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Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance

by Worldwide Indigenous Science Network
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Big Cat Conservation: A Global Alliance
Yawanawa Elder praying
Yawanawa Elder praying

Dear Donor,

 

Thank you for all that you do to help us bring Western and Indigenous knowledge systems together for the conservation of these beloved big cats. These cats, as we’ve indicated in previous communications, are important not only in their own right, but because our very survival depends on theirs! We are immensely grateful to you, to the ancestors, and to the spirit of the big cats.

 

As you are aware, the Amazon is burning. Our focus this month, therefore, was on support of our Jaguar partners in the Amazon, the Yawanawa. This culturally intact tribe has been living in the Amazon for thousands of years and the culture is intrinsically connected to the Jaguar. There are more jaguars found in this region per capita than elsewhere in South America. Not only are the trees burning, but all of life is burning, including unfortunately, our beloved Jaguars. 

Last month after being in ceremony and away from any sources of news, they came out from ceremony to look towards the moon. To their surprise, they could not see the moon because of the thick haze from the smoke from the fires. They shared with us that while there have been fires in the past, this was the worst they had ever experienced. The fires are burning closer to their communities and to the rivers and in wider swaths than ever before. And unfortunately, not much is being done to stop the fires. Tribal members have been putting fires out as much as they can using their own hands. We were contacted by our partners for emergency support for additional boats to patrol the waterfront, which we were able to do in part because of the support provided by you, dear donors, will go a long way in supporting our partners and ultimately the big cats in the region. One of our partners was also invited to the United Nations to speak about the situation in the Amazon, and they have been conducting meetings with international conservationists in Brazil. Hopefully, raising awareness will increase support to put out these fires and to restore balance and life.

 

Please continue to help us to help Indigenous Cultural Practitioners who understand the importance of preservation of sacred cultures and connections to share the cosmovision that inspire humanity to return to balance. Thank you!

International presentations regarding the Amazon
International presentations regarding the Amazon
International conservationists meet in Brazil
International conservationists meet in Brazil
Yawanawa member presenting at the United Nations
Yawanawa member presenting at the United Nations
WISN team with Alexander
WISN team with Alexander


This quarter, with support from donors like you, we were able to invite Mixteca Indigneous Cultural Practitioner, artist and partner Ernesto to our big cat project development team gathering in Southern France.There we connected him with Paleolithic cave expert, Pascal. This cross cultural exchange focused on the historic spiritual significance of big cats in cultures throughout the world evidenced by newly discovered ancient snow leopard bones and cave painting depictions in the ancient cave sites of Southern France. Ernesto shared ancient knowledge about jaguars as a central sacred species to his people and the current threats jaguars face in Mexico. Pascal explained the history and theories surrounding big cat depictions in Paleolithic caves and their range and presence in ancient Europe. Ernesto plans on sharing details of this exchange and networking with his jaguar conservation partners in Oaxaca, Mexico as they continue to explore and implement cultural methodology in their jaguar conservation programs including educational outreach and jaguar tracking.

Additionally, we met with Alexander, a Krygyz conservationist based in Kyrgyzstan. This conservationist has been working in a region where Snow Leopards were technically extinct. He has been erecting Mazars (places of worship) in the region and has been working with community members to understand the spiritual and ecological significance of Snow Leopards. After 10 years of developing these strategies, miraculously, there are now 23 Snow Leopards reported to be living in the region. Any number more than 14 Snow Leopards is considered a viable population.

These types of meetings and gatherings are vital in order to share knowledge, find how we connect, create support systems and generate new ideas. In this way innovative big cat conservation methods using both cultural and scientific techniques can be created and implemented.

We are grateful for the support in our shared work and we hope to bring Ernesto and Alexander together via Skype or in person to share ideas for conservation of Jaguars and Snow Leopards.

Pascal describing big cat depiction in cave
Pascal describing big cat depiction in cave
Tashka Yawanawa gives an interview on Maui
Tashka Yawanawa gives an interview on Maui

Dear Donor,

 

Your support continues to enable us to bring Western and Indigenous knowledge systems together for big cat conservation and for this we are extremely grateful.

 

Last year, we sent a security expert to meet with the Yawanawan tribes as Phase I of the Yawanawan vision to create a corridor of protection from deep in the Amazon to North America. We reported on that meeting in a previous report.

 

This past month, WISN met with the Yawanawa Chief at WISN headquarters to discuss and plan Phase II of security training, which will include bringing the same security expert back to the Amazon for further training and discussions about methods for working with local government.

 

Recently our Yawanawan partners made an award-winning film about the spirit of the jaguar and plant medicine: http://www.awavenavr.com/assets/downloads/AWAVENA%20PRESS%20KIT%20Web%20Version.pdf

WISN is supporting our partners to attend a premier of the event, which will elevate awareness of the jaguar and of our partners in the Amazon.

WISN, with your support, is also providing supporting to the Chief’s daughter to further their education so that she may follow in her father’s footsteps, assuming more of a leadership role in the community so that she can go out into the world to talk about the importance of jaguar protection and conservation

Finally, we are in discussion to send a world-renowned Hawaiian carver and canoe maker to the rainforest to share canoe-building techniques with the community. While it is not directly related to jaguar conservation, the renewal of ancient technologies and connection to these ways helps empower the people. It strengthens the community knowledge, their independence, self-determination and their connection with the land. When people are connected to the land and nature, they are more likely to be more invested in it. If this doesn’t happen, this way will be lost forever lost.

We are immensely grateful to you, donors, and to the ancestors for your support.

Chief Yawanawa sharing info with WISN partners
Chief Yawanawa sharing info with WISN partners
One of the newest cubs
One of the newest cubs

Dear Donor,

 

Your support continues to enable us to bring Western and Indigenous knowledge systems together for big cat conservation and for this we are extremely grateful.

 

Currently, there are only 13 White Lions in the wild and approximately 300-500 in captivity. First seen in the wild in the 1970s, they were extracted from their ancestral lands as humans believed these big cats were albinos that would never survive in the wild. Nothing is further than the truth.

 

Most White Lions at that time were sent to zoos and circuses or worse, to trophy hunting facilities where cubs are routinely removed from their mothers, and then handled and bottle fed by humans only to be used as breeder lions or for trophy hunters who wish to pay large sums of money to “hunt” and bring a trophy home. However, in 2004, four White Lions were rescued from a trophy hunting facility by one of our Big Cat Alliance Partners, the Global White Lion Protection Trust. These lions not only proved they were able to hunt on their own, they also provided the genetic information which determined definitively to scientists that the white lions are in fact a genetic subspecies of their tawny relatives. Within a few years, three new White Lion cubs were born. However, it has been ten years since any other White Lion cubs were born. Until two months ago. We wanted to report to you donors that four White Lion cubs were just born to two of the White Lions two months ago. WISN supports the White Lions in a number of ways, including bringing groups to the site which raises awareness and funds for the project. We also support community projects in the area.

 

WISN continues to support our Big Cat partners, including the Global White Lion Protection Trust through your support, which is critical right now. These cats, like all apex predators, are important not only in their own right, but because our very survival depends on theirs!

 

We are immensely grateful to you, to the ancestors, and to the spirit of the big cats.

 

Thank you!

New life
New life

Dear Donor,

 

Thank you for all that you do to help us bring Western and Indigenous knowledge systems together for the conservation of these beloved big cats. These cats, as we’ve indicated in previous communications, are important not only in their own right, but because our very survival depends on theirs! We are immensely grateful to you, to the ancestors, and to the spirit of the big cats.

 

WISN has worked closely with Jaguar Artist, Musician, and Indigenous Cultural Practioner (ICP) Ernesto Hernandez Olmos for many years. He conceived of and has begun plans for a jaguar sanctuary, within which the Ceremonial Center of Spirituality, Art, and Culture of Oaxaca will be housed. ICP Olmos will direct the center.

 

The center was created with the objective of preserving the ancestral traditions and practices of the Elders by focusing on the culture and spirituality of the Jaguar. The teachings and practices of spiritual ceremonies and rituals of healing, such as the Temazcal, plant medicine ceremonies and sound therapy (healing via the sound of ancestral instruments), will all be a part of the center which is currently under construction.

 

The aim is to promote education and awareness to the next generations and to bring awareness to the importance of protecting the jaguar and its habitat, which represents our mother earth. ICP Olmos, international spiritual healing arts practitioner and member of the WISN network, has worked for several years to build community and institutional connections to support the Jaguar of Light in Oaxaca, Mexico. He has been working with wisdom keepers, scientists and historians from three different continents with the goal of preserving the ancient historic connections of the sacred cats such as white lions of Timvabati, white leopards of Asia, white tigers of Russia and China, and Jaguars of the Americas. 


In 2015, he started developing the Central American Network of the union of scientists and shamans working together for the preservation the of spirituality of the jaguar and the conservation of its habitat and well being. WISN is supporting him in his efforts.

 

Please help us to help Indigenous Cultural Practitioners like Olmos who understand the importance of preservation of sacred cultures and connections to share the cosmovision that inspire humanity to return to balance. 

An example of ICP Olmos
An example of ICP Olmos' artwork
More examples of ICP Olmos
More examples of ICP Olmos' artwork
Jaguar of Light from Oaxaca
Jaguar of Light from Oaxaca
 

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Organization Information

Worldwide Indigenous Science Network

Location: Lahaina, Hawaii - USA
Website:
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Project Leader:
Beth Duncan
Lahaina, Hawaii United States
$8,925 raised of $10,000 goal
 
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