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Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance

by Worldwide Indigenous Science Network
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Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance

Dear Donor,

 

As always, we are immensely grateful for your support during these challenging times. Especially in these times, we know there are so many ways you can choose to share and that you’ve chosen to share with us means a lot. As in the previous months, much of the work of our partners has either ceased or has slowed due to the pandemic. However, one partner in Kyrgyzstan has been able to move forward with his plans to implement a program to teach school – age children about the Snow Leopard and its importance in not only their ecosystem, but also in their cosmology.  

 

This Elder and traditional cultural practitioner has developed a program through which he will travel to schools to educate children in fun and innovative ways about the Snow Leopard. Understanding that much of the cultural significance of the Snow Leopard to his people has disappeared, his motive is to bring the Snow Leopard and Snow Leopard consciousness back into the minds and hearts of children. As children learn and grow their understanding of the importance of this sacred species, the hope and desire is they will carry this knowledge and wisdom with them and will help in the conservation efforts of these sacred beings. Also, it gives them a firmer grounding in who they are and the importance of their cultural traditions. 

 

Though unable to travel to as many schools as he might like, he is modifying plans as he goes and as Covid-19 plans continue to evolve and be implemented in Kyrgyzstan and in his community. Some of this may move to an online forum, and where possible, he intends to travel to the communities to meet with the children and share his wisdom.


We thank you for your ongoing support of this work and other work in our alliance. And as always, we appreciate you sharing our work with others.

 

We hope that you and your loved ones and communities continue to be safe and well, and that balance be restored to the earth. 

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Jaguar
Jaguar

 Dear Donor, 

 

Thank you for your ongoing support of the Global Big Cat Alliance. Given the times we are facing, since much of our work involves direct contact with our partners and community outreach and since essentially the whole globe has been on some form of lock down, some of our work and the work of our partners has been halted or slowed due to the pandemic. And unfortunately, the impact of this virus is reaching more than just humans.
 

A few weeks ago, we received word from one of our Jaguar partners that a conservation facility in Mexico –  an organization devoted to rehabbing and releasing Jaguars back into their natural habitat – was suffering to the point where they were unable to feed or provide medical care for the jaguars in their care. Their primary source of revenue is through income generated from visits to the organization. With the shut down and shelter in place orders across the globe, this conservation facility in Oaxaca had to do the same, meaning no income was being generated throughout the past six or more weeks. 


We were able through your support to provide emergency support to the organization to provide much needed food and medical support for the next month. Their hope is that they can reopen their doors soon and generate income to feed and keep these beautiful animals safe. 


We share with you some videos of them providing medical support to the jaguars in their care as well as two of the jaguars being reunited. 

Thank you for your ongoing support of this work. We hope that you and your loved ones are safe and well, and that balance be restored to the earth.  

Facility referenced in the report
Facility referenced in the report

Links:

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Past tiger festivals
Past tiger festivals

Dear Donor,

 

Thank you for your continued support which enables us to bring Western and Indigenous knowledge systems together for big cat conservation. We know there are many ways you can choose to spend your money and we appreciate that you chose to support us.

 

This quarter, we weren’t focused on one particular big cat, but were actively connecting with a number of our partners.

 

Jaguars: We were able to bring two Jaguar Indigenous Cultural Practitioners together during a meeting of our organization—one a Mixteca from Mexico and the other a Yawanawa from Brazil. From previous reports, you might recall that the vision of our partners is to create a corridor of protection that extends from Brazil through Central and South America into North America. Because of poaching activities, this continues to remain a challenge, so meetings like these to exchange ideas and resources are critical. Both have returned to their homelands with new ideas and inspiration for new projects to continue with these efforts.

 

Tigers: We are also working on plans to bring a small delegation to China in early 2020 to attend a tiger dance festival in the southern region. We will bring Snow Leopard cultural practitioners with us from Central Asia, and our hope is that they can connect with the Tiger cultural practitioners. The struggles they face are similar—less territory for these sacred animals means they hunt in areas close to humans. Humans, through fear, greed and other reasons, kill or poach the animals to either protect their own livestock or for a price (for bones, pelts, etc.) It’s a struggle around the world and it’s why we are doing what we are doing—trying to find new ways of supporting life.

 

We will send more updates on the progress of these various projects soon and we thank you again for your kind and generous support.

Past tiger festivals
Past tiger festivals
Tiger practitioner from previous tiger festival
Tiger practitioner from previous tiger festival
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Yawanawa Elder praying
Yawanawa Elder praying

Dear Donor,

 

Thank you for all that you do to help us bring Western and Indigenous knowledge systems together for the conservation of these beloved big cats. These cats, as we’ve indicated in previous communications, are important not only in their own right, but because our very survival depends on theirs! We are immensely grateful to you, to the ancestors, and to the spirit of the big cats.

 

As you are aware, the Amazon is burning. Our focus this month, therefore, was on support of our Jaguar partners in the Amazon, the Yawanawa. This culturally intact tribe has been living in the Amazon for thousands of years and the culture is intrinsically connected to the Jaguar. There are more jaguars found in this region per capita than elsewhere in South America. Not only are the trees burning, but all of life is burning, including unfortunately, our beloved Jaguars. 

Last month after being in ceremony and away from any sources of news, they came out from ceremony to look towards the moon. To their surprise, they could not see the moon because of the thick haze from the smoke from the fires. They shared with us that while there have been fires in the past, this was the worst they had ever experienced. The fires are burning closer to their communities and to the rivers and in wider swaths than ever before. And unfortunately, not much is being done to stop the fires. Tribal members have been putting fires out as much as they can using their own hands. We were contacted by our partners for emergency support for additional boats to patrol the waterfront, which we were able to do in part because of the support provided by you, dear donors, will go a long way in supporting our partners and ultimately the big cats in the region. One of our partners was also invited to the United Nations to speak about the situation in the Amazon, and they have been conducting meetings with international conservationists in Brazil. Hopefully, raising awareness will increase support to put out these fires and to restore balance and life.

 

Please continue to help us to help Indigenous Cultural Practitioners who understand the importance of preservation of sacred cultures and connections to share the cosmovision that inspire humanity to return to balance. Thank you!

International presentations regarding the Amazon
International presentations regarding the Amazon
International conservationists meet in Brazil
International conservationists meet in Brazil
Yawanawa member presenting at the United Nations
Yawanawa member presenting at the United Nations
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WISN team with Alexander
WISN team with Alexander


This quarter, with support from donors like you, we were able to invite Mixteca Indigneous Cultural Practitioner, artist and partner Ernesto to our big cat project development team gathering in Southern France.There we connected him with Paleolithic cave expert, Pascal. This cross cultural exchange focused on the historic spiritual significance of big cats in cultures throughout the world evidenced by newly discovered ancient snow leopard bones and cave painting depictions in the ancient cave sites of Southern France. Ernesto shared ancient knowledge about jaguars as a central sacred species to his people and the current threats jaguars face in Mexico. Pascal explained the history and theories surrounding big cat depictions in Paleolithic caves and their range and presence in ancient Europe. Ernesto plans on sharing details of this exchange and networking with his jaguar conservation partners in Oaxaca, Mexico as they continue to explore and implement cultural methodology in their jaguar conservation programs including educational outreach and jaguar tracking.

Additionally, we met with Alexander, a Krygyz conservationist based in Kyrgyzstan. This conservationist has been working in a region where Snow Leopards were technically extinct. He has been erecting Mazars (places of worship) in the region and has been working with community members to understand the spiritual and ecological significance of Snow Leopards. After 10 years of developing these strategies, miraculously, there are now 23 Snow Leopards reported to be living in the region. Any number more than 14 Snow Leopards is considered a viable population.

These types of meetings and gatherings are vital in order to share knowledge, find how we connect, create support systems and generate new ideas. In this way innovative big cat conservation methods using both cultural and scientific techniques can be created and implemented.

We are grateful for the support in our shared work and we hope to bring Ernesto and Alexander together via Skype or in person to share ideas for conservation of Jaguars and Snow Leopards.

Pascal describing big cat depiction in cave
Pascal describing big cat depiction in cave
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Organization Information

Worldwide Indigenous Science Network

Location: Lahaina, Hawaii - USA
Website:
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Project Leader:
Beth Duncan
Lahaina, Hawaii United States
$9,220 raised of $10,000 goal
 
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