3 dogs living in their truck.
Needed help with hair loss on dog. Living in tent.
Needed help with hair loss on dog. Living in tent.
We fixed 3 dogs for these homeless people.
We fixed 3 dogs for these homeless people.
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Organization Information

Chain of Hope KC

Location: Raytown, MO - USA
Website:
Project Leader:
Kate Quigley
raytown, mo United States
$40,575 raised of $40,000 goal
 
1,254 donations
$0 to go
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