Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities

by International Disaster Volunteers (IDV)
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
Build Rescue Boats in Flood Prone Communities
A crew wearing life-vests
A crew wearing life-vests

With summer now upon us our thoughts are with our friends in the Philippines. While typhoons can strike the country at any time, August is traditionally the most active month. So, since our last report we’ve been working with our amazing local partner Buklod Tao to help the community of Banaba prepare for disaster.

Thanks to your incredible generosity we’ve helped provide 12 flood rescue boats to this community on the outskirts of Manila. We’ve now almost raised enough to provide another boat, but when we asked Buklod Tao about their priorities they reminded us not to forget the amazing volunteer crews who use these life-saving vessels to rescue their neighbours when the worst happens. Other volunteers help respond in other ways and Ka Noli had to this to say about the selfless teams of individuals who put themselves in harms way:

“Our consensus is to provide ponchos to four boat crews, thus 20 ponchos in total. The same thing is also true for the life vests, i.e. 20 pcs for 4 crews. But we also want to provide 75 team members (inclusive of community kitchen volunteers) with accident insurance valid for 1 year.”

These volunteers are essential to keeping the community safe, so we were keen to support this work and recently provided around $500 or £400 to cover the costs.

Yet, these crews need a base of operations and this base is the Banaba Livelihood and Evacuation Centre which is also used as shelter during typhoons and accompanying floods.

So, with your fantastic support we’ve also helped Buklod Tao to undertake some important maintenance and improvements to the building.

Buklod Tao’s President Ka Noli, described the work that needed doing:

“The Center maintenance is an important item on our agenda. In our latest meetings we have been discussing that the roof or downspouts have not been repaired or repainted since installation in October 2013.

At present, the room for sewing tetra bags/pots/coco feet [for income generation], the storage room adjacent to it and the lighting fixture at the 2nd floor stairways have no electric power. We would therefore like to use funds from IDV donors to undertake this work”

Ensuring the Centre is watertight and usable for both evacuations and as a base for coordinating the rescue boats is vital. So, we were happy to support these initiatives.

All these vital preparations are only possible thanks to your continued generosity.

We’ll keep you posted as our work in Banaba continues, and if you have any questions please don’t hesitate to email Andy@IDVolunteers.org. I’d be delighted to hear from you as always.

A newly purchased poncho
A newly purchased poncho
A newly purchased life-vest
A newly purchased life-vest
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
73 year old Yolanda says thank you!
73 year old Yolanda says thank you!

Thank you so much for helping to build rescue boats in flood prone communities. We’ve said again and again that these boats are proven life-savers, and we’ve recently been able to gather photos and stories to help show you how.

The first (above) is of 73 year old Yolanda. Yolanda’s husband sadly died eight years ago and she lives with her two grandchildren in the Baybay Ilog 2 area of Banaba. Life has been tough for Yolanda since her husband’s death and she lives in a poorly constructed house just 10m (30ft) from the banks of the Nangka river. Her home is often flooded during heavy rains and typhoons.

Yolanda’s age means she can’t move quickly, and she was in real danger of being trapped by the floods caused by typhoon Ulysses in late 2020. Thankfully, one of our flood rescue boats was nearby and able to save Yolanda’s family and their neighbours.

Ka Noli, President of our local partner - Buklod Tao, recently interviewed Yolanda and here’s what she had to say:

“The IDV-funded boats are a big help to us and to my neighbors. Many of us would have drowned if there were not boats. Thank you to the donors for protecting us”.

The second face (below) is of 48 year old Erna. Erna lives with her husband and six children in a poorly constructed house. Their family suffers from intergenerational unemployment and poverty and, like many of their neighbours, they’re incredibly vulnerable to disasters.

So, they were also badly affected by typhoon Ulysses. Erna’s husband and son both lost what little work they had, and the family became completely reliant on relief distribution.

Thankfully their lives were protected by the Helen Thompson rescue boat. So, while things have been tough, they all lived to fight another day.

Erna had this to day: “I sincerely thank IDV and its donors for the assistance!”.

We echo Yolanda’s and Erna’s thanks. We’re currently fundraising here on GlobalGiving to provide our next flood rescue boat. If you’d be interested in sponsoring a boat and choosing its colour and logo, please don’t hesitate to email Andy@IDVolunteers.org. I’d be delighted to hear from you as always.

Yolanda's grandson Antonio
Yolanda's grandson Antonio
48 year old Erna
48 year old Erna
The Helen Thompson boat
The Helen Thompson boat
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Banaba residents with Ka Noli pictured far right
Banaba residents with Ka Noli pictured far right

It’s hard to believe 2021 is almost at an end, and as the holiday season approaches we want to take a moment to thank you for your amazing support this year.

As we described in our last project report, the threat brought by typhoons in the Philippines is constantly evolving, and it’s only because of your generosity that we’re able to adjust and respond accordingly.

While typhoons themselves are rooted in nature, their frequency and severity is often driven by man-made activities. Climate change and carbon emissions are good examples but sometimes the activities are more mundane, like construction.

Ka Noli, President of our local partner, Buklod Tao, described some emerging concerns.

“There are two rivers in our community of Banaba; the Marikina River and Nangka River, the latter being a tributary to the former. In times of continuous downpour, these two rivers steadily rise. 

It appears that the Marikina River is sprucing up. There is a river dike being constructed along the Banaba side and construction is going full speed. In summary, the flow of the waters of Marikina River is diverted towards the center and many metal planks are being hammered down by heavy equipment. The perception of many is that the flood danger would be minimal due to the dike.

Yet, the Nangka River drains to the Marikina River, and if Marikina River is already full with flood waters and the current is very swift, the Nangka River is suffocated and can no longer drain onwards to the Marikina. Thus, the Nangka River flood waters overflow to nearby peripheral communities that lie along the embankments. Worse still, the wall infrastructure erected by the government's Department of Public Works and Highways along the embankment of Nangka River on the Banaba side suffered the brunt of strong currents during last November’s typhoons.

This resulted in the collapse of a 100-meter length of the wall and another stretch of wall further along the river. Now just a half meter of space remains between the eroded portion and the houses of poor informal settlers. The area has been declared by local authorities as no longer safe for habitation, therefore residents at the peripheries of this river are advised to move out, but they are not moving out due to non provision of government support. 

They are, as I see it, imminent "internally displaced families". Thus the focus of Buklod Tao DRR might need to shift to the embankments of Nangka River and the safety of families and individuals living therein. In case there would be a sudden flood, rescue boats would become indispensable in this area.”

Ka Noli’s updates show the ongoing but ever changing need for assistance. So, if you’re able to donate this holiday season then your generosity will help us respond, whatever dangers 2022 brings to Banaba

Once again, thank you so much for your ongoing support, and if you ever have any questions please don’t hesitate to email Andy@IDVolunteers.org. I’d be delighted to hear from you.

The collapsed Nangka River wall
The collapsed Nangka River wall
A resident surveys the damage
A resident surveys the damage
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
The Grahame Maher in action during Ulysses
The Grahame Maher in action during Ulysses

Thanks so much for helping provide rescue boats for flood prone communities.

These boats have proven to be lifesavers time and time again, including during typhoon Ulysses which struck the Philippines at the end of last year. Ulysses also brought some important lessons for the boat crews and our local partner Buklod Tao that we’ve been responding to over the last few months.

During the typhoon many boats had to navigate narrow alleys and fight heavy currents. Ka Noli, Buklod Tao’s President explained what they realised in the process:

“It was observed that the paddles were used to push forward the boat by pressing the paddles against the walls of houses alongside the flooded street. Also, when the floodwaters were swift the paddles were sometimes no match to the current. There must be one more tool for the boat crews. We would like to provide "Tikin" poles to make the mobility of the boat more efficient by pushing.”

Because of your brilliant donations we’ve been able to provide fourteen of these Tikin (or quant) poles - one for each of the volunteer boat crews that protect their local communities. Thank you for making this vital adaptation possible.

In our last report we also highlighted how typhoon Ulysses had revealed gaps in the fleet’s geographical coverage, and that Buklod Tao were considering moving the Grahame Maher boat to protect 150-200 families living in the Baybay Ilog 2 area of Banaba. Plans have since moved forward, and Ka Noli again explained:

“After earlier discussions with the prospective team leader, Jhun Sarte, we have organized one new Buklod Tao DRR Team at Baybay Ilog 2, very close to Dama De Noche street, Dona Pepeng Subdivision, Banaba. We have handed over to the team one Tikin pole, two paddles and four life vests. We could not identify a secure place to dry dock the boat so the game plan is for the IDV-donated multicab truck to haul the Grahame Maher boat to the new Team at Baybay Ilog 2 during inclement weather”.

This isn’t the only redeployment of existing boats being considered after Ulysses. Major development projects spreading out from metro Manila are also diverting waterways and changing flood patterns. Ka Noli continued his report:

“I would add here the prospect of recent non-flooding in the previously heavily flooded area of Armpac.Testimonies have it that during last year's typhoon Ulysses Armapac was no longer flooded due to the almost completed huge drainage system that accompanies the construction of C-6 Highway. We are going to actively observe Armpac this coming flooding season, and if Armpac is truly spared from flood(s), we would  opt for the retrieval of the Nova Mills Boat for hand-over to one other flood prone area.”

The nature of the threat brought by typhoons in the Philippines is constantly evolving, and so too is how we work to protect against it. And while some areas are now less exposed than before, many more are increasingly vulnerable. So, we're continuing to raise funds for more rescue boats right here on GlobalGiving.

Once again, thank you so much for your ongoing support, and if you ever have any questions please don’t hesitate to email Andy@IDVolunteers.org. I’d be delighted to hear from you.

The boat crews have a new tool thanks to you
The boat crews have a new tool thanks to you
The Grahame Maher will now protect Baybay Ilog 2
The Grahame Maher will now protect Baybay Ilog 2
The Nova Mills stationed in Armpac may be moved
The Nova Mills stationed in Armpac may be moved
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
The Brgy. IVC boats leaving the boat shop
The Brgy. IVC boats leaving the boat shop

It’s hard to believe that the 2021 Pacific typhoon season is now less than a month away. 

Typhoon Vamco, known locally as Ulysses, only struck just before Christmas, bringing widespread devastation to Luzon, the island on which the capital Manila sits. However, Ulysses hit right at the end of the previous season, meaning that affected communities have had little time to recover and catch their breaths before getting ready to brace for impact once again.

Our amazing local partners Buklod Tao have used this precious time to do everything they can to prepare for the next round of storms though, including helping to provide new flood rescue boats and making sure the existing fleet is being utilised as effectively as possible.

Buklod Tao’s founder and President, the indomitable Ka Noli, explained about the new boats:

“We are once again in a lockdown mode similar to last March/April last year due to the increase in the number COVID-19 cases all over the country. Thus, non-essential volunteers do not report to Buklod Tao Center due to safety protocols. 

But amidst the pandemic we still are organizing essential work and managed to fabricate two units of the small design fiberglass rescue boats. These boats were commissioned by the St Vincent Foundation for use in Sition Olandes, Brgy. IVC (Industrial Valley Complex) in Marikina City. This area lies next to the mighty Marikina river and is ever more frequently affected by the rising waters now.

The boats were proposed, approved and constructed very quickly, all this was completed between the later part of February and the last week of March 2021. Hauling to Sition Olandes (named after Holland) was undertaken after the Holy Week, 7th April.”

Ka Noli went on to explain about the planned changes to the deployment of the existing fleet:

I have started talking to a prospective leader of a new Disaster Risk Reduction (DDR) team here in the Baybay Ilog 2 area of Banaba. This area was really engulfed by the flood waters of nearby Nangka River last November 2020 during typhoon Ulysses. 

We estimate there are 150-200 families residing here, very near the Nangka River, and this particular area has no rescue boat coverage at all. So, we would like to earmark the Graheme Maher boat, provided by IDV, to this community. This boat was used before in North and South Libis, but there are several small rescue boats also in this area that can help. So, please do not worry about these areas being endangered.

We have asked the prospective DRR team leader, Jhun Sarte, if there is a sufficient space where The Graheme Maher boat could be dry-docked, and stay free from damage. The Graheme Maher could stay put here at Buklod Tao Center grounds if not and we could simply haul it when typhoon warnings are raised”.

We’re pleased that yet more vulnerable communities are benefitting from the protection of flood rescue boats and we’re currently using some of your donations to this project to undertake some repairs to the Grahame Maher before its redeployment. We’re also continuing to raise funds for more rescue boats so that even more communities can benefit in future.

Once again, thank you so much for your ongoing support, and if you ever have any questions please don’t hesitate to email Andy@IDVolunteers.org. I’d be delighted to hear from you.

The two Brgy. IVC boats ready for delivery
The two Brgy. IVC boats ready for delivery
The transport arrives
The transport arrives
The boats being loaded
The boats being loaded
Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
 

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating.

Get Reports via Email

We'll only email you new reports and updates about this project.

Organization Information

International Disaster Volunteers (IDV)

Location: Bristol, Somerset - United Kingdom
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @IDVMedia
Project Leader:
Andy Chaggar
Bristol, Somerset United Kingdom
$20,015 raised of $22,000 goal
 
331 donations
$1,985 to go
Donate Now
lock
Donating through GlobalGiving is safe, secure, and easy with many payment options to choose from. View other ways to donate

International Disaster Volunteers (IDV) has earned this recognition on GlobalGiving:

Help raise money!

Support this important cause by creating a personalized fundraising page.

Start a Fundraiser

Learn more about GlobalGiving

Teenage Science Students
Vetting +
Due Diligence

Snorkeler
Our
Impact

Woman Holding a Gift Card
Give
Gift Cards

Young Girl with a Bicycle
GlobalGiving
Guarantee

Sign up for the GlobalGiving Newsletter

WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.