Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India

by NTFP-EP Asia
Play Video
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India
Signboards bearing names of important food plants
Signboards bearing names of important food plants

Project updates and progress

Work in the nursery for wild food plants are on-going. Wild food plants have been raised or cultivated in the nursery from seed and are housed at the Adukkam Resource Centre. These include the very little known plants Olax scandens and Cansjhera rheedii, as well as some bamboo (Dendrocalamus strictus). Some of these food plants are ready to be planted in other forest sites with the help of indigenous communities. 

These months the effort has been to introduce lesser known plants that can be harvested from the wild. These include: Caralluma (stems), Costus (rhizomes), Eryngium/ Celastrus/ Bauhinia/ Solanum/ Amaranthus (leaves), as well as bulbils of Dioscorea. Some of these photos are available and attached in this report. 

Some effort was also made to leave behind some food sources for birds, especially the vulnerable Common Grey Hornbill, and the Hill Myna (Gracula religiosa). These foods sources are essentially species of Ficus, Syzigium and Grewia. 

Due to the Covid-19 situation the students were limited. The Covid-19 situation along with incessant rains in the areas have prevented further workshops with the adivasi people. The team plans to conduct workshops within the next months. 

We invite you to watch this video about the Adukkam Resource Centre and the impact of the wild food gardens, nursery work and training that have been conducted thus far. Such exchanges among women, youth and adivasi people on lesser-known food plants strengthen knowledge, systems, and practices and have rejuvenated forest food traditions among adivasi communities. 

Support our work with adivasi women

We continue to solicit support to further our work on nurseries and support adivasi women's activities on inter-generational learning. To date, we have raised $2,020 for the project. Donations are most welcome to help in our work with adivasi women training youth on forest foods. Your contribution will help us cover training materials and costs for work in the nursery and the planned workshops.

Please visit our page to learn more and to find out how you can be part of this on-going initiative on forest foods in India.

Costus spp.
Costus spp.
The forest as learning space for food sources
The forest as learning space for food sources

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
Adivasi women - masters of wild forest foods!
Adivasi women - masters of wild forest foods!

Project updates and progress (as of 12 May 2021)

In our latest report, we share about a workshop on inter-generational knowledge transfer on wild foods that happened from March 21-22, 2021 at the Palliyar settlement at Kudhraiyar, Tamil Nadu, India. There were about 35 participants in the workshop, ranging from about 2-75 years in age, with a predominance of women - the true masters of wild forest foods!

Discussions were facilitated and a field visit to the forest was initiated, with older people leading the youth and children during the latter part of the workshop.

It became quite clear that there was a gap in knowledge between generations within the Palliyar community but also that both generations were eager to learn from each other and work towards bridging the gap.

The wild food workshop held also opened graver issues that need to be addressed alongside the transfer of indigenous knowledge (in this case about wild foods). This will require more discussions with the people and mediating or facilitating between these communities and the local authorities. Another workshop is planned in the coming months to take into account the present outcomes. We plan to hold smaller discussions in the short-term to consolidate inputs and ideas towards the further development of the forest food field school program.

Read more about the report in the attached document.

Your donations are most welcome!

To date, we have raised $1,833 of our $10,000 goal for the project “Adivasi Women Train Youth on Forest Foods in India”. Although we have not yet reached our fundraising goal, we are pleased to report progress so far in terms of social preparatory activities and learning exchanges, including the initial workshops that have been started

Our vision is to facilitate inter-generational knowledge transfer and conversations on the subject of wild foods and forest foods in India. We are aiming to establish a Forest Food Field School program to address the knowledge gap of youth and locals on important food sources from the forest.

We continue to seek your support to help Adivasi women train youth on identifying, documenting and harvesting nutritious food from the forest and grow their own food gardens for food resilience. You may visit our page to find out how you can contribute to the establishment of the Forest Food Field School in Addukam, India.

Inter-generational knowledge transfer
Inter-generational knowledge transfer
You don't return empty-handed from the forest
You don't return empty-handed from the forest
A meal fresh from the forest harvest
A meal fresh from the forest harvest

Attachments: Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

The identification and consumption of wild foods has declined vastly among most populations, including the Adivasi populations that have knowledge about these foods, Their dependence on the market for most food stuff, including the foods supplied by the Public Distribution System, has left them vulnerable as well as unhealthy as most of these food are processed and/or refined, and with very narrow choices. This training intended to revive the knowledge still latent among the people - women and men in communities, increase the range of foods that are recognized as edible, discuss the reasons in their communities that lead to the decline in the consumption of such foods, and find ways to revive such traditions.

The essential purpose of the initial training was that of improving the basic and general understanding about wild foods and nursery techniques particularly among Adivasis and community resource people nearby the Adukkam Resource Centre - to initiate the forest foods field school project. The participants discussed seed collection and planting techniques, observation and identification of food plants through a forest walk, food gathering techniques and even some preparation and cooking techniques. 

The participants in the training were adivasi and rural people in the region belonging to Adukkam, Tamaraikulam, Panjamthangi odai, Genguvarpatti; some student-researchers were from Kanyakumari district; the resource people were from Kudhraiyar as well as from Genguvarpatti.  

A  feedback was that the tribals and school students can be given awareness on forest foods and its uses in order to make them into healthy citizens in future.  More field trainings on wild foods are expected in the future. 

We are pleased to share more about the initial training activity in our attached full report with photos. 


Attachments: Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
 

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating.

Get Reports via Email

We'll only email you new reports and updates about this project.

Organization Information

NTFP-EP Asia

Location: Quezon City, Metro Manila - Philippines
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @ntfp_ep
Project Leader:
Madhu Ramnath
Kodaikanal, Tamil Nadu India
$2,020 raised of $10,000 goal
 
35 donations
$7,980 to go
Donate Now
lock
Donating through GlobalGiving is safe, secure, and easy with many payment options to choose from. View other ways to donate

NTFP-EP Asia has earned this recognition on GlobalGiving:

Help raise money!

Support this important cause by creating a personalized fundraising page.

Start a Fundraiser

Learn more about GlobalGiving

Teenage Science Students
Vetting +
Due Diligence

Snorkeler
Our
Impact

Woman Holding a Gift Card
Give
Gift Cards

Young Girl with a Bicycle
GlobalGiving
Guarantee

Sign up for the GlobalGiving Newsletter

WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.